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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling!!!
This season of Star Trek sets it's standards high. Some of the episodes have your teeth clenched with fear and how can everything turn out right. Somehow, the Enterprise survives and lives on.

There are some appearences from Tasha Yarr which is a twist to the tale because she died in series one. Q makes an appearence when he's lost all of his powers and the...
Published on 26 Nov 2006 by Alex Harrison

versus
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Star Trek The next Generatin season 3
I was wondering if any body else who has Star trek The Next Generation Season 3 onwards.
If anyone is having the same problem I have had. After you have played the first episode,it does not stay in English and you have to go into communications on the menu
to change it each time to English. As the first two seasons, one and two are not doing this.Thanks.About...
Published on 19 Mar 2008 by Potter


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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling!!!, 26 Nov 2006
By 
Alex Harrison - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
This season of Star Trek sets it's standards high. Some of the episodes have your teeth clenched with fear and how can everything turn out right. Somehow, the Enterprise survives and lives on.

There are some appearences from Tasha Yarr which is a twist to the tale because she died in series one. Q makes an appearence when he's lost all of his powers and the war with the Romulans starts to get tense.

My favourite episodes are Yesterdays Enterprise, Evolution, The survivors, Booby trap, Deja Q, Captains holiday, Menage a troi, Transfigurations and Best of both Worlds. Even though these are my favourites, there are none which I don't like.

Sometimes the picture quality isn't quite up to scratch. I feel as though if you had a big screen, it would look blurred at times. Also, the first part of best of both worlds is good, but you have to buy series 4 to descover the outcome. Apart from that, it's fantastic.

Just think, you're getting 25 episodes of Star Trek!. And you won't regret it if you buy one. Highly recommended and loads of fun.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TNG hits its stride, 5 Sep 2011
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
With Season Three I'm in agreement with those reviewers who see this as the point where The Next Generation started to impress its audience. The quality of the writing, the cast performances and the look of the show all improved greatly. Whilst it still has some flaws, depending on what your favourite characters and episodes are, it has a consistency that was lacking for the previous two years. This season started out with strong ideas; from Wesley Crusher accidentally creating intelligent nanobots that threaten the ship and a scientist's life work (Evolution), Data's dilemma of how to convince a colony that they leave their homes where they are under threat of massacre (Ensigns of Command) to an unusual drama of two humans living unharmed on a world otherwise destroyed by an alien invasion, which leads to a devastating conclusion (The Survivors).

With episodes like "Who Watches the Watchers", "The Defector", "Deja-Q" (a personal favourite for some great lines and Guinan's behaviour to Q), "A Matter of Perspective", "Yesterday's Enterprise", "Hollow Pursuits" and the two-part cliffhanger "The Best of Both Worlds" it puts the show in a much better position. Although there are some misfires and less than dazzling episodes it does highlight that the proportion of good episodes increased and provided entertaining stories that went from Cold War-esque scenes with the Romulans to dealing with emotional subjects such as the effect of death on Enterprise families (The Bonding), mental health issues (Sarek) and the first in-depth look at the Klingon home world (Sins of the Father).

Definitely worth viewing to see how much this season improved the show's overall direction.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Getting Better all the time!, 23 Aug 2012
By 
Brawny Withed (Leeds, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
Season 3 of Star Trek TNG builds upon the success of the first two seasons with improved storylines and a strong cast.

At this point in the series we're finally able to enjoy episodes featuring not just missions involving the whole crew but stories that centre around a central character such Data (The Offspring), Worf (Sins of the Father) and Captain Picard (Captains Holiday).

My favourite episodes in Season 3 is 'Yesterday's Enterprise' with an alternate present and the welcome albeit brief return of Tasha Yar (Denise Crosby). My second is 'Déjà Q' where the crew encounter Q once again with hilarious consequences, especially making Data experience laughter (Priceless!).

Episode List:

1.Evolution
2.The Ensigns of Command
3.The Survivors
4.Who Watches the Watchers
5.The Bonding
6.Booby Trap
7.The Enemy
8.The Price
9.The Vengeance Fatcor
10.The Defector
11.The Hunted
12.The High Ground
13.Déjà Q
14.A Matter of Perspective
15.Yesterdays Enterprise
16.The Offspring
17.Sins of the Father
18.Allegiance
19.Captains Holiday
20.Tin Man
21.Hollow Pursuits
22.The Most Toys
23.Sarek
24.Ménage à Troi
25.Transfigurations
26.The Best of Both Worlds Part 1

Star Trek TNG is in general one of the best Television Series ever and Season 3 doesn't disappoint, I highly recommend this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More galactic adventures, 10 Mar 2010
By 
LXIX (scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
1989/1990's double Emmy award winning 3rd series of Star Trek: The Next Generation contains 26 episodes, each of approximately 42/43 minutes in length. In terms of casting, the familiar faces are all here - with the notable change that Dr. Crusher returned to replace Dr. Pulaski. Other, more subtle, changes appear to include darker (more serious) lighting and slight uniform changes (to the crew's collars).

With 1129 minutes of run time, this pack of 7 DVDs is now very keenly priced.

Extras on disk 7 are "Mission Overview" (17 mins), "Selected Crew Analysis" (13 mins), "Production" (20 mins) and "Memorable Missions" (13 mins).

Here's my personal take on the individual episodes (from best to worse):

*Episode 26: The Best of Both Worlds Part 1 (The Borg infiltrate federation space for the first time by destroying a remote colony on Jouret IV and the Enterprise is sent to investigate. In a game of cat and mouse, it is clear that Borg technology is far ahead and that `resistance is futile'. Members of the Borg cube abduct Captain Picard from the bridge and assimilate him as `Locutus of Borg'. They then set course for an attack on sector 001 i.e. Planet Earth)

*Episode 10: The Defector (After a chase across the neutral zone, a high-ranking Romulan officer defects and brings news of a military build up and covert plan for war between the Romulan Empire and the Federation. The Enterprise crew remain unconvinced and think he could be a spy. The results of a sensory probe suggest some foul play may be at work. In order to fully establish the facts they finally enter the neutral zone and come head-to-head with two uncloaked Romulan warbirds)

*Episode 7: The Enemy (A vintage Federation - versus - Romulan cold war tale of high brinkmanship, subterfuge and unlikely cooperation. An away team responds to a distress signal from a barren Federation planet half a light year inside their own territory - however, bizarrely, they encounter Romulans there on a covert mission. Up on the Enterprise, one wounded Romulan captive requires Klingon genetic material to survive, while the other remains stranded on the storm-ravaged planet with Geordi La Forge. The high stakes incident forces both empires to the brink of renewed hostilities)

*Episode 17: Sins of the Father (A Klingon commander beams aboard the Enterprise to replace Riker as Number One as part of an exchange. This alone would make a good plot, however it emerges that he is actually Worf's unknown younger brother. He informs Worf that their father has been denounced as a traitor to the Klingon Empire as he allegedly passed on security details to the Romulans - resulting in the infamous attack at the Khitomer Outpost, which lead to 4,000 Klingon deaths. Worf decides to risk his life by raising a case against this in the Klingon capital city, Qo'noS. Picard beams down with him and acts as his defence. The episode provides a first ever look at the Klingon planet and its architecture and weather. At one point, Picard goes dangerously undercover through the old town of the main city. This episode won an Emmy award for best art direction)

*Episode 15: Yesterday's Enterprise (The Enterprise encounters an unusual space/time phenomenon and a `what if?' scenario plays out - the Federation is still engaged in a ferocious war with the Klingons as the predecessor Enterprise ship arrives 22 years in the future. Only Guinan seems to be aware that everyone is living in a warped timeline. An interesting episode, not only for its plot, but also for a glimpse into how things could have been. Tasha Yar makes a return here and personifies the distorted reality in which everyone is living)

*Episode 13: Déjà Q (While attempting to correct the dangerously unstable orbit of a moon around a populated planet, the super-entity, Q, suddenly appears on the deck of the Enterprise. Stripped of his powers by his own continuum, Q tries to get used to being human and attempts to assimilate with the crew. As well as his uncouth manners and natural belligerence, a life form called the Calamarians attack the Enterprise to get even with the newly enfeebled being. An entertaining episode with a few comedic moments near the end)

*Episode 23: Sarek (The 202 year old Federation Ambassador, Sarek, from Vulcan is beamed aboard the Enterprise in order to travel to important treaty negotiations with the Legarans (whom we never actually see). Acts of violence break out among the crew, including a full scale barroom brawl in Ten Forward, and these are linked to Sarek's arrival and his unsettled mind. It is deduced that the ambassador has a Vulcan old age ailment called Bendii syndrome, and only a Vulcan mind-meld with Picard may save the day and allow the treaty negotiations to take place)

*Episode 21: Hollow Pursuits (A human interest story that works well. Lieutenant Barclay from Engineering has social interaction problems and prefers to spend as much time as possible in the fantasy world of the holodeck. Indeed even the word `holodiction' is mentioned. I think this would be a real life problem if such a device existed, so this episode has a ring of credibility to it. As well as dealing with Barclay's incompetence and erratic behaviour, a series of engineering malfunctions are added to the plot mix - leading to a dangerously accelerating warp speed that can't be resolved)

*Episode 8: The Price (The Enterprise plays host to bidding talks for the rights to control a wormhole that connects to the Gamma quadrant of the galaxy. There's skulduggery from the Ferengi delegation and a part empathic negotiator who also gets involved with fellow empathy, Troi. Meanwhile, during the talks, Data and La Forge journey through the wormhole in a shuttle pod and establish that all is not quite what it seems)

*Episode 25: Transfigurations (While charting a star system, the Enterprise locates a crashed pod on a rocky planet. One seriously injured survivor is beamed aboard and appears to have miraculous powers of recovery. The amnesiac sickbay visitor, nicknamed, John Doe, turns out to be much more than he appears. Even Geordi La Forge has a huge zip in confidence just by being momentarily connected to him. However, a powerful species called the Zalkonians come after him and claim that he is, in fact, their escaped prisoner)

*Episode 18: Allegiance (Picard falls victim to alien abduction and finds himself in a holding cell with 3 diverse aliens. Meanwhile, a doppelganger takes his place on the Enterprise and his unusual behaviour first of all raises eyebrows, then eventually drives the crew to breaking point. This is actually a rather funny episode in places)

*Episode 11: The Hunted (While on a visit to Angosia to assess their Federation membership application, an exceptionally resourceful prisoner escapes from a high security penal colony. The Enterprise helps to recapture him, only to lose him again while attempting to transport him back. His back story is a dark tale of being forcibly programmed as a killing machine and then being unable to reassimiliate back into mainstream Angosian society when their Tarsian Wars ended. This episode features a great cat-and-mouse chase sequence through the Enterprise)

*Episode 3: The Survivors (A distant Federation planet has been destroyed by an unknown species. Inexplicably, 2 elderly humans and their house survive. More strange events unfold as Troi is haunted by constant music in her head and the Enterprise is chased out of orbit by a powerful alien warship. Eventually, Picard demonstrates his uniquely deductive mind and is in a league of his own as he connects and unravels the events)

*Episode 22: The Most Toys (An obnoxious and egotistical collector of rare items in the galaxy captures Data by means of a deceptive ruse involving a shuttlecraft explosion. The rogue plans to keep Data as a display item and to show him off to other traders.)

*Episode 20: Tin Man (The Enterprise is instructed to make contact with a vessel which is actually a life form (and ironically resembles a croissant). A starfleet betazoid expert in first contact, Tam Elbrun, is beamed aboard to facilitate this. The problem is, though, that Elbrun has developed an affinity with the new life form and has a different agenda. All this is set against the backdrop of a star on the point of going supernova and two hostile Romulan warbirds who are intent on reaching the vessel first)

*Episode 6: Booby Trap (The Enterprise becomes snared in an asteroid belt that is emitting radiation. This episode belongs to La Forge and follows his attempts to break them free with the help of a long-dead Federation engineering expert, Leah Brahms, who is regenerated by the holodeck. Picard also displays his masterful mind here and at one point even pilots the vessel)

*Episode 24: Ménage à Troi (Troi's mother Lwaxana is subject to the amorous attentions of the unscrupulous Ferengi commander, DaiMon Tog, during trade negotiations. His feelings are unrequited, so he kidnaps her along with Troi and Riker who are on shore leave on Betazed. All 3 are held captive aboard a Ferengi vessel. Wesley Crusher once again saves the day and is rewarded for doing so)

*Episode 12: The High Ground (While delivering medical supplies to a non-aligned planet, Dr. Crusher is kidnapped by a band of rebels fighting a bitter civil war. The rebels then use their advanced technology to mount a daring raid on the Enterprise and almost succeed in blowing apart the warp chamber. Picard is also kidnapped and, with the help of Wesley Crusher's tracking skills, Riker and Worf seek to liberate their colleagues on the planet below)

*Episode 14: A Matter of Perspective (Riker is accused of murdering an eminent scientist on a space station and Picard is under pressure to extradite his Number One into custody on the local planet. Instead of doing so, he orders a full scale reproduction of events on the holodeck. Several versions are recreated in order to get to the bottom of what actually happened. A courtroom type of episode and one in which Riker's womanising habits are brought to the fore)

*Episode 4: Who Watches the Watchers? (A slow burn episode with thought-provoking philosophical undertones. An Enterprise away team are sent to rescue a few observation scientists on a planet also populated by a primitive Vulcan-like civilisation. They inadvertently reveal their presence, making the locals deduce that Picard is an all-powerful god. This episode raises issues about the thin line between what is magic, science or irrational religious beliefs)

*Episode 5: The Bonding (The Enterprise's archaeologist is killed by an explosion during an away team mission, leaving her 12 year old son orphaned. As the crew try to console him, his `mother' reappears in alien form and tries to prise him down to the planet. A sinister episode that almost has a horror film or supernatural thriller feel to it at times)

*Episode 19: Captain's Holiday (An exhausted Picard is finally convinced by the crew to take a week's shore leave on the paradise planet of Risa. Trouble is never far away, though, and the captain soon becomes embroiled in the hunt for a small sought after device with magical properties. A love struck ferengi in a loud shirt, two time-travelling aliens from the 27th century and a beautiful archaeologist make up the character mix in this tepid tale of deceit)

*Episode 2: The Ensigns of Command (The belligerent Sheliak Corporate wish to evict a colony of humans from a distant planet under the terms of a century old treaty with the Federation. Due to the planet's high radiation levels, Data is despatched to negotiate with the colonists but meets great resistance to the idea of abandoning their home. Meanwhile, in space, Picard is forced to analyse the fine detail of the treaty in order to find a way to stop the imminent obliteration)

*Episode 16: The Offspring (Data creates a `daughter' with powers more developed than his own in some areas. Unfortunately, as he begins to bond with the new android life form, a Starfleet admiral has other ideas and wishes to take her away to a starbase for analysis and development. A slow burn episode. Directed by Jonathan Frakes [Riker] and written by an unknown (then) amateur writer who submitted a draft of the script on spec)

*Episode 1: Evolution (While the Enterprise is observing a neutron star, Ensign Wesley Crusher is the inadvertent villain as his personal experiments in nanotechnology go awry and some nanites break free, multiply and evolve into a new life form - in doing so they run riot throughout the Enterprise's main computer system and bring them close to disaster)

*Episode 9: The Vengeance Factor (Following a series of raids by a wayward band of spacefarers, the Enterprise becomes embroiled in trying to negotiate a peace settlement between the belligerents and the sovereign of their home planet. Someone, though, has murder in mind due to a century long vendetta between the parties and Dr. Crusher turns detective following a mysterious cardiac arrest. A notable episode for Riker killing someone and a demonstration of the destructive power of a phaser at full setting)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Picard's Enterprise: Year three, 28 May 2014
By 
Paul Tapner (poole dorset england) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
THIS REVIEW IS OF THE 2006 SLIMLINE DVD EDITION OF THIS PRODUCT. NOT OF THE BLU RAY OR ANY OF THE OTHER ONES. IT HAS TO BE MENTIONED BECAUSE THE AMAZON SYSTEM WILL DOUBTLESS LUMP THEM ALL TOGETHER.

A seven disc box set. In four plastic containers and one larger carboard box. Containing all twenty six forty two minute long [approx.] episodes of the third season of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Sometimes, a tv show gets to the point when it's at the top of it's game. When everyone involved knows exactly what they're doing. When they know exactly what needs to be done to make quality tv. Thus even the not quite so stellar episodes are still generally still quite good viewing and time well spent.

Helped also by the arrival of new executive producer Michael Piller, and the return of Doctor Crusher, this is the season of Star Trek: The Next Generation when it all clicked. And it became quality tv. With pacy, memorable episodes that haven't really dated all that much.

They are as follows:

Evolution. Beverly's back. Wesley's experiment goes out of control. The ship is in danger. A solid season opener.
The ensigns of command. A data showcase as he has to save a human colony that doesn't seem to want his help. A good character piece for him.
The survivors. An elderly couple somehow can withstand devastating attack. There are plot holes in this one, but ultimately it's pretty moving.
Who watches the watchers? What happens when primitive aliens discover Starfleet and their technology? With moralising toned down on the first two seasons it's a solid episode with a good central dilemma.
The bonding. A few crew members have a lot to come to terms with when an archaeologist dies on a mission, not least her son. And Worf. A not unmoving character piece with some more not over the top moralising.
Booby trap. A Geordi showcase as he turns to the holodeck for help with two problems. A quite watchable character piece for him.
The enemy. Another geordi showcase as he does hell in the pacific/enemy mine with a romulan on a dangerous planet. Good drama and a great worf subplot that doesn't go for easy answers.
The price. A troi showcase as she falls for a negotiator as various parties seek to control a wormhole. The Troi moments are somewhat embarrassing but the main plot has it's good moments.
The vengeance factor. A dispute resolution is threatened by an assassin and Riker's attempts to charm the ladies. Reasonable moralising but not the most memorable tale.
The defector. Romulans again as a defection leads to secrets and standoffs. A good drama with strong characters and some surprises.
The hunted. An alien criminal shows there are two sides to every story. In a capably done but not desperately memorable morality play.
The high ground. Dr. Crusher is kidnapped by terrorists. In an episode banned by the bbc for years because of a reference to Irish unification. What could be a good drama about terrorism is far too heavy handed to work and has a cop out ending.
Deja Q. Q has to learn what it's like to be human when he loses his power. In a really fun watch.
A matter of perspective. Riker's in trouble as a result of his would be charms again in a star trek version of Rashomon. Which works well enough.
Yesterday's Enterprise. Faces from the past appear when time goes wrong. And only Guinan knows it. A classic episode with some unforgettable moments.
The offspring. Data builds an android. Good solid science fiction and star trek. One you won't forget in a hurry.
Sins of the father. Worf showcase as we learn a lot more about the Klingon homeworld. Another solid character piece.
Allegiance. Picard is kidnapped and held with other captives as a replica replaces him. Two good storylines merge for one strong episode.
Captain's holiday. Picard's holiday is interrupted when he's caught up in a treasure quest. An episode that tries to be fun. And more than succeeds.
Tin Man. Romulans and the Enterprise race to make first contact with a special ship. Good solid science fiction.
Hollow pursuits. The first appearance of neurotic engineer Reg Barclay, played by Dwight Schultz from the A team. It's fun having a character who's not entirely perfect. And the episode has many great moments.
The most toys. Another data showcase as he's kidnapped by a collector. Another good character piece for him.
Sarek. Spock's father is on board. And behaving oddly. A great look at getting old, with moving moments and stunning acting from Patrick Stewart.
Menage A Troi. Troi's mother returns again when she and her daughter are kidnapped by the Ferengi and Picard has to embarrass himself to get them back. Comedy that's not so bad for once.
Transfigurations. Beverley falls for an alien with no memory and a great destiny in a reasonable story.
The best of both worlds. The season finale brings back the Borg. Ends on an incredible cliffhanger and grips from the off. A brilliant episode.

The dvds have the following language and subtitle options:

Languages: English, French, German, Italian, Spanish.
Subtitles: English, Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish.

Disc seven has four featurettes, running from thirteen to seventeen minutes in length:

Mission overview year two. A look at the season.
Selected crew analysis. Cast and crew on the characters and what this season brought them.
Production. Stories from the production of various episodes.
Memorable missions. More stories about various episodes.

All are pretty good retrospectives with some interesting anecdotes.

This season, like all the others, belongs in your dvd collection. And you will find yourself coming back to it far more than the first two.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb box set, 25 Nov 2011
By 
Mole "Mole" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
This box set is the third season of Star Trek: the Next Generation (TNG). After a slightly slow start with the first two seasons, the writing really began to improve and the episode plots had some really strong storylines. Among these, "High Ground" addressed the concept of terrorism, "Yesterdays Enterprise" allowed the temporary return of Tasha Yar, "The offspring" re-opened discussions on the concept of Human rights for Artifical beings; and the last episode "Best of Both Worlds part 1" brought back the Borg for a chilling season climax.

The various characters really began to be fleshed out nicely by this stage and this allowed for some very strong acting from the regular cast as well as a number of the guest actors. The special effects also started to look better, and a bit better than some of the previous episodes.

The box set also has a number of extra items that I enjoyed; it's really good to see some of the background stuff that goes into the production of the programmes.

This is a great addition to any collection, and complememts the other sets really nicely.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best season to this point, 15 Mar 2010
This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
TNG was a part of my youth (as far as I remember) and a few month ago I had no other chance but recalling this. Well, I didn't remember the clumsy parts of the early seasons (nevertheless they are still great, of course) and I really feel this is the best season to this point (I acctually haven't reached the fourth by now).

The quality of the discs is similar to that of the preceding ones - and I assume, everyone reading this already owns them.

For German's information: This edition is completely equal to the German Slim Case Edition (except the charge, obviously), even though it does not become clear in the product details of Amazon. So, if you don't want to spend 50PLUS, go for it.

All in all: You want to revisit the old, pre-J.J. Abrams Star Trek universe - this edition is a good point getting into it (but you should start with season 1, really) - space-saving, cheap, good quality.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just getting better and better, 29 Mar 2009
By 
This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
I was 7 when ST:TNG started, and having recently reaquainted myself in the world of phasers, klingons and some of the best space battles you will see on TV without all that Babylon 5 CGI mess. I went online and bought all the movies then I felt my collection was incomplete now I am hunting down the series. TNG is in my opinion the best of the spinoff series, with a powerful cast of characters and of course Patrick Stewart as Captain Picard! In Season 3 the writing and quality of the episodes, FX and such are much improving. Tasha Yar who we last saw in Season 1 when she had a pointless death, here in Season 3 she returns in one episode, a welcome return both bitter sweet but mostly sweet. And of course the season finale introducing The Borg to the Star Trek mythos. This season has lower aspects not worth mentioning. Why cant TV these days be as consistent and quality as these cult TV series that ended nearly 20 years ago?
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4.0 out of 5 stars It's Difficult to be Part of the Team When You're Omnipotent, 30 Aug 2013
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
This is a review of the Season Three box set of 2006.

The first opening shot of season three shows Wesley with spots. He's growing up. Unfortunately, his insufferable mother is back on board for the season, replacing the more respectable Diana Muldaur. What else do we learn about the crew in the third season? Well, O'Brien plays the cello (I don't think so!), Picard fancies himself as a painter, and Troy loves chocolate.

Subjects that feature in this third season include nano technology, terrorism, and Picard as God. The Ferengi make more of an appearance in this season. They appear in three or four episodes, including one where Troi's mother (Majel Barrett) indulges in foreplay, caressing a Ferengi commander's ear. (Ethan Phillips appears in the episode.)

Meanwhile, Data is kidnapped and becomes a museum piece in `The Most Toys'; Spock's father Sarek (still played by Mark Lenard) is a crotchety 202 years old; and Tasha Yar returns in an episode called `Yesterday's Enterprise'. In season two, Riker spent time on a Klingon vessel. The situation is reversed in season three with Worf's brother doing a tour of duty on the Enterprise.

The worst episode is `The Offspring' where Data has a child (sic): pure humbug, with Jonathan Frakes having his first experience as director. There are also occasions of egregious bad management on display, such as when Geordi not only bad-mouths Barclay in front of his staff, but even walks in on Barclay's private holodeck programme.

The best episode? The return of the Borg in the final episode, a two-parter that sees Picard captured? Nope! Undoubtedly the best is the return of John de Lancie in `Deja Q'. What starts as a typical mundane planetary emergency (they become fairly routine after awhile) soon gets entertaining. Q, now reduced in rank to mere human, asks Data for advice, and a kind of Laurel and Hardy situation develops. Forced to become part of the team, Q complains "It's difficult to work in a group when you're omnipotent."

Notably, the music to the series, usually composed by Dennis McCarthy and Ron Jones, changes for episode twenty where Jay Chattaway is the maestro. This is briefly covered in the hour-long extras. These include the usual mission logs, produced in 2002, where the likes of Peter Lauritson, Michael Piller, and Rick Berman explain where the series stood at that time and where it was going. They and other members of the crew, as well as the cast, describe the highlights of the season, and there is an overview of the writing of the scripts, production design, and effects. The only notable absence from the interviews is Michael Dorn.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 22 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 3 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
Great to watch the series in your own time and see some previously unseen episodes. Worth the money. Getting the whole series
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