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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dragon Quest: Journey of the Cursed King review (actually written by my son)
Dragon Quest:Journey of the Cursed King is a truly spectacular game. After a long wait, a new RPG that is on par with the likes of final fantasy 7.

I'm not going to reveal too much about the storyline, but certain parts will have you in stitches and you will find yourself unable to stop playing just so you can find out how the story continues.

Most...
Published on 18 April 2006 by Mr. M. Gristwood

versus
13 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but no Final Fantasy
My expectations for this game were high - it was by Square Enix for a start and had received great reviews by the magazines I had read. That's why, on the day it came out, I dragged my boyfriend to the games shop before work to buy it for me. When I got home and turned the game on, I was a little bit shocked at first. The graphics were strange, not like anything I had...
Published on 14 May 2006 by Sashe


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dragon Quest: Journey of the Cursed King review (actually written by my son), 18 April 2006
By 
Mr. M. Gristwood (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
Dragon Quest:Journey of the Cursed King is a truly spectacular game. After a long wait, a new RPG that is on par with the likes of final fantasy 7.

I'm not going to reveal too much about the storyline, but certain parts will have you in stitches and you will find yourself unable to stop playing just so you can find out how the story continues.

Most RPGs find themselves with the same problem - the sheer amount of random battles that occur out while exploring the world map. This factor is intensfied even further by the further by the size of the world map. However, with the battle system being hugely enjoyable and far from tedious, the battles are just as much fun as oggling the amazing graphics.

Along with the large main story / quest, there is a large amount of extra sidequests and activities to participate in, the game manages falls into the 80 to 100 hour category depending on how much you level up, search for treasure chests, etc.

This game has truly done justice to the RPG genre and I strongly recommend those who haven't tried this genre to dive straight into this game. Those who are familiar with this genre, why are you reading this review, buy the game now!!!

As always, there is something to complain about, but it isn't about the actual game itself, but the fact that we didn't get a final fantasy 12 demo just like the Americans.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely fantastic!, 4 May 2006
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
First of all I will state something very honest (which is obviously the point), this game ranks in my top 3 best ever games! Here are my top 3/4 best games in no particular order:

- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time

- Final Fantasy VII & IX (Joint in best)

- Dragon Quest: The Journey of The Cursed King (Here it is!)

I truly feel that this is a marvellous game and almost anyone will like it, this game will provide stimulating gameplay for lovers of RPG's and Platformers. It combines elements of the Zelda series and small parts of the Final Fantasy series which results in an exceptional game.

Graphics: The graphics are very unique, the cel shaded graphics have only recently been established with games such as Zelda: Windwaker. This is a totally fresh and new type of graphics, it provides an uplifting and charming feel to the entire game! The graphics are so good, even if this game had rubbish gameplay I'd still play it quite a bit. Overall - Exceptional and beautiful (10/10)

Gameplay - I have had the game for 2 weeks and I haven't stopped playing it hardly at all. The gameplay is very good and will keep you going for a long while with it's interesting characters, quests, storyline and it's overall charm. If you enjoy adventures/RPG's then this gameplay will sit magically, setting on long journeys to unravel mysteries and exploring the beautiful, vast world.

There are enough extra features i.e. skill & character upgrades i.e. spells, physical abilities etc, battle records and alot of additonal extras according to sources. There are hidden treasures all over the world and intriguing side quests which are interesting and that will keep you on your toes. Overall - 9/10 Also brilliant, people that do not have alot of patience may find the battle stops tedious at times, but they are not too invasive and are interesting.

Oh and there is another small bit I've recently come across, within the first 13 hours of the game you'll be able to create new weapons and items using a cool alchemy pot which the 'Cursed King' created... very cool, you can make loads of interesting things!

Overall - 10/10

The game is almost perfect, there are endless lists of secrets and extras and the characters, graphics, storyline and additionals will keep you with the game for a long time!

Buy this game, you will not be dissapointed, if you like Zelda, you'll also love this!
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65 of 67 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars American Version - FANTASTIC!!! Make sure you buy this!!!, 16 Feb 2006
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
I have been playing the American Version of Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of The Cursed King (or Dragon Quest: Journey of The Cursed King as its to be known in Europe) and I have to say its one of the best RPGs I have ever played!
It all starts off with you journeying to find the evil jester Dhoulmagus, as he has turned King Trode into a toad and the Princess Medea, into a horse. The kings castle has also been intertwined with vines aswell. Along with these two characters you start off with another character called Yangus, an ex-bandit whos duty is to serve you 'the guv'nor' and you find out why as the story progresses. Two more join later on, Jessica and Alfred, and this makes up your party of four with Yangus and yourself, an otherwise unknown character with you to put your own name to. Pretty bog standard RPG stuff.
The cel-shaded graphics are amazing, and they should be as this is developed by Level 5 who did Dark Chronicle, Dark Cloud and the soon-to-be-released (hopefully in Europe) Rogue Galaxy. I have never ever seen such a massive world in an RPG before and you get to explore every last bit of it. Towns are relatively small in size, but charming nonetheless. Akira Toriyama (Dragonball Z) has done a wonderful job on the character design, and each is voiced with a wonderful British regional accent, something I found a bit unusual in the American version as normally with RPGs they are dubbed with squeaky American ones when they come out over here! But I found this adds to the charm of the game and it suits it perfectly.
Fighting in the game is very "old-skool" in that the way its turn based and kept very simple. This makes the fighting system easily accessible but not necessarily easy. I often found myself dying even when fighting creatures on the world map! Skill points are awarded when you level up and you use these to customize certain attributes of your character, which it turn leads to new moves being learnt. Weapons, armour, accessories - all the same equipment as other RPGs. Plus you get to synthesise your own items, after finding the recipe of course, with the alchemy pot.
There is so much I could tell you about this game, but I wont, it would spoil it for you guys that have had to wait just over 2 years for this. All I will say is BUY IT when it comes out over here as it would be a shame to let such a beautiful RPG experience go to waste!! I just hope Square does a good job with the PAL conversion as this game looks amazing running at full screen 60Hz.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For those still waiting for FFXII..., 1 Aug 2006
By 
Mr. Od Smith "d2kvirus" (Coulsdon, Surrey) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
Yes, I know that's harsh, but the fact is would as many people be playing this if the latest Final Fantasy wasn't delayed? However, the delay - though annoyingly predictable - turned out to be a blessing, as it means that many looking for a RPG fix looked to this game, and found there's much to enjoy within it.

Firstly, the basic facts: this isn't a Final Fantasy game, as rather than have a huge, sweeping epic as the plot and a lot of characters changing as the events unfurl before them, this is a lot simpler than that. Your lead character doesn't have a name or a voice, so everyone reacts and interacts with him to give you the gist of the story, which in itself is straightforward. A king and princess are cursed, so go on a quest with your hero (who was the only person to survive the curse in his kingdom) and his bandit partner, looking for a way to break it and return to normal. Naturally, this involves trekking from town to town and fulfilling sidequests in each of them, meeting up with a couple of other characters to control, and preventing the end of the world courtesy of the obligatory evil warlock.

The plot, however, doesn't take the bleak/grim/depressing (delete where applicable) view of the FF games, and plays it with a lot more charm than you'd expect. A lot of the events in the game are light in tone, which also helps the darker moments in the games as it lends them a lot of pathos. The gameworld is similar, full of warm, bright shades when the game is meant to reflect this and cold, dark shades when it isn't. The game also has a realistic day-to-night setting, with the sun rising and falling all the time, and the world is very different at night, with tougher enemies coming out.

The enemies themselves are well designed, although eventually there is the usual same enemy/different colour approach. They all have memorable looks to them, and a few have interesting attack patterns, either a group forming to become one super enemy, or others calling for backup or going kamikaze on you. Battles also vary on your own tactics, as you can control your companions or let them use some pre-set tactics. You can also increase your strength in battle to unleash some major damage.

Levelling up is the usual fare - although at level ten you don't have ten times more HP, which can get annoying if you're wiped out in a boss battle - but you can also level up your weapon skill to learn new spells and techniques, which can be a major help later on in the game.

With the gameplay so well presented, it helps that the characters are all well-rounded with interesting personal tics to differentiate all of them, with all major characters voice acted, and there is some great in-game music is, at various times, on a level with Nobuo Uematsu's work. The RPG elements are also well presented with the alchemy skills to create new weapons, armour and items to help you in your quest, so the game is certainly not shallow.

So, yes, it may not be a new Final Fantasy game that you were craving, but it is a very good RPG that deserves to be discovered and enjoyed. It might surprise you.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fabulous, traditional RPG., 27 Jun 2006
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
From the creators of Final Fantasy comes this highly enjoyable, traditional Japanese RPG. Along with stunning cel-shaded visuals, a massive world to explore and a wonderful soundtrack, comes plenty of addictive traditional role playing action and plenty of side quests to keep you going long after completion. Dragon Quest VIII can take up to 100+ hours to complete including all of the side quests, making it well worth the money spent. From start to finish, this game offers a memorable cast or characters and a pretty good storyline. It's one of the best RPGs to be released during the PS2/Xbox/GC era and is definately one of the best RPGs available on the PS2.

The only major flaws about Dragon Quest VIII are:

1. It's a traditional RPG, so it doesn't break much ground in the RPG genre. The lack of originality in the genre department is a downside (although the game's quality lies in the high production values).

2. The story can drag on quite a bit and it isn't nearly as deep as the storylines in some other RPGs.

These flaws aside, Dragon Quest VIII is a brilliant game and is one of the finest games to be released this year.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dragon Quest VIII, 19 July 2006
By 
D. Martin "Dan" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
For the first time ever, we get Dragon Quest in Europe and in my opinion it couldn't arrive at a better time. There's plenty of lengthy reviews out there so I'll keep it simple, if you like Dark Cloud and Dark Chronicle you will most probably like this game too as it is developed by the same team. If you are a fan of Akira Toriyma you will enjoy the character designs in this game. Graphically it looks really nice (uses cell shaded graphics) at first I though it looked a little dissapointing but then you get used to it and you'll love it, the music is very good, gameplay wise you get to play with 4 characters only, so if you like to have dozens of characters (like in Suikoden for example) this game only has 4 (you star off with only 2) the battle system felt a little different at first but you get used to it in no time. I finished this game in just over 120 hours!!! at around level 60 (and I used the official guide!!) although I think if you don't do all the stuff there is to do you can probably finish it in around half that time. Good value for money in my opinion, and one of the better RPGs available to European gamers.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best PS2 RPG's to date, 13 Jun 2006
By 
Russtafarian (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
This is actually the first Dragon Quest game to get a full release in the UK. The series is called Dragon Quest in Japan, and Dragon Warrior in the USA. This game is actually the eighth in the series, the first on PS2. In Japan it is equally as popular as the Final Fantasy franchise.

Square Enix have brought us a masterpiece of cute, non-threatening, incredibly engrossing and addictive gameplay. You get the sense that the game doesn't take itself too seriously, unlike the Final Fantasy series, and yet there is sooo much attention to detail you can't help but notice the amount of hard work that has gone into producing this wonder of entertainment.

The story isn't particularly difficult to follow, to begin with: serach and destroy the magician who cursed your King and hometown. Woopeedoo, sounds great! But as with all great RPG's, you get side-tracked doing many other tasks, and the lot starts the thicken as you get further in the game.

The side-quests are very rewarding. The monster arena takes some time as you ave to travel the world to collect your monsters, but you do get some great features which help you in battle!

The casino's are a little annoying, I find. I don't wanto to spend hours playing bingo and fruit machines to obtain one ultimate weapon, but unfortunately you have to if you wantthat particular item!

The graphics are fantastic. There aren't any FMV cut-scenes, because the in-game graphics are the best in an RPG (so far on a PS2) that you really dont' need them.

As you will have read, character design has been created by the chap who brought us Dragonball Z. I've never really been into that series, but you can see the style has been brought over successfully. The characters (good and bad) are colourful, and some what childlike and fun/cute.

Music is fantastic. Orchestral and well produced, you'll be humming it for hours after playing it. (Or if not humming, it'll be going round your mind for ages!)

This game will keep you engrossed for hours upon hours! My advice to you would be to obtain the walkthrough as you could miss plenty of small things (and save your time when it comes to monster hunting.) Also rememeber to spend a great deal of time levelling up your characters, as once you leave the first island, it becomes much tougher one the second island!

Enjoy! Definitely up for game-of-the-year!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars amazing!!, 16 May 2006
By 
J. E. Broad - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
if you like rpg's then you'll love this. the style jumps into the cartoon/anime world that you'll easily beleave exists with interesting and involved character thoguhout the game.

after a few battles at the start you can really get underway and wow do you! WARNING this is seriously hard to put down and you may lose days of your life palying it!

with several side quests that can tie into the main game and character customisation (like a wonderfull bunny outfit) there is any things to keep you busy

the voice overs are superb (esp yangus) a worthwhile addition from the jap release few years ago and time well spent.

i cant praise this enough it is different form other RPG like ff seris with less cut scenes and a purly unique style.

well worth a look.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun, 15 Jun 2006
By 
A. Griffiths "Adrian" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
Dragon Quest is a good, solid RPG that any fans of the genre should be playing. This review is just to let potential players know what they are in for. I won't go into the story, but to help you decide, I'll just list the features that my be the make-or-break factors for your enjoyment.

Battle style: Traditional turn-based, although you enter all character commands at once and then see the results. Depending on abilities, the turns may not come out on screen in the order you enter them, and monsters will take their turns dotted between those of your team. This can be a problem if you cast a attack-building spell on your strongest character, only to see his turn come up before the person casting the spell! Also, some reviews of the game mention that there is an AI setting for your team members so that you can let them fight by themselves and only control the team leader character directly. Well, there is but it's entirely optional, and for me that is not what an RPG is about, so I never used this setting once. Total manual control all the way, thank you.

Random battles: Yes, frequent. The world is large and getting from one place to another can take a while, so expect a lot of fighting. It's also very sprawling and confusing and you don't even get a world map for the first few hours of the game (arghh!), so expect much roaming, searching and getting lost. You'll want to kiss the character who finally gives you the world map after the hours of wandering before then (don't worry it happens at a set point in the story, and can't be missed!)

Transport: Yes, after you reach a certain point you gain access to a ship to cross the seas, and later on you are even able to fly. Plus, instead of all that running, you also become able to ride sabretooth tigers, which makes land exploration far less tiresome (you still encounter monsters but can cover ground much faster if you're just searching for treasure chests).

Saving: In a word - Argghh!! Which is because you can only save (and rest) in towns. So all the dungeons ending in a boss have to be completed in one sitting, with every recovery item you need taken along with you. This sounds like a harsh feature, but in return, you are given skills that allow you to do two important thing: you can instantly warp to the dungeon entrance at any time, and when on the world map, you can instantly warp to any town. So if you play deep into a dungeon and want a rest or are too beaten-down to face the boss, you can always warp out and recover, then come back to the front door and make your way through again - hopefully more swiftly this time, as any solved puzzles or unlocked doors will stay solved if you've done them once. And you can even cast a spell to cut out random battle encounters for a few minutes at a time, which makes these repeat trips through the same dungeon less irritating. So that's not so bad, then. I wouldn't cut out random battles too often though, because the levelling up system in this game is sloo-oow. After a brisk start, the required experience to gain levels starts becoming larger and larger, and you may be forced to do many loops of monster hunting to gain points before facing the more difficult bosses.

Items: Phew! There are hundreds of weapons, shields, clothes and accessories, plus the game features an "Alchemy Pot" which will allow you to combine items and turn them into new ones. This echoes the "Inventions" scheme of Dark Chronicle, and the "Item Refining" of Star Ocean. It's deliberately vague, presumably to encourage experimentation, and can turn into a huge side-game by itself. For those that like distractions, this could be a very large one, as many of the advanced recipies for alchemy are cryptic or just plain secrets. I guess it all helps towards the sale of strategy guides...good luck!

Which leads me on to...side-quests. Yes, we have plenty of those, one of which does not appear until you have beaten the game once. My favourite is the entirely optional Monster Arena...extra-strong enemies, a bit like mini-bosses, can be seen roaming around the world, and they can be recruited once beaten in battle, to make up a "monster team" that you can enter into tournaments for big prizes. Of course if you can find the really strong ones ( along with actually defeating them) in the far-flung corners of the world, you can form a real killer team and earm some great rare items. Plus your team also become available as a "summon" in battle, and this turned out to be a life saver for me in some tough fights, as your monster team can really come to your rescue and dish out the damage - and withstand it - in some of the harder battles of the main game storyline. Plus it's very satisfying to see a monster that took so much effort to beat go out there and use those powerful offensive moves for your benefit - I almost found myself cheering when my top team won some of the arena battles! They are real characters to watch too, because they act of their own accord in battle. When you let them fight (in the Monster Arena and as your support summon), you can only start the fight and then cross your fingers as the team make their own decisions on how to proceed...hopefully they will make mincemeat out of your enemies, but some of the more dopey monsters will choose comedy actions like rolling on the ground and purring (Fat Cat) or staring into space and scratching himself (Klub Kong). This can be hysterical to watch, but it's hardly a winning battle stategy!

That aspect leads me to the sense of humour present in this game. There's a lot more fun in the random battles in this game that I expected. Whoever wrote the script for them has a great sense of the absurd. I'll give you some examples: An enemy called a Tap Devil can perform an attack called "Underpants Dance" in which he does a kind of disco shimmy, and then pokes his backside at you. The first time I saw this, my male characters were unaffected, but Jessica fell to the floor in shock...and I was laughing my head off. Other comedy came from some big fat things called Notso Machos who sometimes hurl themselves at you causing damage, but also hurt themselves in doing it. They flop onto the floor in a very comical style, and I never tired of seeing that attack. Then there are the sexy witches who do a bewitching attack called "Puff-Puff"...which is basically some fluttering of eyelashes and bust-jiggling while a cheeky parp-parp noise plays on the soundtrack...it can entrance the male characters, but if tried on Jessica it will fail, and the caption says "Jessica has won the battle of the bulges"...And in addition to all this madness, the voice acting is British! People talk in a wide range of comical accents ranging from broad cockney to the overly affected, they call each other "dearie" or "old bean", and talk about tea and say things like "posh" and "cor blimey"...it was all very accurate and authentic!

The above examples should let you know that Dragon Quest can be a very entertaining game as well as a challenging one. But don't let all this fun fool you - some parts of it can be tough and there are times when you may think the enemies being thrown at you are unfairly difficult. So be prepared for a challenge. Interestingly, the game never ends after a party defeat, you will automatically be resurrected at the last place you saved - but minus half your total money holding, which is harsh indeed if you have saved up a small fortune to spend on expensive weapons and items, only to see it completely halved by one defeat. But again, the game is not really unfair, as I already mentioned that if the going gets tough, simply take a break from your current quest (flee current battle, call Monster team, etc), by immediately warping to a town to recover and save. There's no need to risk the next random fight if you are near death with no magic or healing items! However, you may be well prepared but still fall in the face of a particularly unfair match (I've seen battles with up to TEN opponents squaring up to my team of four!!), but to ensure your finances, the game has banks in certain towns for you to deposit money in, rather than carry it around, and this is NOT lost by a party defeat. So be sure to drop off large sums regularly - its free! Plus defeat and ressurrection does not rob you of any experience gained up to that point...so put that together and I hope it all sounds like a fair trade for the harsh save system. I appreciate the thought put into these settings, as I feel they are fair enough to stop unexpected death being a total waste of 3 hours play without saving, but strict enought to make you cautious, and learn when to retire and re-group. It only took me two cash-draining downfalls to never forget it!

Take all this in, and the game becomes totally addictive. It looks good, plays smoothly, and it's a long one too. Be ready to give up a lot of your social life!
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43 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars buy it now, 11 Mar 2006
This review is from: Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King (PS2) (Video Game)
Many of the RPG's I know have suffered immensely in their transition from 2-D to 3-D (the "Suikoden" series immediately comes to mind, as well as "Breath of Fire"). The colors become washed out, the gameplay becomes much more boring, and in many ways, they just plain svck...
Enter "Dragon Quest VIII" from Enix, the 6th game of the series to be released over here. I have only played for a couple of days, but I must confess that I am quite pleased at the result of adding a new dimension to the gameplay.
For starters, the environment (including the "overworld" is now fully interactive. There are set roads the player may travel, but one may also branch off of these roads to find new caves, treasure chests and secrets galore. Hence, it trumps FFX in this regard (although the playable demo of FFXII included in the game already has me salivating!). Furthermore, some walls contain secret passages, etc., and in general the game offers full movement in the world and secrets which are only made possible in the 3-D setting.
As for the gameplay (and here may be a bit of fanboy-itis, I'll admit), the game is much more fun than its predecessor. Gone is the cumbersome class system of DWVII (which I personally liked, but many hated), and in its place is a very easy to learn skill system. Each party member has five skills which they can raise any way they like. Skill points are awarded at level ups, and as skills gain more points (and the point distribution is entirely up to the player), the party member will gain battle spells and "traits", which are essentially bonuses to attack, defense, etc. The game is quite linear at the front, but I know of a few sidequests later in the game which will give the player more freedom to choose his path.
As for the graphics, well, they don't stand up next to the might of the FFXII demo packaged alongside, but the cel-shading seems perfect to bring out the charm of Akira Toriyama's character and monster designs. However, I am surprised that the female character can manage to keep her incredibly-revealing top on!
In any case, this is a worthy addition to the "Dragon Warrior" legacy, and a fine game in its own right. And I particularly like the translators' decision to use British persons for the voices of the characters - it just comes off better, it seems to me...
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