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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Green Street
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening...
Published on 18 Mar 2012 by wizard

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious
I shake my head in disbelief at the people on this page praising this film up. But then again, i shouldnt really be surprised at all should i? Anyway, i digress. The film......well, where to start? pathetic doesnt even come close. A typical middle-class film-school students take on 'cockney geezers' fronted by a real life geordie (charlie hunman) talking in the funniest...
Published on 14 Aug 2008 by the lone voice of reason


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Green Street, 18 Mar 2012
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars when to stand up for yourself and when to walk away, 9 Nov 2006
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious, 14 Aug 2008
I shake my head in disbelief at the people on this page praising this film up. But then again, i shouldnt really be surprised at all should i? Anyway, i digress. The film......well, where to start? pathetic doesnt even come close. A typical middle-class film-school students take on 'cockney geezers' fronted by a real life geordie (charlie hunman) talking in the funniest cockney accent since dick van dyke. The fight scenes? as usual, straight out of the batman TV series. The dialogue? So incredibly cliched that i was truly cringing at the horror of it all. Elijah wood? not a bad actor, but what possessed him to appear in this abomination of a film i do not know - maybe he needed the money? He must be cowering at the memory of it all.

You wanna know the funniest thing about this film? Its in the the title 'green street'. Green street is indeed where west hams ground is. But have you ever been to green street boys and girls......? Green street and the surroundings areas are almost 100% pakistani/bengali/bangladeshi!!!! yep thats right - the whole area is run by and dominated by these people, who must snigger and chuckle at all the silly white boys who commute into the area on a saturday afternoon to watch their silly football team and shout about 'we are east london'! before all rushing back to where they live in essex after the game. Ho hum, what a laugh it all is. In fact i dont know what is more pathetic, this film or the real life 'cockney geezers' it was inspired by. United! United!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars storming, 4 Oct 2006
By 
sean paul mccann "mccanns23" (ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Football hooliganism is neither big nor clever but it happens,most teams have a crew that fight opposing crews,it isnt usually crews fighting innocent fans,its usually arranged,i aint gonna say i encourage it,im a liverpool fan and if the liverpool fans asked me to join a crew i would say spin on and have a good day,im there for the game and the fun and not a beating,anyway!

Green street focuses on a gang called green street elite who are west ham united fans who aim to cause pain for the love of their club,hardly heroic,but it makes for good cinema at least.

Elijah wood stars as an american who is wrongly kicked out of harvard and to avoid a lecture from his proud father,goes to london to visit his sister who has married a london geezer as they are called.There elijah befriends pete who is a mad cockney,albeit with poor accent,who brings elijah into the manic and deprived world of football hooliganism.

The film i suspect tries to make you feel sorry for footie hooligans as its about honour and pride but its hard to feel sorry for someone who just headbutted and broke some guys face,but there is a moral here regardless.

The film is violent,fast paced and most of all eshilarating,you must own this if violence is your cup of tea.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good., 19 Mar 2012
When I started watching this, I never thought that I'd find myself feeling any sympathy for the hooligans portrayed whatsoever; they all appeared violent and disgusting, and it was simply that. But, astonishingly, the film is competent in it's presentation of their actions more as an addiction, and through it's gritty, brutal fights, never glamourises the horrific nature of the violence. It does stretch it slightly when it asks us to feel sympathy for one particular character, as the film dives headfirst into cliches of redemption in it's final act, but it never ignores the cosequences of hooliganism, nor the accountability of it's characters. Yes, Elijah Wood is entirely unconvincing, even raising a few unintentional laughs as he giggles somewhat pathetically amongst a group of burly men - less his fault than whoever chose to cast him in the role - so the standout performance here is that of Charlie Hunnam; ignore the poor English accent, and his character is both likable and surprisingly complex. In short, it's worth a watch - even if you loathe football like myself - as a competent drama/thriller, let down only by it's third act reliance on cliches, and a distracting lead performance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it, 23 Oct 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
i'm suprised this film isn't rated alot higher than what it is, it's a very good film, pretty intense at times and Elijah Wood does a good job, i've only seen him in Lord of the rings before this, great film!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant film!, 4 July 2011
With a good story line and some really decent acting.,.this is 1 u could watch more than once. if your in to this kind of movie. 10/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gripping, 24 Nov 2010
By 
Miss E. Chambers "Atheistic Pagan" (Newcastle upon Tyne, england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
this is real, hard-hitting, it's gritty, it draws you into the dram and excitement.
Anyone who likes english football, anyone who has city blood in them will appreciate this film.

It's not all fighting and football though, there's good acting and good storylines about family, friends, different cultures and loyalty.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars White Van Smasher, 1 Mar 2010
By 
Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles "FIST" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The plot? More holes than the sinking of the Belgrano.

Worked with Millwall hard men for over 15 years, albeit when the football violence stopped and the drugs/alcohol took over. The ability to resort to violence was never delayed by "rules". The American angle is another add on, obviously to try and give it a wider audience and explain English soccer culture to the folk of Winsconsin.

There are elements which raise it above the silly. The relationhip between Bovver and the leader of the gang has a certain undertow of tension, loyalty and belonging. Although the accent slips and slides, the relationship twists with a loss of status, needing to keep up the front with more masculine shows, strikes a chord with the violent men of Bermondsey, Rotherhite, Deptford and West Ham, Poplar, Barking and Stepney I have known over the years.

Old Kent Rd, away from the football, was marked with constant gang fights between white hard men arranging rows. White trainers show the blood, but Reeboks have been a de rigeur white working class foot item for the past twenty years. At least they weren't wearing Dr. Martins.

There are pubs like the one depicted in the film. People do stand on tables, throw beer and sing "battle" songs. Its called the "George" and its in Bermondsey. Not places for the feint of heart. There are a number of whitexploitation films and this is part of the genre. It tries to depict white working class life.

It's not based on reality. Show me a film that is; Die Hard, Shining, Apocalypse Now, Saw I-V? There is a need to package white working class life as something from what it is; Eastenders, Coronation Street, Shameless. They all have the same centre of disbelief as Green Street.

The film does not explain the reasons for the violence, other than it becomes addictive. As Frodo becomes enticed into the world of rucking he begins to enjoy it for the adrenaline rush, the sense of camaraderie and the power. There is a pay off as anyone involved in a gang gains status, friends and respect. An escape from cultural anonimity, to become someone for a few hours per week.

There are always other hard men who can take the crown, so it all depends who can portray and sustain the role of being the biggest "nutter". These men were produced en masse in the households of the 50/60/70/80's UK when fathers punched their sons onto the street to become strutting men. The film should portray this rite of passage, Major punching the old man sparko as adolescent, for it to be "real".

However it's not Nil By Mouth. It's just a B Movie and should be appreciated for what it is, rather than what it could have been. They will never get it right because the real story is too raw.

Then it would have to show the complete failure of a social system. Ouch!!!!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No Hobbits Wanted, 23 Feb 2010
By 
P. Frizelle (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Expelled from Harvard, journalism student Matt (Wood) heads to London to stay with his married sister Shannon (Claire Forlani). As he plans his next move he falls in with her charismatic brother-in-law Pete (Hunnam), a well-respected teacher and dedicated Hammers fan who proudly leads his club's infamous Green Street Elite or GSE, a team of West Ham supporting hooligans who enjoy nothing more than a few pints and a vicious fight with opposing fans. Soon enough Matt is embroiled in their world and kicking heads in with the best of them, both on the streets of London and around the country. Reputation is everything, as Pete strives for the GSE to be the most feared and infamous firm in England. Matt soon becomes addicted to the adrenaline-fuelled intensity of a post-match scrap and the boozy camaraderie of his new circle of friends. But Pete's right-hand man Bovver (Leo Gregory) doesn't take kindly to this Yank interloper and secretly plots his downfall.
Their hatred of journalists forces Matt to conceal his background, but for how long? As events builds towards a showdown with their most hated foes, the Millwall firm, family loyalties and personal vendettas threaten to spiral out of control and end in tragedy. Director Lexi Alexander punctuates her film with extended fight sequences that boast a bruising, muscular authenticity. Sadly, nothing else rings true in an often comical drama that, like Nick Love's The Football Factory before it, obscenely glamorises senseless violence. There's a great movie about hooliganism and its place in working-class male culture. It's called The Firm, and Alan Clarke made it in 1988. Green Street is a surefire target for the ban-this-filth brigade but, unless you're a delicate flower who is offended by a bit of f'ing and c'ing, there's really nothing worth getting excited about. The question should be: why are we supposed to be interested in the lives of these morons? Repetition soon sets in, as we go from the pub to a battle and back to the pub. The fights themselves are suitably ragged and impacting, but we never get to know Matt and therefore have no idea why he would want to associate with a bunch of pissed up thugs. The suggestion seems to be that they offer a sense of family and belonging, something that has been absent in Matt's life, and that he identifies with their dubious code of loyalty.

It's a brave and ambitious role for Wood to take on, and he does his best, but he's ill served by the malnourished screenplay that offers no explanation for Matt's transformation and no real character arc. Forlani is totally wasted while Hunnam struggles with a sub Dick Van Dyke accent and doesn't really convince as a hard nut. The most effective stuff comes from Gregory who brings such a snivelling vibe to his role as the treacherous Bover that you could sometimes swear you were watching the young Klaus Kinski.

American journalist Matt Buckner (Elijah Wood) finds himself firmly planted in the Upton Park mayhem when he arrives in England to stay with sister Shannon (Claire Forlani). Buckner's expulsion from Harvard - the result of taking a fall for his coke-addicted room-mate - is, along with his profession, kept secret from brother-in-law Steve(Marc Warren) and Pete (Charlie Hunnam); the self-styled 'top boy' in West Ham's Green Street Elite. Although Buckner receives a mostly hostile reception from this ultra-violent firm, the picture changes when a fierce encounter with Birmingham's mob sees him emerge with credit for standing his ground.As the film proceeds, Buckner gets deeper and deeper into the shadowy world of football violence, gaining respect from all but one of his fellow members: Bover (Leo Gregory) becomes jealous of Buckner's relationship with Pete and travels deep into the territory of the Hammers' biggest rivals, but for what reason?

Green Street Hooligans is the worst kind of exploitative filmmaking masquerading as art. Adopting every conceivable cliché associated with the sociopathic aspects of football hooliganism, it's about as realistic as Shrek, but far less entertaining. One clue to its irrelevance is its timing, or lack thereof. While hooliganism has not exactly disappeared, it's thankfully no longer as pervasive as it once was, which makes a film that purports to explore the loyalty and honour amongst hooligans as redundant as it is misguided.

Quite why Elijah Wood felt compelled to take the role of Matt Buckner, a Harvard journalism student who trades the American Ivy league for the English football league, is a mystery. Unless, along with his role of a cannibal in Sin City, he is trying to shed his cuddly Frodo image for something darker. Whatever his reasons, Wood does an admirable job under the circumstances and it's certainly not his fault Green Street Hooligans is so woeful. Elijah Wood, a pint-sized, baby-faced actor who makes the least plausible hooligan in cinema history. One other key factor is the miscast performance of Charlie Hunnam as Pete Dunham, the head of West Ham's GSE (Green Street Elite). Cropped hair and a cute smile does not a convincing thug make. Best known for his portrayal of a gay teenager in Queer As Folk, Hunnam lacks the threat or authority of someone who heads one of the toughest "firms" in the country. He swaggers about like Liam Gallagher and adopts a cockney accent that would make Dick Van Dyke wince. Together they capsize a well-intentioned but ultimately calamitous attempt to analyse the so-called "English disease".

With the GSE being based on West Ham's notorious ICF (Inter City Firm), the club were approached by the filmmakers who wanted to shoot scenes at their Upton Park ground. Being given the impression the film was celebrating the glorious game and its fanatical supporters, they agreed. They later discovered the film's true take on the subject and disassociated themselves from the project. By which time it was too late. No one else should make the same mistake.

This film is only good for a rainy Sunday afternoon and like so many hooligan films there is a vein of Bromance holding the whole thing together. It's a brave attempt but is unconvincing. #

It is however better than The Firm (2009) and Awaydays, and far better than Green Street 2 and 3. The best of this recent bunch of films is Danny Dyers Football Factories.

Give this film a wide birth, its contrived and unconvincing and you never really get to know the characters
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