Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

  • Mott
  • Customer Reviews

Customer Reviews

16
4.6 out of 5 stars
Mott
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£3.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Mott only lasted 3 years in this form but produced two brilliant albums, Mott & The Hoople. This album contains a couple of hit singles, All the way from Memphis and Honaloochie Boogie but some of the other tracks are better, in particular, Hymn for the Dudes, Ballad of Mott and I wish I was your Mother. This album is quite absorbing and has excellent depth. Look past he singles and dig into the album at night on a good stereo. How good were Mott? Well they were highly rated by David Bowie, had Mick Ronson playing with them and Andy Mckay of Roxy Music on sax. Largely forgotten, this album is a real belter.

The demo versions are for connoisseurs mainly but may be of interest to the casual listener.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
After three albums on Island between 1970 and 1971 that saw constant touring, critical acclaim but little chart action ("Mad Shadows", "Wildlife" and "Brain Capers") – Mott The Hoople were about to throw in the towel when they finally hit paydirt with the David Bowie assisted "All The Young Dudes" LP in the heady days of 1972 (the height of Glam Rock in the UK). With the mercurial Bowie a fan and his star exploding everywhere – the timing and the song was perfect. All they needed to do was to consolidate that fresh beginning – and 1973’s "Mott" followed through in real style.

The 9-track "Mott" vinyl album was originally UK released in July 1973 on CBS Records S 69038 – and this April 2006 Columbia/Legacy CD reissue runs to 58:42 minutes. The album was originally produced by the band (with Andy McKay of Roxy Music guesting on Sax) and this CD reappraisal offers fans 4 additions – "Rose" the non-album flip of "Honaloochie Boogie", 2 previously unreleased demos of "Honaloochie Boogie" and "Nightmare" and one incendiary live version of "Drivin' Sister" recorded at the Hammersmith Odeon in 1973. Oddly the single edit of "All The Way From Memphis" is AWOL when there was plenty of room to include it.

It won’t take British fans very long to notice that the gorgeous gatefold die-cut artwork of the original 1973 UK LP with it’s centred plastic face and inner lyric bag is completely absent - sloppily replaced with reissue artwork. At least the 12-page booklet is better than the scrappy 8-page affair that afflicts the 2006 Legacy CD of 1972’s "All The Young Dudes". This time we get liner notes by Keith Smith (Editor of Two Miles From Heaven), detailed recording info, lyrics and even the D.H. Lawrence piece "A Sane Revolution" that appeared on the rear cover artwork. But the colour-photo montage that’s on inner gatefold is missing and the booklet’s impact is negligible when the original LP was a thing of beauty.

Offsetting the disappointing presentation however is the real deal - a fantastic new remaster by tape wizard VIC ANESINI whose credits include Simon & Garfunkel, Stevie Ray Vaughan, The Jayhawks, Elvis Presley, Carole King, Hall & Oates and Santana to name but a few.

It opens with the full album version of the rollicking "All The Way From Memphis" which to this day makes me smile (lyrics above). The grungy boogie of "Whizz Kid" could so easily have been a rocker on Bowie's "Ziggy Stardust" and the melodrama ballad "Hymn For The Dudes" is properly great Mott The Hoople - the "Thunderthighs" girly backing vocalists adding real power to a great song. The trio that follow "Honaloochie Boogie", "Violence" and "Drivin' Sister" show the differing song approaches of two huge talents – Ian Hunter and Mick Ralphs – both giving Mott The Hoople Rock, fun and that fabulous British Rock 'n' Roll swagger. But again it's the ballads that get you – the 1972 Live In Zurich "Ballad Of..." and the lovely acoustic strum of "I Wish I Was Your Mother" see the album finish on a real high.

The four bonus tracks are a typically mixed bag of the good and the average. Favourite is the beautiful ballad "Rose" – the non-album flip of "Honaloochie Boogie" (a long-prized Mott item). Musically as good is Verden Allen's "Nightmare" – that is until he opens his mouth and starts singing – he’s a terrible voice. The reissue finishes with the huge guitar punch of a live show opener "Drivin’ Sister” – but it’s already appeared on the 30th Anniversary issue of "Mott The Hoople Live".

So there you have it – a great album and a properly fab trip down Rock’s Memory Lane. It's a real shame that the booklet doesn’t celebrate "Mott" a bit more (an Indie label would have splashed out 20-pages or more) and a few more bonus tracks would have sweetened the deal - but at least what’s on offer is sonically brilliant (a fantastic remaster by Anesini).

Verden Allen would leave as would Mick Ralphs but with principal song-writer and singer Ian Hunter still at the helm – the band would go on to even better things with their underrated 6th LP "The Hoople" in 1974 with the gorgeous "Trudi's Song" on it (see reviews for that and "Dudes" from 1972).

Now in 2014 - this remastered "Mott" CD is cheaper than a bag of chips after the pub. Get this nugget into your home right away...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 3 March 2015
One of the most important rockband of their era. I've been listening to the band since 1973 and even in 2015 it sounds fresh and modern.
Their long musical journey is familiar to everyone who's into the history of brittish rockmusic, a brush of David Bowie, lyrics, full of meaning, sarkasm, politically teasing but most of all great fun. Wonderfully presented lyrics by Ian Hunter, you never grow tired of that voice.
I know every frase on this album. Typically low-key statements and refreshing jokes of any topics, we so much miss that approach today.
One of the strongest legacy of Mott The Hoople is their compressed, big sound of guitars, replacing violins with a dynamic and dramatic wall behind the vocalist. Nobody has been able to copy that in 40 years, the main reason the band has a personal and lasting fingerprint through the ages.
This band should be introduced into The Rock'n'Roll of Fame. Important, strong, everlasting, great musicians, deep, wonderful, ironic, never self centered, topic, modern and most of all true rock'n'rollers in every sense of the meaning.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 22 March 2013
I know the BBC should be rightly criticised for many things, including its general dumbing down, but it should also be praised for its recent music retrospectives on BBC4 - one on the great Graham Parker and The Rumour and another on this great band from rather earlier in the 1970s. I have always been of the school of thought that Mott's highpoint was the 1972 All The Young Dudes album (whilst always, of course, recognising that Mott was also a classic album), but, having been prompted by the BBC documentary to 'upgrade' my vinyl version of Mott with the CD equivalent, I am now (even more) in two minds. For example, if I take my favourite (say) six songs from each album we have: Sweet Jane, All The Young Dudes, Jerkin' Crocus, One Of The Boys, Ready For Love and Sea Diver vs. All The Way From Memphis, Hymn For The Dudes, Honaloochie Boogie, Ballad Of Mott The Hoople, I'm A Cadillac and I Wish I Was Your Mother. 12 stone cold classic songs, but presenting something of a dilemma you would no doubt agree.

No matter, what is undeniably the case is that this 1973 album is another masterpiece and that Mott saw Ian Hunter's songwriting reach new heights of maturity - albeit, Hunter's increasingly central position in the band almost certainly caused the departures of Verden Allen (prior to the recording of this album) and then Mick Ralphs (after the album's release). Hunter's song-writing has never been more poignant or reflective than it was on Mott, self-deprecating and cognisant of the fleeting and illusory nature of fame. In particular, the driving beat of opener All The Way From Memphis (written to mark their 1972 US tour and featuring the superb sax of Andy Mackay) masks the song's inner cynicism ('You look like a star but you're still on the dole'), whilst each of Hymn For the Dudes and The Ballad Of Mott The Hoople ('Rock 'n' roll's a loser's game') have similar underlying themes. On the other hand, the up-tempo Whizz Kid maintains the US-based theme, whilst each of Drivin' Sister, Honaloochie Boogie (with its killer riff) and Violence (a tongue-in-cheek piece of social commentary) continue in the vein of great rock 'n' roll. In my 20 or so years of having not listened to the album I had forgotten just how brilliant is the Mick Ralphs' composition I'm A Cadillac - one of the most infectious choruses the band ever recorded and a worthy companion piece to All The Young Dudes' Ready For Love. Did the man ever write anything approaching this quality during his time with Bad Company? - I don't think so. Then, for album closer I Wish I Was Your Mother we're back in Hunter's emotionally charged territory, with what is one of the man's greatest ever songs (mandolin intro and all).

Simply an essential album for the collection.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 17 October 2014
This is rightly considered to be one of the great rock records and is one that I have always loved.

I saw the band 2 years before the release of this classic album and they were incredible live. This has the feel of a live album for the point of view of the energy, tight musicianship and sheer determination on the part of all the musicians to make this as superb as it is.

Ian's lyrics are among the most wry and honest he ever produced - a slightly jaundiced view of the rock world but I guess ultimately enjoying the benefits brought by the massive up turn in their career, helped by Bowie;s famous injection of All The Young Dudes.

The album has a swagger that is hard to match, allied to superb playing and a clear joy in delivery. I never get tired of listening to this and it puts a lot of other acts to shame. Mott were never as good. From earlier albums, my favourite of Brain Capers but I love this record. The bonus tracks are just that - a welcome bonus, especially Rose.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 9 April 2013
i had this album in liverpool before it was stolen by burglars. Outstanding album and at this price an absolute steal.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 June 2013
This is Mott the Hoople at their finest, and one of the best records of the 70's. Glamorous, tough, eclectic, romantic .. and lots more besides.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 8 September 2012
Had this album on release 40 years ago , in fact original in garage with all my other plastic. I can't stop playing this as it seems better than i remembered.
If i had to pick out any stand out tracks they would be.... all except violence which does now seem to be slightly dated.
If you want a classic album from the seventies from a band on top form that still sounds fresh then you will not regret this purchase.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
17 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 23 April 2006
This is a classic rock album. Superb music. Just downright great. If you don't own it then there's something seriously wrong with you and you probably listen to Robbie Williams a lot! However, the nice little tempter of 'expanded edition' is a bit hollow on close inspection. And this is true for all three Sony Legacy Mott the Hoople re-releases. The extra tracks have all been previously available, either on the now lost box set or the expanded Ariel Bender-era live album. And, on that subject, where is the logic in putting live bonus tracks featuring Ariel Bender on an album that features Mick Ralphs? The same is true of the re-release of All The Young Dudes.

It's always nice to be able to get hold of these same tracks a few times over, but given the number of Mott the Hoople rarities that still seem to be lurking, it's a real lost opportunity. Just like the Ian Hunter 'All American Alien Boy' recent re-release. Pandering to our cousins across the Atlantic again....
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 3 June 2013
I like it a lot and will keep going back to it. Ziggy and Diamond Dogs fans will probably enjoy it too. Caught the BBC doc about the band and if that ever became available to download I thoroughly recommend it. Fascinating insight in to (and out of) hedonism.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Roll Away The Stone: The Best Of
Roll Away The Stone: The Best Of by Mott The Hoople (Audio CD - 2008)

Greatest Hits
Greatest Hits by Mott the Hoople (Audio CD - 1990)

The Hoople
The Hoople by Mott the Hoople (Audio CD - 2006)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.