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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic albums from 1967 and 1968
Judy Collins was trained in classical music, but became interested in folk music before beginning her recording career as a traditional folk singer in the early sixties. As the sixties progressed, she absorbed other influences.

Wildflowers, from 1967, utilized orchestral backing that replaced the simple guitar that dominated the instrumentation on her earliest...
Published on 9 Jun 2009 by Peter Durward Harris

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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic albums from 1967 and 1968, 9 Jun 2009
By 
Peter Durward Harris "Pete the music fan" (Leicester England) - See all my reviews
(No. 1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
Judy Collins was trained in classical music, but became interested in folk music before beginning her recording career as a traditional folk singer in the early sixties. As the sixties progressed, she absorbed other influences.

Wildflowers, from 1967, utilized orchestral backing that replaced the simple guitar that dominated the instrumentation on her earliest recordings. However, Judy's outstanding voice still retained its place as the primary instrument over all others. The album features three of Judy's own compositions (Since you asked, Sky fell, Albatross), three of Leonard Cohen's (Priests, Sisters of mercy, Hey that's no way to say goodbye) and two of Joni Mitchell's (Both sides now, Michael from mountains) among its ten tracks. One of the other two tracks (Song of old lovers) is a translation of a Jacques Brel song, while the other (A ballata of Francesco Landini) is a very old Italian song. Both sides now (which Joni begged Judy to record) provided Judy with an American top ten pop hit, thereby catapulting both Judy and Joni into the big time. Joni later recorded her own version (first released on Clouds) as did countless other singers including Glen Campbell, Andy Williams and Neil Diamond among others.

Who knows where the time goes?, from 1968, represented another stylistic change, this time to a country-folk-rock sound, the instruments even including a steel guitar played by Buddy Emmons. This album features a broader range of songwriters, though still mostly steeped in the folk music tradition. This was a nine-track album, but the length of some of the tracks makes the playing time about the same as for a normal ten-track album of the era. Judy only wrote one song here (My father) but included two of Leonard Cohen's (Story of Isaac, Bird on the wire). There's also a Bob Dylan song (Poor immigrant) while the title track was written by Sandy Denny, the British singer-songwriter who first came to public attention via the Strawbs and, later and more famously, Fairport Convention. For all the brilliance of these tracks, the standout on this album is Someday soon, an Ian Tyson song that provided Judy with another American hit single. The song has become a country standard, being covered by Crystal Gayle and Suzy Bogguss among others.

These two albums represent, for some, the very best period of Judy's career. It's easy to understand why people think that way, but Judy recorded many other excellent albums that are worth hearing. If these two are Judy's best (and I'm not sure if they are), there are several others that are not far behind them.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great recordings; irresistable value., 28 Aug 2007
By 
John Williams (Apeldoorn, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
I remember listening to Judy Collins on vinyl all those years ago, and was happy to see these recordings released on CD at such irresistable prices.

Of the two albums paired here, I much prefer 'Wildflowers'. There are no dud tracks on this album, in which Judy Collins' pure, clear voice is enhanced by the semi-classical arrangements by Joshua Rifkin. I just love those small ensembles of woodwind and brass, unspoilt by intrusive drums or rhythm sections. Judy's own compositions are the weakest ones, but the Collins voice and the Rifkin arrangements make them worth listening to. Her interpretations of other writers, notably Leonard Cohen and Jacques Brel, are better. I first became aware of Jacques Brel through Judy Collins' recordings of his songs. One of them, the achingly beautiful 'La Chanson de Vieux Amants', is here, and singlehandedly makes this a worthwhile purchase.

'Who Knows Where The Time Goes' is more of a mixed bag. Songs vary from the beautiful title track and 'My Father' (possibly my favourite of Judy's self-penned compositions) to the truly atrocious ramblings of 'First Boy I Loved', with some good but unremarkable country influenced songs such as 'Some Day Soon' thrown in. The songs on this album have, on average, more twanging guitars and a stronger beat.

Several early Judy Collins albums now appear to have been re-relaeased in pairs, two on one CD. This is a great idea and equally great value for money. Perhaps it could have been even better if stylistically similar albums had been paired. There are some great tracks on 'Who Knows.....', but for 'Wildflowers' to have been paired with 'Whales and Nightingales' (more wonderful Joshua Rifkin arrangements) or 'In My Life' would have been heaven.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exquisite twofer - buy now!, 6 Sep 2006
By 
R. K. Powell (Wiltshire UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
This combination of two beautiful Judy Collins LPs on one CD is iresistible. They are superbly produced, tender and profound. She has one of the great voices and the choice of songs ranges wide. Every single one is a classic interpretation. For oldies it will be a delicious evocation of remote youth.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE DAWN OF LEONARD COHEN & JONI MITCHELL, 17 April 2010
By 
Mr. Sr Harrup "nehpetsrh" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
'Wildflowers', I tried buying the original L.P. 3 times in 1968, each time the copy was damaged (good old vynal). I finally, in frustration, exchanged it for Joni Mitchell's excellent debut album. However, I did eventually get this wonderful album, so instead of one great female artist, I now had two. I have always considered Collins & Mitchell as the best of American folk singer/songwriters and these two Judy Collins albums bring back wonderful memories. If you don't own a Judy Collins album, then buy this double now! Still reading, ok, another fact, Leonard Cohen's 'Priests' has never been released by the great man, for all I know he never even recorded it. So, for a Cohen fan, this album is a must. But that is not all, Judy Collins sings Cohen & Mitchell so well, they could be her own songs.

'Who Knoes Where The Time Goes' is one of the most beautiful songs ever written, no version can come close to Sandy Denny's Fairport Convention recording (When Sandy died, my friends and I sat around silently drinking and playing this song over and over again), Judy Collins comes closer than anyone else with her version and I cannot deny it is a beautiful recording in its own right. The rest of his album is brimming with superb recordings.

Wonderful memories of the 60's or newly discovered masterpieces, you choose, just enjoy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Since you asked, 30 July 2013
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
I`ve loved Judy Collins` voice for as long as I can remember. Less earnest than her contemporary Joan Baez, she has always sounded slightly sour as well as sweet, tart as well as tender.
I used to have the LP of Wildflowers, and a lovely thing it was and now is, coupled as it is here with the rather different Who Knows...
On Wildflowers, Judy starts with a fulsome cover of Joni Mitchell`s Michael From Mountains, a typically melodic and lyrically strong song from the then as yet unrecorded Joni. Also on this album is Joni`s signature song Both Sides Now, which was a rare hit for Judy C.
The other budding songwriter getting a timely leg-up from this prescient singer is Leonard Cohen, three of whose songs are present: Hey, That`s No Way to Say Goodbye, Sisters of Mercy, and a superb song her fellow Canadian has never himself recorded, Priests. She sings them with her usual impeccable taste and alertness to meaning and melody.
For me, the real thrill of this 1967 record is the presence of three songs by Judy herself, including the lovely Since You Asked (astoundingly, her first composition) as well as the all too brief Sky Fell, followed by the tour de force that is Albatross. I`ve long thought Judy C to be one of the most underrated songwriters around - try her album Voices, on which she sings exclusively her own songs, albeit in new piano arrangements (see my review if interested). All three songs are quite wonderful, particularly considering they are alongside songs by not only Cohen and Joni, but also the great Belgian chanteur Jacques Brel. His Le Chanson Des Vieux Amants (The Song of Old Lovers) is dramatically rendered, and one can`t help hoping Brel heard it and approved.
The following year`s Who Knows... is a more expansive affair, with the ebullient Hello, Hooray kicking off proceedings, with a brace of excellent Cohen songs, a fine Dylan song, Poor Immigrant, plucked from the then recent John Wesley Harding LP, the gently lovely Someday Soon, her lengthy version of the rather gauche First Boy I Loved by the Incredible String Band`s Robin Williamson (she naturally changed the sex from girl to boy) which I must say drags on a bit (RW`s was swifter, and the better for it), and the album closes with the traditional Pretty Polly, in a compellingly slow version.
Then there`s Judy`s own My Father, a great song - covered later by a reluctant Nina Simone, who (rightly) felt it wasn`t suitable or appropriate for her. It`s certainly just right for Judy, who makes of it a highly personal, yet no less moving, family memoir in song.
The title track is a cover of the irreplaceable Sandy Denny`s most famous song. Judy sings it as tenderly as Sandy, with almost as much subtlety and windswept desolation.
The versatile and hugely talented Joshua Rifkin`s atmospheric arrangements on many of these songs are distinctive and timeless.
With a full and unimprovable booklet, card slipcase, and replicas of both original sleeves, this two-in-one Rhino CD is not only a bargain, but a disc so packed with wonderful music I can`t recommend it too highly.

What I`ll give you since you`ve asked
is all my time together,
take the rugged sunny days
the warm and rocky weather,
take the roads that I have walked along
looking for tomorrow`s time,
peace of mind...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars exquisite, beautiful & deeply moving, 26 Dec 2007
This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
I also love these albums and like one of your other reviewers think Judy possesses one of the most beautiful and crystal clear voices of the 1960's - way better than her colleagues from the same era. Wildflowers is the purest album but I do differ with your second reviewer however. I find myself brought to tears each and every time I hear two of her own songs - SkyFell and especially Albatross. Each a deeply touching song - full of yearning, quiet sadness and wistfulness. Please listen....
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5.0 out of 5 stars Catching up with youth, 18 Feb 2014
By 
Art "Art" (Staffordshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
I bought the album of this in the 1960s and somehow it disappeared along the way.

Then I heard 'Michael from Mountains' and it call came flooding back.

Judy's crystal clear, sweet voice, the superb choice of songs, and wonderful arrangements on the songs

Definitely 5 stars!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Still great, 45 years later!, 24 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
Back in 1969, I was a student in London. I borrowed the Wildflowers vinyl record from Camden Library. I left it on a sunny windowsill and it warped. The library made me buy it. I'm glad they did, because it became one of my all time favourites. So glad to be able to buy it as a CD.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Relaxing and pleasant, 5 May 2013
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
I have always been a staunch Joan Baez fan, and thought that nobody else could match her beautiful singing. However, this is my FOURTH Judy Collins cd and I love her choice of songs, some of which are well known. She has very clear diction, some haunting melodies, and sings with meaning. I am also impressed with the guitar backing.I am often tempted to join her in a duet - when the house is empty, of course! I am sure that I shall buy more. Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ... so bought this so I can listen to a brilliant set of tracks of a singer with a brilliant ..., 6 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Audio CD)
I have the LP but no record player so bought this so I can listen to a brilliant set of tracks of a singer with a brilliant voice.
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Wildflowers/Who Knows Where The Time Goes
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