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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Weirder than most
After the success of "Kimono my House" followed so quickly by "Propaganda", strange tales surfaced in the then music press of two previous Sparks LPs which had had no singles action and had not caused a ripple amongst my then 12 and 13 year old pals. Being totally caught by Ron's stationary dancing at the keyboard and Russell's manic dancing everywhere I ordered a copy of...
Published on 2 Sep 2006 by Cpl Skidmark

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3.0 out of 5 stars The true sound of the early '70s LA underground
Sparks' second album - A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing, very much follows in the same vein as it's predecessor and is just as strong. My highlights include the opening tale of xenophobic parents Girl From Germany, the intense Moon Over Kentucky (which sounds like Fantômas 25 years prior to said band, no wonder Mike Patton is a Mael fan) and Do Re Mi - an absolutely frantic...
Published 3 months ago by Tim


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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Weirder than most, 2 Sep 2006
By 
This review is from: A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing (Audio CD)
After the success of "Kimono my House" followed so quickly by "Propaganda", strange tales surfaced in the then music press of two previous Sparks LPs which had had no singles action and had not caused a ripple amongst my then 12 and 13 year old pals. Being totally caught by Ron's stationary dancing at the keyboard and Russell's manic dancing everywhere I ordered a copy of each of these hitherto unrecognised wonders.

The first album, "Sparks" is not the subject of this review, but it was not what I had expected. Slower, less electric, less "pop". Odd. Intensely catchy, but odd.

Then I put on "Woofer". I HATED it.

Two years later, I played it again (I was 17 by now and the Sex Pistols were happening). Why did I remember this album so bleakly? Was it the very monotone, one chord feel of "Girl from Germany"? Was it the pure perversity of "Angus Desire"? Was it the utterly silly rock of "Do - Re - Mi"? I could not bring to mind what had made me, aged 15, dislike this so intensely, as it now sounded defiantly weird, flying against as much of pop music and cool as it possibly could. Seriously, I now think that this album is one of the absolute masterpieces of Ron & Russ' long and interesting (and weird) career. More musical and less repetitive than "Li'l Beethoven", less widescreen than "Hello Young Lovers", but as far away from the mainstream as either of the two most recent albums.

This is a wonderful record. Not immediate, but it grows on you. Still one of my favourites more than 30 years on.

Please buy it.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This is a great album!, 4 Feb 2006
This review is from: A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing (Audio CD)
Their 2nd album contains a number of absolute gems and only avoids getting 5 stars because the new releases are even better. All the usual subjects are covered, you know - racially intolerant parents, bestiality, consumer rage, flagellation, immortality and a view of a certain art gallery through the eyes of one of the exhibits, while Here Comes Bob precedes the film, Crash, by some 30 years. It also contains the kind of chamber accompaniment they would return to in their work with Tony Visconti. Plenty of crunchy guitar bits and thundering drums and it will seem weird playing the atmospheric Moon Over Kentucky (where lunar abuse prompts Russell to suggest our nearest neighbour "leave this mooring and seek some new rendezvous" followed by some absolutely heavenly singing) without having to turn the disc over afterwards. Batteries Not Included reflects every child's frustration before consumer law was changed and shows a lyrical interest in catch-phrases that would reappear in 2002's "Your Call Is Very Important to Us, Please Hold". The only "ordinary" song on here is Earl Mankey's "Underground", where heavy sets lurk and jazz-folk-rock fusion appeals to the teens. All this and The Sound of Music! Produced by the Electric Prunes' James Lowe. Buy it while you can before it disappears again. Nothing, no nothing, is sacred anymore!!
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3.0 out of 5 stars The true sound of the early '70s LA underground, 10 April 2014
By 
Tim "Tim" (Belfast, Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
Sparks' second album - A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing, very much follows in the same vein as it's predecessor and is just as strong. My highlights include the opening tale of xenophobic parents Girl From Germany, the intense Moon Over Kentucky (which sounds like Fantômas 25 years prior to said band, no wonder Mike Patton is a Mael fan) and Do Re Mi - an absolutely frantic Rodgers And Hammerstein cover. It's hard to imagine there being anyone else remotely like Sparks in 1973.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Early Sparks, 30 Aug 2006
By 
Steven LeBeau - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing (Audio CD)
I wasn't sure whether three or four stars was appropriate, but since this is Sparks after all, I'll err in their favor.

While many of the songs are great on this album ("Girl From Germany" and "Here Comes Bob" are the standouts), most of them are merely good. (The same can be said of their first album). Ron Mael had the 'weird' part of the equation, but not the 'hooky' or 'poppy' side. Russel wasn't singing in a faux-british accent (though he does do a faux-German!) quite as much as he would on their first two albums for Island.

But this is an album to own. If you like Sparks' Island stuff, this isn't too far removed. (Much closer than the stuff on their Todd Rundgren-produced debut). My only real 'complaint' with this edition is that it could have included the original guitar-version of "I Like Girls", a song that later ended up on Big Beat. (You can hear the original version I speak of on Rhino's 2CD Sparks Compilation, "Profile: The Ultimate Sparks Collection."
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deserves more attention and respect!, 23 Feb 2013
By 
Richard Steel (West Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing (Audio CD)
Considering this initialy came out the same year as Bowie's Ziggy Stardust album, I would say this was the better album!

Going from sound engineer on their 1st LP James Lowe Produced & engineered this one himself with much pride. The 'sound on this record could easily sit alongside the like of any T. rex release of the same period. This is amongst my very favourite Sparks albums. I didn't hear it 'till 1973 and to the ears of a 13 year old. It was always a disappointment and puzzlement why the Sparks fans of '74 who bought Kimono My House and Propaganda, didn't pick up on and buy these two earlier albums. Neither would EVER reach the UK album charts!! I especialy like these albums with Ron before the swept back Chaplin/Hitler/Zaper-esquue hair and tash.
George Vogal arranged the Strings on 'Here Comes Bob.' Kip Tulin, there then 15 year old brother of Mark Tulin(Bass player with The Electric Prunes, played the accordian on 'Beaver O'Lindy.'

The band line-up on this and Sparks, to this day I say is the best there's been.
Track writing credits:
Girl From Germany (Russell Mael/Ron Mael)
Beaver O' Lindy (Ron Mael, Russell Mael, Earle Mankey, Jim Mankey, Harley Feinstein)
Nothing Is Sacred (Ron Mael)
Here Comes Bob (Ron Mael/Russell Mael)
Moon Over Kentucky (Jim Mankey/Ron Mael)

Do Rei Mi (Richard Rogers & Oscar Hammerstein III)
Angus Desire (Ron Mael/Russell Mael)
Underground (Earle Mankey)
The Louvre (Ron Mael)
Batteries Not Included (Ron Mael)
Whippings and Apologies (Ron mael)

After this version of Sparks split later in '73, Harley went to law school,
Earle became a studio engineer and later much respected underground producer, working with the likes of The Runaways to Helen Reddy. Jim took things hard and would not emerge into music world till joining up with Jonette Napolitano, forming Dream 6 and then Concrete Blonde with albums that would supass anything Sparks could manage.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars From early beginings, 11 Jan 2006
By 
Nick H (Lytham St Annes, Lancashire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing (Audio CD)
I bought the original import version soon after I heard "Kimomo My House". It was their second album but be warned it is not in the same style although it is easy listening for the most part.
The style seems, on the whole, to be basic pop without many of the clever lyrics which they use in most of their later songs
Girl From Germany is my favourite, Simple Ballet, Underground and Here Comes Bob are a complete mix of song styles but there are some songs which could easily have been left out-for example Do Re Mi is a fast rocky version of the Sound Of Music which doesn't really suit, nor does Whippings and Apologies. Batteries Not Included show the batteries were running out on this one (it only lasts a few seconds).
If you like Sparks you will not be dissapointed but there are much better albums of theirs out there.
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A Woofer In Tweeter's Clothing by Sparks (Audio CD - 2006)
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