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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars why has noone being ranting praise over this album yet?!
Rarely inspired to write reviews, I saw that noone had said anything on the fantastic Tilly and the Wall and felt the need to re-right the balance of the universe. I bought this album off the back of a playlist by Michael Stipe of REM who had put Night Of The Living Dead on his top 10. That was two months ago and I pretty much haven't stopped playing this, I dont...
Published on 11 Feb. 2006 by F. S. Mcdonald

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 93' Til Infinity
Released in the States on Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst’s label, Team Love, Tilly & The Wall’s full-length debut, Wild Like Children, finally gets a release in the UK, thanks to Moshi Moshi.
For the uninitiated, the roots of T&TW lie in a band called Park Ave., which was one of Oberst’s more prolific pre-Bright Eyes efforts. In fact,...
Published on 13 Feb. 2006 by J. W. Bassett


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars why has noone being ranting praise over this album yet?!, 11 Feb. 2006
This review is from: WILD LIKE CHILDREN (Audio CD)
Rarely inspired to write reviews, I saw that noone had said anything on the fantastic Tilly and the Wall and felt the need to re-right the balance of the universe. I bought this album off the back of a playlist by Michael Stipe of REM who had put Night Of The Living Dead on his top 10. That was two months ago and I pretty much haven't stopped playing this, I dont need to trouble myself with skipping the bad songs because there arent any, and I dont need to think about what mood im in and reflect it accordingly with my choice of music on my ipod because this album is just as perfect for when your getting ready to go out and when you wake up in the morning feeling like you have been unsed to unclog the blender.
Mainly female vocals, Tilly and The Wall includes a tap dancer who tapdances to the rhythms of the songs. It's amazing. If you aren't sure, then the songs to (legally!) download to check it out are:
You and I Misbehaving - the night before
I Always Knew - the morning after
But like I say, from beginning to end it's really really painfully good. Its a mystery to me that every man and his dog owns Death Cab and Modest Mouse and noone knows about Tilly. Buy it if you like Rilo Kiley, Sleepy Jackson, or the more upbeat of Saddle Creek artists. For that matter, just buy it anyway, if you hate it you can always give it to one of your musically superior friends
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars why has noone being ranting praise over this album yet?!, 9 Dec. 2005
rarely inspired to write reviews, i saw that noone had said anything on the fantastic Tilly and the Wall and felt the need to re-right the balance of the universe. I bought this album off the back of a playlist by Michael Stipe of REM who had put Night Of The Living Dead on his top 10. That was two months ago and I pretty muc hhavent stopped playing this, I dont need to trouble myself with skipping the bad songs because there arent any, and I dont need to think about what mood im in and reflect it accordingly with my choice of music on my ipod because this album is just as perfect for when your getting ready to go out and when you wake up in the morning feeling like you have been unsed to unclog the blender.
Mainly female vocals, Tilly and The Wall includes a tap dancer who tapdances to the rhythms of the songs. Its amazing. If you arent sure, then the songs to (legally!) download to check it out are:
You and I Misbehaving - the night before
I Always Knew - the morning after
But like I say, from beginning to end its really really painfully good. Its a mystery to me that every man and his dog owns Death Cab and Modest Mouse and noone knows about Tilly. Buy it if you like Rilo Kiley, Sleepy Jackson, or the more upbeat of Saddle Creek artists. For that matter, just buy it anyway, if you hate it you can always give it to one of your musically superior friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars We will be wild like children, 12 Feb. 2006
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: WILD LIKE CHILDREN (Audio CD)
If Bright Eyes, Rilo Kiley and Of Montreal had a head-on collision, the result might be something like Tilly and the Wall. Their oddball debut, "Wild Like Children," is best described as bright, childlike pop-rock set to dark, slightly cynical songwriting. In other words, enjoyably weird.
It opens with a charming mix of acoustic guitar, keyboards and... tap dancing? It sounds like applauding hands, but the poppy "Fell Down the Stairs" has tap dancing here and there. It adds to the cheery feel of the music. Things get grittier in songs like "Nights of the Living Dead," a groaning rock-song with calls of "I wanna f*ck it up! I wanna f*ck it up!" at the end.
After that comes "Bessa," which is pretty much straightforward folk music -- it sounds just a wee bit too catchy to be coffeehouse material. But the folky-poppy sound continues in most of the other songs, from the percussion-led "You And I Misbehaving" to the piano-pop "I Always Knew." The finale is a fifteen-minute opus that could have easily been chopped in half -- part is tap-dancey pop, and part is a plaintive ballad.
The first few songs of this album are a bit uneven -- it sounds like Tilly and the Wall are getting their act together. But when Derek Pressnal ominously intones, "Don't let the daytime get you down/'Cause we will be wild like children/once the black has veiled the sky," you know that they have hit their strange little stride.
The music seems like the best mix of gritty indierock and twee pop -- the tap-dancing, piano and acoustic guitar are reminiscent of catchy, whimsical folk-pop bands. And the vocals back that up -- Kianna Alarid, Derek Pressnal and Neely Jenkins harmonize their voices almost flawlessly. It feels like you're sitting in a park at night, listening to a raw little band performing.
The twee edge of the music isn't really reflected in the lyrics, however. They're anything but twee, despite their nonsensical nature -- after the grimy tone of "Night of the Living Dead," the songs settle into a downbeat groove of dancing, "daydream lies," and determination to cling to love. The finale has perhaps the best writing of all: "Well I swear you came in the form of rain/that had frozen somewhere along its way/through the evening sky/so the trees got tired and laid on the ground...."
There are some kinks to be worked out of Tilly and the Wall's music, but this strange little band overflows with musical promise. And if "Wild Like Children" is any indication, they'll start off shaky but blossom.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Wild Like Children, 15 July 2009
By 
Spider Monkey (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: WILD LIKE CHILDREN (Audio CD)
I first heard Tilly and the wall when I bought their `O' album and although this is in the same vein I have to say `O' is slightly more accessible for that first listen. Saying that, you get the same distinctive sound with unique tap dancing/hand clapping percussion and catchy songwriting. This is another short, but perfectly crafted album and the opening track `Fell Down the Stairs' is strangely infectious and a great way to lead you into the rest of this album. This is a band that isn't afraid to be different and they make original, fun and catchy music. I'm sure, like me, that once you buy one album you'll soon be hunting down more. Slightly kooky and great fun.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A highlight of 2006 (sort of!!)., 21 Feb. 2006
This review is from: WILD LIKE CHILDREN (Audio CD)
Like Rilo Kiley, Azure Ray, Maria Taylor, Jenny Lewis and the Wilson Twins, and The Desaparecidos, Tilly and the Wall are part of the Saddle Creek/Team Love collective headed by Bright Eyes' singer/songwriter Corner Oberst. Like the members of those bands, many of the band members here have collaborated with Bright Eyes in the past, with at least half of the principle members having originally been members of Oberst's pre-fame band Park Ave., whilst vocalist Neely Jenkins famously lent backing vocals to the first Bright Eyes album, 1998's Letting Off the Happiness. Like that album, Wild Like Children is a collection of innocent enough, lo-fi indie pop anthems, sprinkled lightly with a touch of teen angst and a reflective nostalgia, and captured in a suitably shambolic fashion on a set of Casio keyboards and strummed acoustic guitars.
The sound of Wild Like Children is generally less melodramatic and self-pitying than Oberst's own (better known) work, with Tilly and the Wall favouring a chiming pop sound replete with bubbling keyboard melodies, hand claps, boy/girl call and response backing vocals, scattering percussion and the tap dancing prowess of Jamie Williams!! The substitution of a real "rock" drummer in favour of a tap dancer isn't as damaging as you might imagine, with Tilly... overcoming the novelty factor to instil their songs with a propulsive beat and a finger tapping rhythm. You only have to listen to the insanely catchy Nights of the Living Dead to see how the clamouring cacophony of percussive effects merging with the rat-a-tat-tat of the tap gives the song an endlessly catchy edge to juxtapose nicely alongside the screaming teen angst vocals and lyrics. Further proof of the tap dancing greatness can be found in the fantastic single Reckless, which was reason enough for me to buy the album just on the strength of this one, three-minute dose of pure pop genius, with guitarist/backing-vocalist Derek Pressnall taking six simple strummed chords and laying them alongside the layers of chiming keyboard melodies and counter-melodies, which further blur alongside the swathes of sweet vocals and the vague yet evocative lyrics.
Along with the album as a whole, I'd cite Reckless as one of the standout singles of 2006 (sort of... the album was released in 2004 in the US, and is now finally getting a UK release in preparation for a European tour and the obligatory second album!!), with the simple melodies and the surprisingly perky vocals (masking a song that is actually quite a downbeat depiction of the follies of growing up) setting something a benchmark for the rest of the album. Other highlights include the opening track, Fell Down the Stairs, which has a similar integration of the jangly acoustic strum with the lo-fi analogue keyboards, and the lyrics that seem to yearn for the innocence of adolescence, as viewed through the lost and cynical eyes of a group rapidly approaching their mid-twenties (I can relate!!)... whilst the song Bessa strips away some of the keyboards and the over-reliance on the tap to create something that is closer to the "twee" school of acoustic indie-pop, recalling bands like Camera Obscura, and so on.
The album holds together exceedingly well, stickingly closely to the template established by Fell Down the Stairs and Reckless, though occasionally deviating slightly with the aforementioned Bessa, as well as Let it Rain, which has a mellow alt-country flavour replete with cello bass lines and a tinkling piano, whilst A Perfect Fit has a more electro-pop sound, which is reminiscent of the songs from Oberst's Digital Ash in the Digital Urn album from 2005... only better!! The final song is really two songs linked by a long piece of studio atmos (or should that be living room atmos??, since the album was recorded in Stephen Pedersen's house by Pedersen and Oberst), which is a little bit of a stretch (two, three minute songs, linked by about eight minutes of muffled conversation and disparate instrumental clanging), so it might be best to just listen to the first half of the song proper, before hitting the skip button to take you to the end.
Wild Like Children is a fine little debut album from an interesting band who will certainly be on my list of acts to look out for over the coming year. Tilly and the Wall make bright, sparkly, toe-tapping pop for the cynics amongst us... writing songs about wanting to be seventeen again and loosing yourself in the nostalgic allure of late night drinking sessions, hanging out, falling in love, and generally not having a (serious) care in the world. So, a highlight of 2006 from 2004, then? Well, I'd say so.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 93' Til Infinity, 13 Feb. 2006
By 
J. W. Bassett (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: WILD LIKE CHILDREN (Audio CD)
Released in the States on Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst’s label, Team Love, Tilly & The Wall’s full-length debut, Wild Like Children, finally gets a release in the UK, thanks to Moshi Moshi.
For the uninitiated, the roots of T&TW lie in a band called Park Ave., which was one of Oberst’s more prolific pre-Bright Eyes efforts. In fact, it’s fair to say that anyone already aware of Park Ave. will be instantly familiar with T&TW, for Wild Like Children boasts little but sugary, pointedly ramshackle, yet relentlessly infectious sing-along pop.
Helping push them over the barrier of standard indie-pop are an array of tight arrangements, focused song-writing, glossy production and a tap-dancing percussionist. Yes, you read that last bit correctly.
T&TW forgo a drummer and allow Jaime Williams’ tap-dancing to provide the rhythmic backing. While it sounds like a horribly throwaway gimmick at first, it actually makes sense. Williams thunders out staccato clusters that would be impossible to replicate on drums and, furthermore, it lends the jangly pop a martial demeanour that hoists the band well above their more traditional indie-pop peers.
Meanwhile, the switching of male and female vocals may initially be confusing, but it leaves the album sounding fresh and consistent. Besides, T&TW split their time so intelligently and so equally between youthful distress and jubilation that Wild Like Children is only ever a heartfelt and sophisticated coming-of-age document.
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WILD LIKE CHILDREN
WILD LIKE CHILDREN by Tilly and the Wall (Audio CD - 2006)
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