Customer Reviews

2
5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 9 February 2006
This is what you get when you have two masters collaborate. Gasparyian without a doubt is the master of duduk and a proponent of Armenian music. It is just amazing how the two cultures meet and how wonderfully the sound of duduk complements Persian music. Album is recorded live in Iran and it is full of atmospheric poetic soft music that Iran is so famous for. Alizadeh is a master of Tar and Setar. Here he introduces a new Persian instrument he calls ShurAngiz which is a variation of Iran's Oud. Well worth every penny. Also do look up others from the label Hermes. Seems a very interesting one.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Even if you have no idea what a duduk is, you will very likely have heard one. Ever since Hollywood discovered it a few years back it has become a soundtrack staple, and producers go straight to flick through the Djivan Gaspayan albums when they want "mournful". Armenian Gasparyan is the master of that country's distinctive instrument, a double reed woodwind piece.

Iranian master tar and setar player Hossein Alizadeh and his ensemble 'Hamavayan' come together in a bi-cultural musical collaboration with Gaspayan and two attendant duduk players in this live recording made in Tehran in 2003. Here Alizadeh is listed as playing a "shourangiz" which is apparently a new creation by Alizadeh himself, a new specification of instrument based upon the setar but with more strings and longer fingerboard with more frets.

There are a wide variety of styles displayed here. The opening piece, a stunning 22 minute epic called "Birds" features two female vocalists who almost seem like they are each wailing their own individual lament - I almost imagine it being some kind of funeral valediction for some departed ancient Caucasian hero. The reality may well be more prosaic, but in the absence of any supplied lyric translations I cannot tell otherwise.

This is followed by a duduk improvisation from Gasparyan and chums, then an ensemble piece plus duduk with two male & two female vocalists including a male/female duet - the track listing indicates that the lyrics here are a mix of Azeri, Armenian and Farsi. This piece, "Sari Gelin", is apparently a folk tune whose melody is known throughout the middle East from Turkey through to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iraq and Iran, with locally supplied lyrics but in each case telling a Romeo & Juliet type story of a marriage across boundaries. An ensemble instrumental is then followed by a mournful duduk piece with male vocal. Alizadeh then improvises a solo on shourangiz, before the programme concludes with a rousing everybody-joining-in composition featuring the lyrics of Rumi.

The accompanying booklet (at least in the edition with the photo of birds flying over mountains on the cover - there are two editions with different covers) is mostly a photo gallery and lyrics in Farsi, but no translations sadly.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.