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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
When i first heard this album i wasnt too excited, but once i gave it a chance its one of my favourites.
540,000 = 4/5
Transgression = 5/5
Spinal compression = 5/5
Contagion = 4/5
Empty vision = 3/5
Echo of my scream = 4/5
Supernova 5/5
New promise = 5/5
I will follow = 5/5
Millenium = 5/5
Moment of impact 5/5...
Published on 24 Aug. 2005

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stay away
Transgression just appeared one day. I'd been a Fear Factory fan for at least five years at the time it was released and wasn't even aware it was in production. I'd enjoyed their return on 2004's Archetype (which itself hasn't aged well) but was taken totally by surprise when I glimpsed this then-latest LP sitting on the shelf in HMV. It had no promotion, save for a trio...
Published on 26 July 2011 by Paul McNamee


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 24 Aug. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
When i first heard this album i wasnt too excited, but once i gave it a chance its one of my favourites.
540,000 = 4/5
Transgression = 5/5
Spinal compression = 5/5
Contagion = 4/5
Empty vision = 3/5
Echo of my scream = 4/5
Supernova 5/5
New promise = 5/5
I will follow = 5/5
Millenium = 5/5
Moment of impact 5/5
Empire 5/5
This album is still really heavy, tracks like Transgression, Spinal compression, contagion, moment of impact, and empire are still quite heavy, the rest are more melow. This album has so much variety.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars mellow way forward, 22 Aug. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
Bve been a fan of fear factory since the soul of a new machine days, so getting this new album as soon as it came out was top of my to do list. After listening to it at first, i wasnt that impressed, it lacked the kind of instint kick in the teeth impact that ive come to know from these guys, but instead of instantly writing them off i have listened to the album on repeat and it has grown on me quite abit now. Burtons singing vocals sound the best they ever have, but when he roars, u dont get the feeling that hes even trying, which was not the case on the last album when he sounded like he could peel ur face off! The whole album is just set alot mellower than any other album, so if ur wanting heavy, stick with demanifacture or obsolete, but if u want something mellower try this. This is by no means a bad album, u can tell the group were going for something different, it just takes abit of getting used to.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stay away, 26 July 2011
By 
Paul McNamee (North Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
Transgression just appeared one day. I'd been a Fear Factory fan for at least five years at the time it was released and wasn't even aware it was in production. I'd enjoyed their return on 2004's Archetype (which itself hasn't aged well) but was taken totally by surprise when I glimpsed this then-latest LP sitting on the shelf in HMV. It had no promotion, save for a trio of videos shot on handheld camera in night-vision. Looking back, it's easy enough to see why, and easy enough to justify, too. From its opening whoosh `til its closing crash, Transgression is an atypically poor effort from one of the 1990s' most exciting metal masters.

Its three best tracks are each bundled with a caveat: one features a section that calls to mind, depending on your age, either "Everybody Wants To Rule The World" by Tears for Fears or the theme tune from Fireman Sam; another sounds like a cover; and the last IS a cover. "New Promise" is ruined by that unfortunate similarity to those aforementioned tracks, and "Supernova" would work really well as the homage to U2 it so clearly is if it didn't come two or three tracks before an actual U2 cover (and something I never wanted to hear was Raymond Herrera drumming a U2 song).
Sadly, the best Transgression has to offer is its second cover, a suitably pummelling take on Killing Joke's "Millenium". On either side of these songs sit bland, uncharacteristically atonal blunders. It's overly aggressive as often as it's overly introspective, and not often worth listening to at all.

What Transgression sounds like, to me, is the work of a band whose well of inspiration has run dry. Gone are the thrilling exploits of robotic tormentors, the laments on harvested identity or any of the sonic backdrops against which such lyrical treats were so uniquely set. Now, we're subjected to the simpering pledge of "New Promise" or the account of a man falling to death that is "Moment Of Impact". Forgive my churlishness, but it all feels a bit... Dream Theater?

More crucially, it doesn't feel like Fear Factory. There are many reasons, and one of the most striking is the way the record sounds. For some reason, considerable effort has been applied to making Ray's drums sound natural, acoustic, human. God knows why: his pioneering machinistic style worked so well because it DIDN'T sound human. Instead, his bass drum resonates into a muddled mess and his snare rivals St. Anger's for its annoying, persistent and all-encompassing tone.

The main problem, I suspect, is that Christian Olde Wolbers simply isn't a good songwriter. He just about got away with it on Archetype, riding the comeback wave and the hype its decent single helped create, but the playing on Transgression is so uninspired, a pale imitation of his predecessor Dino Cazares at best and downright amateur at worst.

Burton C. Bell doesn't escape unscathed, either. His performance marks a career-low, from his agonizing barks on the title track to his cracking voice on the intro to, you guessed it, "New Promise". That he has nothing worth singing about is clearly reflected in his performance if you ask me.

General criticisms aside there's a smattering of minor faults dotted about the place: keyboard parts that either feel out of place or start a fraction of a second too early; timings that don't quite gel, and even a section on "Spinal Compression" where you just can't tell what's being played at all.

I saw Fear Factory on the tour for this record and it was honestly one of the worst shows I've ever been to. I'm not levelling a cheap shot at them here, merely acknowledging the obvious fact that their hearts weren't in it. Following its release they vanished into obscurity for a few years and before you knew it they'd split into rival factions, with Christian and Ray forming the regrettable Arkaea and Burton re-teaming with Cazares under the Fear Factory name, the latter outfit releasing the mostly-worthy Mechanize in 2010. Mechanize is a solid effort and it's clear at least that Cazares' absence was certainly responsible for that pair of misfires in the mid-naughties.

There's no polite way to put it: Trangression is a stinker, and an album I'd recommend even the curious avoid.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Evolution Of The Machine, 15 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
Fear Factory have never been afraid to experiment with their sound, over the years they've evolved from the death metal approach of "Soul of a New Machine" to the incredibly polished "Digimortal" which melded the usual brutality with a number of huge sing (shout) along choruses, and even a gues appearance from b-real of cypress hill fame. since that album a line up change has seen Fear Factory return to their more familiar less polished sound, and this trend continues on Transgression.
Kicking off with the brilliant (but terribly named!) 540,000 degrees farenheit the band have retained the fury of the last album, but have upped the ante with all members challenging themselves to push they're musical talents further than they have ever gone.
There are several transgressions (cough) from the usual fear factory songs, for example the near 7 minute epic "echoes of my Scream" featuring Billy Gould of Faith No More fame on bass, as well as a song co-written by members of Lamb of God.
Also in the mix are two incredible cover versions, "Millenium" by Killing Joke and an incredibly faithful version of "I Will Follow" by U2. Fear Factory have been known to throw in covers to there albums, and these two do nothing to harm their reputation.
Overall a really great album, forwarding the band, though at the same time remaining familiar to long term fans. Highly Reccomended. 9/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fear Factory Transgression, 5 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
This album slays. Fear Factory have matured a lot. This record definately shows this, songs such as "Supernova" and a cover of u2's "I will follow" Show how diverse the band can be. Its not all down tuned guitars and Double peddle, The Album is extremely heavy in parts. Tracks such as "540,000 degrees Farenheit and "Moment of Impact" are both insane!! Fear factorys futuristic sound is not as full on as on digimortal and archetype but The Lyrics are extremely meaningful and they really stand out. Some very powerful messages in them. Overall this album is wicked and is a must have for any Fear Factory fan!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Elder statesmen of metal do it again, 13 Sept. 2005
By 
L. Kelly (Newcastle, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
Fear Factory seem to have been stars of the metal scene forever. There 1992 debut - Soul of a New Machine - was a crushing exercise in death metal, but lurking just beneath the surface was an electronic aspect paying homage to the early industrial bands.
Over the years this original sound has evolved, and helped to coin the term 'Cyber Metal', the perfect description for Fear Factory's brutal, futuristic metal.
Their 1995 masterpiece 'Demanufacture' is considered by many to be one of the greatest metal albums of all time, and all but impossible an act to follow. Yet time and time again this band have managed to defy the critics and nay-sayers and produce album after album of stomping metal classics, even having time to put their own unique spin on Gary Numan's 'Cars' and Nirvana's 'School' along the way.
And so 10 years later, and their latest album is released. Sounding not a million miles away from Demanufacture, this is nevertheless the sound of a band that have matured over the last decade.
The machine-like drumming of Raymond Herrera is still in place, like-wise the staccato riffing that is the signature of the Fear Factory guitar sound. Vocalist Burton C Bell has lost none of the power that made him the 'dry lung vocal martyr' of old and can still evoke goosebumps with his guttural roar.
However this album displays a sense of melody that was only hinted at previously. The synths are prevalent on many of the tracks on offer and combine with Bell's clean vocals to great effect, creating an almost gothic atmosphere.
For a band that has thrived on it's reputation for agression, this is a bold move that could so easily have backfired (Fear Factory covering U2's 'I Will Follow'?) Thankfully the gambit pays off, and this is an album of truly epic proportions that can only serve to solidify their position as true icons of metal.
Not only a must-own album for any fan of metal or electronica, this album should be given a chance by any discerning fan of alternative music.
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5.0 out of 5 stars this could be the start of something beautiful!!, 5 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
Strangley a quote from the last album seems so fitting..."The infection has been removed, The soul of this machine has improved"...the second album on since the reforming minus original guitarist Dino and they seem to be sounding a lot healthier. There seems to be more progression in the sound. The fact that the samples seem to be more organic and intermingled with the music, instead of over powering. It also sounds like Burton seems unafraid to use different vocal stylings, as 'Contagion' and 'Empty Vision' will both show. Definately standout tracks from first listen. 'Moment of Impact' is also a great sign of how things have changed. With drums sounding more like they should do. As you'd expect with the departure of a guitarist and the introduction of a new one, the guitars sound different. But they also seem to fit the music a whole lot better. My only complaint is the U2 cover, but that is down to me not liking U2...as a whole, this is a sign of the good things to come from the Fear Factory camp. Another album like this and they will be back to where they where after the release of Demanufacture. As a long time lover of Fear Factory I would recommend this to those with an open mind. Fans and first time listeners alike!!
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2.0 out of 5 stars Nothing to Fear but Fear Itself, 24 Oct. 2005
By 
Donny "invisible" (England, South-West) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
Not a bad album...but not a good one either. After the Digimortal album I was pleased to see FF go for a more stripped down, less heavily produced sound with a slight change in lyrical style.

But here they are on the second album since then and still the same old tired lyrical 'Future world, machine dominated clichés' that they are used to...except less exciting.

The potential however is still there and as usual the musical proficiency is fantastic. Apart from a few quieter moments that don't really add allot it's still an ok FF album.

As a final word think about this...when the best tracks on your album are covers by U2 and Killing Joke (great songs and good covers) should you not be worried as a so called pioneering metal band? Get any SYL album instead, they are all better than this.

The DVD is great for Fans but there isnt an awful lot on there and certainly nothing insightful.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A change of tone, again, 2 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
I have to admit, I only got into Fear Factory a short while ago, but all it took was for me to pick up a copy of Hatefiles and I was . I was astounded by the strength of the music, and couldn't turn their music off. Transgression shows a real change in character for Fear Factory. In fact, every album that they record shows a different side of their unique sound.
In this album, gone are the death grunts of before, and we welcome a new more melodic sound, that Burton C. Bell masters this perfectly. Echos of My Scream is a gorgeous track, really showing off Burtons talent in a different light.
Herrera however, has also taken a different direction. Less used are his trademark "machine gun" drumming, and again, his amazing drumming fits in more with the new melodic sound of the album.
Overall I absolutly love this new creation from Fear Factory, but don't expect the sound to stick around. Their next album will doubtlessly sound different.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of their best records to date!, 5 Sept. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Transgression [CD + DVD] (Audio CD)
I've had this album for a few days now and I can't get enough of it! They band have gone for a slightly new direction with this record, but are definately no worse off for it.
With this release Fear Factory have followed up the outstanding Archetype perfectly, this is an evolution for the band rather than a revolution. Standout tracks for me right now are Moment of Impact and Transgression, typically Fear Factory but with a new edge. Every time I listen I find a new favourite though, so who knows which songs I'll love by the time I see them live! They're even better there than on cd, and touring the UK in January, I can't effing wait!
The band have said this album is about transgressing their fears and making the record they really want to make, and it shows.
This is absolutely essential for Fear Factory fans, and for those who have only heard a few tracks by the band, I urge you to check this cd out.
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