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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And the dog's bollocks in aspect to follow please.
Well, as usual for me I come to this movie well behind the herd since I only just saw it. Viewed this far down the line, frankly all the fuss that's been made about it strikes me as a bit daft.

Apart from the fact that it ditches a conventional narrative it seems to contain all the elements typifying a standard Guy Ritchie flick: memorable larger-than-life...
Published 8 months ago by Richard

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a crime against cinema by any means
Neither the total disaster the UK critics claimed nor the misunderstood masterpiece its few fanboys insist, Revolver is at the very least an admirable attempt by Guy Ritchie to add a little substance to his conman capers. But then, nothing is more despised than an ambitious film that bites off more than it can chew, especially one using the gangster/con-artist movie...
Published on 7 Jun 2007 by Trevor Willsmer


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a crime against cinema by any means, 7 Jun 2007
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
Neither the total disaster the UK critics claimed nor the misunderstood masterpiece its few fanboys insist, Revolver is at the very least an admirable attempt by Guy Ritchie to add a little substance to his conman capers. But then, nothing is more despised than an ambitious film that bites off more than it can chew, especially one using the gangster/con-artist movie framework. As might be expected from Luc Besson's name on the credits as producer, there's a definite element of 'Cinema de look' about it: set in a kind of realistic fantasy world where America and Britain overlap, it looks great, has a couple of superbly edited and conceived action sequences and oozes style, all of which mark it up as a disposable entertainment. But Ritchie clearly wants to do more than simply rehash his own movies for a fast buck, and he's spent a lot of time thinking and reading about life, the universe and everything. If anything its problem is that he's trying to throw in too many influences (a bit of Machiavelli, a dash of Godard, a lot of the Principles of Chess), motifs and techniques, littering the screen with quotes: the film was originally intended to end with three minutes of epigrams over photos of corpses of mob victims, and at times it feels as if he never read a fortune cookie he didn't want to turn into a movie. Rather than a commercial for Kabbalism, it's really more a mixture of the overlapping principles of commerce, chess and confidence trickery that for the most part pulls off the difficult trick of making the theosophy accessible while hiding the film's central (somewhat metaphysical) con.

The last third is where most of the problems can be found as Jason Statham takes on the enemy (literally) within with lots of ambitious but not always entirely successful crosscutting within the frame to contrast people's exterior bravado with their inner fear and anger, but it's got a lot going for it all the same. Not worth starting a new religion over, but I'm surprised it didn't get a US distributor. Maybe they found Ray Liotta's intentionally fake tan just too damn scary?

The extras include a good interview with Ritchie and the editor, a standard love-in making of, music video and numerous deleted scenes. Unfortunately a cast and credits list is not included, which considering the absence of any credits on the film is a serious oversight. It's also worth noting that Revolver's DVD is of the British cut of the film rather than the re-edited version.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Revolver: Something a bit different from Guy Ritchie. Just not in a good way., 16 Sep 2013
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
I like a good action flick. And I enjoy Avant Garde existentialist cinema. When a director well known for his cheery mockney gangster flicks tries his hand at something a bit more Ingmar Bergman the result is either going to be the discovery of a hitherto uinknown artistic genius or a complete mess. In this film Guy Ritchie demonstrates ad nauseum that he is not a hitherto undiscovered artistic genius.

It's not that I am unwilling to watch something different to what I had expected. I have sat through many films that challenged my preconceptions and many of them I have enjoyed thoroughly. It's just that it is a very bad piece of film making. Every directorial decision is pretty much a duffer, right down to the decision to put Jason Statham into a comedy wig for the entire film. The usual Ritchie plot elements, various shades of villain double crossing each other in a hunt for a central treasure, in this case a big stash of drugs, are present and correct, but overlaid with a confused metaphysical mess that detracts from the film. The underlying heist/con story is poorly done, recycling too many plot elements from Ritchie's previous films and very sloppily directed. He has obviously watched Kill Bill and decided to shoe horn in a bit of animation, which is pointless and disjoints the film even further.

The whole thing is a confused mess of two hours, which left me with a lot of questions. With other films such as Seventh Seal I would happily rewatch them to try and get some answer, but nothing would induce me to rewatch this turkey. 1 star.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I'm totaly confused!, 18 Jan 2013
By 
Miss C. G. Lees (Croydon) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
Such a weird film. I didn't really follow the story very well and it was VERY confusing. Not even sure really what was going on... I guess it's worth watching the once, but I wouldn't recomend this film to anyone.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Revolver will leave your head spinning, 15 April 2006
By 
Stan Petrov 19 (EDINBURGH, Midlothian United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
I will really need to watch this again to try and make a bit more sense out of it.

I admire the fact that Guy Ritchie has tried something different and left the "Cor Blimey Guv" characters out of it. A little pretentious in parts and the scene with Statham in the lift is plain awful.

Performance wise, Statham is Ok, Andre 3000 is good but Liotta is awful. An orange casino boss called Dorothy, those Heineken adverts musnt be paying enough.

In short watch it and make up your own mind.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And the dog's bollocks in aspect to follow please., 18 Dec 2013
By 
Richard "Not here." (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
Well, as usual for me I come to this movie well behind the herd since I only just saw it. Viewed this far down the line, frankly all the fuss that's been made about it strikes me as a bit daft.

Apart from the fact that it ditches a conventional narrative it seems to contain all the elements typifying a standard Guy Ritchie flick: memorable larger-than-life characters, bravura action sequences, an ornate narrative puzzle which rocks along and gradually resolves itself --in short the highly artificial concoction that cons/co-ops the viewer into buying into an entertaining cinematic ride as if it bore some actual semblance to reality. It's the same approach he's patented so successfully since Lock Stock. So what's to bitch about? This film is no more artificial than any other in the Director's admirable canon --and for my money every bit as entertaining. This thing's chock full of great screen ideas delivered with the bravura we associate with this classy cinematic stylist. And yet it's got right up so many peoples noses as if it is somehow a creative mis-step which rips-off the fans.

Well, bull. This thing may be unanticipated but it's no aberration. A very interesting and highly entertaining sidestep, more-like. And it's sound.

To bitch about it because it isn't a standard genre gangster film strikes me as dumb. That completely fails to recognise it for what it is: a very original hybrid between the art film and the gangster genre movie. If Ritchie wants to make a personal art film which reflects his passion for cinema why shouldn't he? And why shouldn't we judge the result on it's own terms rather than rejecting it for not meeting the fandom's genre expectations?

If this was a piece by any other serious arthouse director interested in forging avant-guard cinema it would have been greeted as a remarkably original achievement. Show me another film in the history of cinema of similar character. When did you last see an art film that engaged with form as subject on this level; delivered with an expressive brio of the high aesthetic polish and striking visual power that is uniquely achievable on a big budget commercial movie? By comparison Tarantino's postmodernism pussyfoots around. The gangster genre tropes that are the basic material being cut-up in Revolver are treated far more radically and with a technical finesse to boot that strikes me as impeccable.

As for being pretentious, I can't see that. If it wasn't for the fact that Ritchie is supposed to have street credentials and the common touch of a 'Commercial' director with major box-office pull, I don't believe he would have been slammed for this. The charge of ego-centric self-indulgence doesn't wash on evidence of the film itself. The underlying concept is very carefully and clearly realised in a disciplined manner. The fact that the viewer is left to gradually realise that there is no conventional 'story' as such and that instead we are engaged in a film-makers's game strikes me as a very decent idea. The contract between Maker and Consumer engaged in every time we visit the cinema is here creatively addressed in an extraordinary, fresh way.

As for the opacity or otherwise of this, I assume that repeated viewing will produce dividends and reveal a wonderfully crafted construct. A fun one too. Tough on first-night critics maybe but who cares? And besides, it's not actually that tough if you've watched a lot of films. I'm no professional critic and I've only seen Revolver once. This film surprised and engaged me but I didn't feel bamboozled by it though. On the contrary, I enjoyed the confusing ride right from the off. I found it slowly dawns that the repetitive quotations about game-playing and the nature of the self-con at the heart of that are key to engaging with the overtly sign-posted synthetic reality on screen. Then this is confirmed by the way in which the relationships of each of the principal characters begin re-arrange like moving pieces and eventually merge in a resolution by the end. It's a sound construct.

As for the notion that the ultimate self-con of living an egocentric life of ME ME ME equates with a self-destructive dance with the devil for these gangster/trickster characters, well that's a thesis no more pretentious than the one at the heart Bergman's chess-playing knight surely? It actually doesn't matter if you personally buy it: the main thing is how well it is realised in the context of this particular piece of art. Looked at on those terms I can't fault Ritchie's artistic performance here. And anyway, he isn't claiming profundity in this film any more than he ever has. On the DVD extras of every film I've seen by him (including this one) they stress what a ball he and his team find film-making to be. He has always been clear about wanting to make entertaining films. Revolver, I found, is another one of those.

When Ritchie's extraordinary lifestyle as a highly visible celebrity-culture figure is also factored-in, this choice to place the themes of ego, game-playing and unreality (or do I mean false-reality), at the centre of a film seems artistically appropriate and an entirely legitimate bit of self-expression. If his personal experience leads him to buying the conceptual themes of Revolver as profoundly important, so be it. Should he be charged with egocentric self-referencing? No more than any other creative artist. Incorporating personal philosophical positions in his film is not indulgence. On the contrary, fair play to him for having the balls and artistic integrity to exploit his success in such a creatively daring manner.

I think this is a memorable film which is destined for highly credible cult-status. Anyone yet to see it should not be put-off by all the fuss surrounding the inaccessibility of a baffling plot. It's packed with superb performances (particularly Ray Loitta's), strikingly stylish imagery, exciting action sequences, amusing situations, and memorable characters. it's also tricked-out with an imaginative bag of formal magic executed with a virtuosity and film-making flair that's pretty rare. It's all very easy to enjoy if approached with an open mind.

Of course this stuff is entirely subjective, but personally my tip for fun with this one would simply be to ditch expectations, relax and go with it. It may look like a standard gangster film, but you're unlikely to find another one quite like it in a hurry.
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5.0 out of 5 stars esoteric spiritual teaching of the film, 30 July 2014
By 
R.Potter (Kent England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
It was released and then re-cut and the second cut is inferior to the first cut . Themes of pride and vanity. Jason Statham removes the Sub-Personalities of the ego.
Jake Green, Avi (the intelect) and Zach (the intuition/gut) are sub personalities of the Soul, untouchable by the Mr Gold Black Magician. The con is the game of the ego in the mind. The business is the ego and beliefs.
Deepak Chopra says that, "the Ego is the Enemy" He says that, "We invented the Devil so as to blame something external, whereas the Internal Ego is the Enemy"
Near the end, Avi turns to Jake Green and says “You are still in prison Jake. In fact, you never left.” The prison of the Soul by the Ego. The theme of the film is that control
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolver, Conmen, mindgames and bullets...and the film about the ego..., 21 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
This film is educational for those who have gained a good idea about the Ego as it will ad a deeper understanding of it.
For those who don't it will be a intriguing mixture between an action film and a Con-mind-game with loads of funny inputs.Guy Richie has certainly done another Masterpiece:-)
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece, 14 Dec 2011
This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
This movie is the only movie I know of which tackles the Ego situation found in every human being with precision. Actually it gives you an insight or even a battle plan for how to put the real balanced conscious you in driving seat again.
If you can't identify with the movie then it is possible you are in prison of egoistic mind and unaware that you are being coned by it...the same way Mr.Green was.
You should know that all characters are actually in Mr. Green's head. They are part of his persona.
Hint: Chess and Cons = Con chess...consciousness.

This movie is truly a masterpiece. Allegory well done. Actually it uses Zen Buddhism, Kaballah and Christian principles and teachings to WAKE YOU UP. 'Wake up Mr. Green'
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5.0 out of 5 stars or you'll love it or be bored because you don't get it, 25 July 2014
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This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
brief synopsis:Gambler Jake Green enters into a game with potentially deadly consequences. This is packed with head games and a blend of intellectual cunning and snobbery. Either you'll figure it out or you won't, or you'll love it or be bored because you don't get it. I loved it, my nephew hated it. The fact that Jason Statham is in it doesn't hurt either!

it was delivered quickly.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Obscure nonsense, 13 Sep 2012
This review is from: Revolver [DVD] (DVD)
Multi-layered? Thought provoking? No doubt both of these, but along the way there is not much fun, and a creeping sense that all you are watching is an exercise in self-conscious profundity by Guy Ritchie. He is a great director, but he overreaches himself badly here: make a clever film by all means, but not one that is too tricksy to entertain.
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Revolver [DVD]
Revolver [DVD] by Guy Ritchie (DVD - 2006)
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