Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eyes Wide Open
This is a great documentary.
Across the course of the film, you mayhave your eyes opened as if for the first time: it comprises clips andinterviews about the history of cinematography, or indeed the whole lookand language of film.
While many of the clips show well-known moments in film, their compilationin this way offers one fresh and striking visual after...
Published on 26 April 2004 by Stuart Gibson

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Five stars for the few minutes I could bear to watch, one for the transfer.
I didn't get more that a few minutes into this before deciding to return it. Why? Because this is a documentary about the art of cinema - a subject that demands the best quality transfer. The blurb on the back cover even acknowledges this by boasting about the high definition transfers used... but what we get isn't even standard def, it's lower than that.
Why...
Published 11 months ago by Amazon Customer


Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eyes Wide Open, 26 April 2004
By 
Stuart Gibson (Surry Hills, NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a great documentary.
Across the course of the film, you mayhave your eyes opened as if for the first time: it comprises clips andinterviews about the history of cinematography, or indeed the whole lookand language of film.
While many of the clips show well-known moments in film, their compilationin this way offers one fresh and striking visual after another. Therevelation is the strength of early and rarely-seen films, and theassertion that had sound films been invented a decade later, the visuallanguage of film would have developed and intensified still further. As itis, the images are just ravishing, and it's really rather moving towatch.
This is a warm and thought-provoking look at cinematography, andis highly recommended. The only reservation is the mono sound on the DVD,but it's a small sacrifice when the visuals hold pride of place.
Be prepared -- you'll want to revisit many classics after this!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars source of inspiration, 29 Sept. 2010
By 
R. Baston (Newcastle UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
Not just a truly interesting and informative insight into the people who actually realise, the film, the Directors of Photography. Fascinating and anti ageist as most of them were mostly of 'mature years' but still going strong and enthusiastic. The other notable thing was they were all so modest and matter of fact about their talents and they "just did their jobs". without fuss or egocentricity- refreshing!
The early work, in particular demonstrated that "special effects" can't substitute for creativity and craft.
After watching it the first time one can turn it into a learning experience by just turning the sound off and studying the imagery and lighting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Five stars for the few minutes I could bear to watch, one for the transfer., 17 Aug. 2014
By 
Amazon Customer (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
I didn't get more that a few minutes into this before deciding to return it. Why? Because this is a documentary about the art of cinema - a subject that demands the best quality transfer. The blurb on the back cover even acknowledges this by boasting about the high definition transfers used... but what we get isn't even standard def, it's lower than that.
Why? Because this is a 4x3 transfer of a documentary that was made in widescreen...that is, it was transferred to DVD with old 4x3 tv screens in mind. The result is that when you play it on a modern TV, you get black bars at the sides to frame the 4x3 image, AND black bars at the top and bottom to frame the widescreen transfer within the 4x3 format. To make matter worse, many of the clips being discussed are in 4x3 so you get a SECOND set of vertical black bars at the sides when these clips are on screen. The net result is that you are watching an image in a window that takes up maybe 30 percent of your screen area. Yes, you can enlarge it, but all that does is reduce the resolution still further to the point where you may as well watch a YouTube video
It's bad enough that this disc was released in this form at a time when widescreen DVDs were already the standard, but to do it to a documentary that is about the art of cinema is compounding the felony absurdly. Watching a flat, blocky image while the narrator describes the beauty of what you're supposedly seeing is just ridiculous. Back it goes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Visions of Light: Unmissable, 22 Nov. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
Visions of Light is a great insight into the collective work that cinema is. The various DPs that are interviewed cover the realms of photography in a straightforward way. Glimpses of how they trick the light is really helpful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great film but faded illustrations, 19 Jan. 2015
By 
This review is from: Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
This is a great documentary about a side of filmmaking many viewers don't pay enough attention to. Regrettably, many of the clips, especially from the color films, are from unrestored sources and are faded and look pretty terrible. Many of these cinematographers have passed on since this documentary was made, so this film has special significance. It's definitely worthy of restoration and re-issue on Blu-Ray, but due to the limited appeal of the subject, it's doubtful that will happen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent dvd., 22 Jun. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
Great film, covers most of the top camera men espically Greg Toland, on of my favorites for his deep focus work [ i didnt realise that a number of other cameramen were trying to do the same thing around that time, Jimmie Howe for one.]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been much better, 21 Nov. 2010
By 
P. Drury (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
Though interesting in parts, this documentary lacks the depth of content to be anything more than average. The format has a 'made for TV' feel about it, dominated by short clips with bland anecdotes and yarns from old-timers, but little in the way of actual information. Worth renting maybe, but not one to buy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Visions of Light [1992] [DVD]
Visions of Light [1992] [DVD] by Arnold Glassman (DVD - 2006)
£7.75
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews