Customer Reviews


51 Reviews
5 star:
 (38)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bridgets Back!
Well they've done it again. The second bridget jones is just as incredible as the first. Full of again the same dillemas and dramas that are typical of miss jones. The second film seems to show a more mature and wise side to bridget than the first indicating that she may be learning from her mistakes but this is Bridget Jones so probably not! It seems to be again that no...
Published on 2 Mar 2005 by Amazon Customer

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dull Bridget!
Very disappointed in the cover. It is plain brown (no photos) with the titles printed across it. Not the one shown. I can't see the one I have been sent on the site at all. I am hoping the DVDs will be of good quality. I ordered the £6.49 one. Might have been nice to have been asked if I had wanted something different from what I ordered!
Published on 5 Jan 2012 by katycat


‹ Previous | 14 5 6 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Feel good movie!, 17 Aug 2010
By 
N. Hall-Gardiner (England, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
It's just such a feel good movie, isn't it? I just love to play it when there's not much to do and you just fancy a nice quiet snugglie evening on your sofa wrapped in a warm blankie with a cup of hot chocolate or a glass of wine! I can recommend the films, the drink is your choice :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 29 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Gift for mum - she loved it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars utter genius, 29 July 2009
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
For years my sister and my friends kept trying to persuade me to watch this film, it took me a couple of years but one day i just sat down and watched it, now i don't particulary like rom coms, i find them to mushy with too little comedy, but this ticked all the boxes. I was laughing out loud throughout the first film, Renee Zellweger played the part extremly well and if i must say colin firth made a very attractive Mr Darcy.
The sequel, although plainly not as good as the original is not bad in the slightest, there is still the hunour which made the first as good as it was and of course there is still the original, fabulous cast which made the first movie great. Both of these films are hillarious and they had the perfect balance of comedy and romance, it is definately worth 5 stars and a future sequel!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Nov 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The best chick flick!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 5 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
very happy thank you
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bridget Jones-need I say more?, 4 Jun 2009
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
Fantastic. Funny, romantic, cringe-worthy at times, makes us all want a Mark Darcy, and is set in London! Renee Zellweger is actually pretty good in this, Colin Firth is charming as ever and Hugh Grant plays the sleazy guy so well. I reccomend the double disc set- amazing movies, buy it, watch it- no regrets! Arrived promptly, within 2 days.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bridget Jones, 26 Aug 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
Arrived on time, good value, no issues. Packaging very pretty etc etc etc etc etc etc is that 20 words yet?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 28 July 2014
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
excellent
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent box set, 7 Jun 2009
By 
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
i'm very happy with the dvd. did not expect it to come in such good condition and in it own box set. well impressed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Everyone Knows That Diaries Are Just, Full Of Cruhaarp!", 24 Aug 2007
By 
G. Bowden "genejezkova" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] (DVD)
Now, it is true to say that the iconography of Helen Fielding's Bridget Jones isn't one to be taken too seriously. Beginning life as a newspaper serial whose captions would later constitute a worldwide bestselling novel, Fielding at once captured the humility, the optimism and every single wine stain of the modern day middle-class working girl in England, with barbed asides regarding celebrity culture and the dating game that bordered on the scabrous but that were also never less-than-funny. To turn the novel into a charming romantic comedy blockbuster proved to be a bit of a no-brainer for Working Title and Miramax, and thanks to a marketing push that enveloped the world much like Miss Jones's underpants did her tummy and waist, pubs became wine bars or cocktail lounges and the film made over $270 million worldwide. Even if its success is responsible for one of the most weirdly inept sequels in recent memory and it made it okay for every twentysomething professional to drink their body weight in cheap wine every other night, there was a time when Bridget Jones was the film of choice for every night in and it remains a lovely diversion in spite of the fallout since its success.

Even if it uses the required plot machinations, quirky supporting characters, obvious soundtrack cues and innumerable other cliches that have turned the romantic comedy into the pastiche that it is hastily becoming, Diary has plenty going for it to differentiate itself from both its progenitors and its (non)successors. Firsty, it is held into place by a troika of well-judged performances from its leads, who are each clearly having a ball. Renee Zellweger's accent doesn't acquit itself as well as her awkwardly amusing physicality in the role of an English woman uncomfortable in her own skin but neverltheless remains nothing less than utterly enjoyable with her little-girl-lost expression permanently plastered on her face.

Hugh Grant hurls as much of his prior "befuddled fop" persona out of the figurative window as he possibly can with a devilishly delicious role as Jones's cuckholding sleaze-of-a-squeeze and gets to savour most of the film's best lines as a result. However, Colin Firth registers with the film's most demanding performance, seeing as the character both in the film and the book references his past work as Mr Darcy in the BBC mini-series of Pride & Prejudice so frequently. That he manages to achieve this and still create a convincingly swoonsome romantic foil for Zellweger is testament to his subtle skills as an actor. When both of these suitors share the screen together, it provides many a juicy moment for the audience to enjoy, particularly the spectacularly non-threatening, Eton boy-style fisticuffs bout near the film's end.

Moreover, the flurry of supporting characters that populate Bridget's universe aren't as overtly quirky as latter efforts from the Richard Curtis stable of romantic comedy, even if the talented likes of Jim Broadbent, Gemma Jones, Sally Phillips, Felicity Montagu and Shirley Henderson are given unfathomably little to do. Curtis's penchant for highlighting pertinent yet otherwise uncomfortably evoked issues of third world hunger are kept to the required minimum for a romantic comedy about drunken, lovelorn idiots from middle-class London (i.e. none) and director Sharon Maguire, whilst not the most visually appealing of helmers, does well to make sure that the mise en scene and the overall package is professionally adequate throughout. It's quite clear she's a dab hand with actors, and with the help of a confident script, she oversees that Diary doesn't get too mired in its cynical contrivances to still deliver a peachy treat for the romantic at heart.

Unfortunately, any good idea that achieves gold at the box office deserves a sequel according to the production house, and thus Bridget Jones's Diary was to receive a companion piece called Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason. Now, Fielding had written a sequel to her novel herself, albeit one not as well-received as her previous one and something remarkably different from what the film becomes. In contrast to Diary, Reason is a sequel governed by no form of rational thinking at all. Essentially a repeat of the first film with the situations, characters and even key plot points blown up to such ludicrous proportions as to align itself better with a Looney Tunes cartoon than its predecessor, Reason sports as much charm as can be afforded to a misguided, cynical attempt at blockbusterdom, despite its stars still emerging with some dignity intact.

Barbed with five credited screenwriters compared to Diary's three, the most notable casualty to Reason is the fact that Bridget Jones's character has all of a sudden turned into a rather unattractive caricature of herself from the first film. Zellweger can be credited for some of the film's laugh-out-loud moments thanks to her proven mettle as a physical comedienne (the slalom episode down the Alps in particular is a highlight), but the writing and director Beeban Kidron push her performance into such overblown vapidity it's hard for the audience to accept that this is the same intelligent, put-upon young girl from the first film. It's bad enough that the sequel has to re-hash moments from the first film with nearly half the hilarity (the fight, the bum-to-camera embarrassment, Hugh Grant's reappearance), but to have the character blunder through them as if the first film never happened is borderline insulting. The most questionable episodes involve a placation of wronged Asian girls with self-help books and chocolate bars and the second least convincing screen lesbian in recent memory (see Sonia in Eastenders for the first place winner).

Thankfully, even when Hugh Grant is slumming it he's still effortlessly charming, even if the way in which his character is brought back into the action is one of the most shockingly lazy workings in the script. Firth is again saddled with the straight man role against Grant and Zellweger, though this time he isn't given nearly as many charmingly left-of-centre moments as his declaration of attraction to Bridget or his final line from the first film; here he's alternately staid or lovesick. Fans of the supporting players from the first film are also to be dismayed at the lack of material here also, which is off-putting considering how little they had last time. You have to ask yourself what kind of film would give as reliable a comedic actor as Jim Broadbent or Jessica Stevenson (who should have won the role of Bridget hands down if anyone who's seen her TV show Spaced would know!) less than a handful of lines!?

As a result, Reason wasn't as big a hit as its behemoth budget demanded it to be, especially in the US where it made roughly half of the modestly-budgeted Diary, but what remains is a prize example of how not to follow up a successfully charming movie with a built in sequel from its original source. As presented in this three disc special edition, each film receives substantial extra material on their respective discs that were previously available separately, but nothing insightful or entertaining can be found on Diary's extras. However, Reason's supplemental material fares much better, including an especially filmed scene of Bridget interviewing Colin Firth as himself (declared by many as a highlight from the second book but rather obviously excised from the film) and an amazingly unapologetic commentary from director Kidron. The third disc includes more deleted scenes (nowt special) and a couple more featurettes, one of which questions Bridget Jones's iconic status in popular culture, before backing down from anything interesting or thought provoking and delivering a twenty-minute dirge of how great the films are. A wasted opportunity to build upon an otherwise lovely little film that became a phenomenon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 14 5 6 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD]
Bridget Jones's Diary / The Edge of Reason [DVD] by Renee Zellweger (DVD - 2005)
£9.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews