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56 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, bitter sweet piece of cinema...
I hadn't seen this for a long time, but after seeing it mentioned somewhere, I thought I'd order a copy and give it a go. I'm glad I did.

When the wind blows follows a retired couple as they deal with the threat of nuclear war. Both of them lived through the last war, and had been guided through that faithfully by the government and other authorities. They...
Published on 25 Jan 2010 by C. Gordon

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars moving characters
Many a year since last seen. Still a moving dvd to watch. Still a experience to be had
From the people portraid
Published 6 months ago by John Harrison


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56 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, bitter sweet piece of cinema..., 25 Jan 2010
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This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
I hadn't seen this for a long time, but after seeing it mentioned somewhere, I thought I'd order a copy and give it a go. I'm glad I did.

When the wind blows follows a retired couple as they deal with the threat of nuclear war. Both of them lived through the last war, and had been guided through that faithfully by the government and other authorities. They follow the government advice on preparation for a nuclear attack, and build a shelter in their home and make preparations according to leaflets such as 'Protect and Survive' and a county council issued pamphlet. It is here that the humour in the film is very much in evidence, as Jim and Hilda's naivety keeps them in the mindset that 'everything will be fine if we follow the correct procedures'. Small things made me smile- when Jim said they needed to stay in their shelter for 14 days and should stock up with essential provisions, Hilda tells him that she'll 'order 28 pints of milk'.

When the warning comes that missiles are only three minutes away, Hilda says she'd better getter get the washing in, still not realising just how different from the last war this one will be. Jim's reaction comes as a shock, but certainly portrays the urgency of the situation.

In the aftermath of the bomb, Jim and Hilda are hopelessly naive about the situation that they find themselves in, and your earlier laughter turns to sadness as you feel the inevitability of the situation. They still expect the milkman and paperboy to come after a day or two, and that 'the insurance will sort out the mess, dear'. So too, do they expect that the local shop will be open- they won't let something like a war shut them down.

Jim and Hilda are a lovely, likeable old couple, and it cuts you up to watch them struggle against the odds, caught up in a situation that wasn't of their own doing- they've tried to do everything right and put their trust in the authorities (believing everything they are told), but it is soon evident that having survived the nuclear blast itself, being a survivor in the aftermath of the bomb is not necessarily a good thing.

A word about the animation here too- it is a clever mix of a model set mixed with the drawings and it gives a very very good feel to whole film. The small pieces of live action footage here and there only add to the piece too.

Overall, a beautiful thought-provoking film that will start you off laughing, and may well end up with you shedding a few tears before the credits go up.
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73 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally blown away., 2 Oct 2005
By 
Tox "Tox" (Leeds UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
I first saw this in 1987. No one watching that film that day walked out of that theatre with a dry eye. It is the story of Jim and Hilda, a nice old couple who could be your parents or grandparents. They live out in the country having retired and their life harks back to the glory days in the "last war" and when the government knew best. While the rest of the world is inching towards nuclear conflict, Jim begins planning for the attack in the only way he knows how, he reads the government documents and acts on what they say. When the bomb falls, they are the unlucky ones and survive the initial onslaught; the following days are harrowing for them and immeasurably sad for those of us left watching. The end, when it comes for them is so incredibly moving that it cannot fail to leave you thinking of your own family and what future we as a species might have on this planet.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heartbreaking and terrifying, 6 Jun 2014
This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
I have never before watched a film where I have been so emotionally invested in the characters involved - at several points I cried like a child because of what was happening and the bigger picture of events that you knew was taking place.

This is a superb film which highlights both the ignorance, still as prevalent today as it was all those decades ago, that surrounds nuclear conflict and the confusing and often contradictory advice given by Government and local authorities.

The true fact of the matter is that Britain (and lets be fair, every other country in the world) has never been adequately prepared to cope with a nuclear attack (an impossible feat when the nature of such an attack is complete and utter destruction) and much of the guidance given back with Protect & Survive and other such manuals was to create the belief that there was a system in place which would survive first contact.

Nuclear war is terrifying, still a feasible risk today, and this film captures so many aspects of it perfectly on a small and intimate scale.

Get it, sit down with time to spare, free of all distractions and watch.
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68 of 75 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When the wind blows, 6 Oct 2005
By 
Tony Stansmore (Southampton, Hampshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
WHEN THE WIND BLOWS
by Raymond Briggs
This recently re-released animated classic from Raymond Briggs (The snowman, Fungus the Bogeyman) is a dark comedy exploring the theme of nuclear holocaust. Originally a book in 1982 and then a film in 1986, the re-issued DVD hit the shelves on Monday (or in my case, became available on Amazon). Yes, it focuses on the nuclear bomb, but it is not in the bomb itself or in the threat of war where the film's brilliance lies. It is in the absurdity of the governmental instructions. Taken from genuine home office leaflets from the time, the homeowners guide is a piece of genius and a worthy fore runner to Mr Blair's recent terrorist information pack.
As the threat of nuclear destruction closes in around them, and when most people would be praying or desperately phoning loved one, happily retired Jim Bloggs is frantically carrying out government guidelines such as painting the windows white ("to keep out radiation") and creating an inner core or refuge (doors propped up against the wall with cushions on). All of this is of course sound advice from the government on how to protect yourself against a nuclear bomb. Poor old Mr and Mrs Bloggs follow it to the letter. Jim rushes to the local shop and although they have run out of protractors (to ensure the doors are propped up at an angle of 60 degrees) he does return with 2 packs of ginger creams, half a sponge cake, some pineapple chunks and a Christmas pudding. All of which are essential in case of a nuclear holocaust.
The film is loosely split into 2 sections. Preparations before the bomb drops and life after the bomb has dropped. Jim regularly forgets who the enemy is, as the word "war" only seems to conjure up memories of Hitler and bombs falling on London. Continuously correcting himself from saying Jerry, to saying Ruski, the musings as to what sort of people "Ruski's" are is dry and entertaining. "but I saw some Russians dancing on the Tele once" notes Mrs Bloggs "They seemed very nice." And as the thought of Russian soldiers entering their house dawns upon Jim, (He imagines a huge man armed to the teeth and pointed his Tommy gun straight at them) the best strategy available to them is put forward by Mrs Bloggs... "Maybe I could offer him a cup of tea!?"
For all its humour though, this is not a film to be taken lightly. The utter hopelessness of the situation combined with Jim's unwavering belief and trust in his government can't help but bring a lump to the throat and a tear to the eye of the most unemotional among us. Scenes showing the couple in happier times (their wedding day, walking in the park) only serve to increase the viewers anger at how these good, simple people can have their lives wiped out by the arrogance and lust for power displayed by the world's leaders.
I urge you all, by whatever means possible, to get a copy and share it amongst everyone you know. Then sit down and read Tony Blair's terrorist information pack. So funny I nearly cried.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars We are under attack....., 2 Jun 2010
By 
Ian Smith "SmigMan" (Liverpool UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: When The Wind Blows (Audio CD)
This was watched by a 13 yr old in 1984 (ME) 25 years on I watched it again and still in awre at the lives of poor old Jim and Hilda - you actually be a part of their lives and understand literally what they are trying to do in following the governments advice to the letter...getting their food ration in and building a shelter inside their house. As the film goes on you live the lives of Jim and Hilda, right up until the end, when there is no hope left at all and they slowly drift off due to raidiation sickness........

The deep music of the film ends up staying with you. Roger Waters gravely voice is haughting to say the least but the songs ring true now as back then.

Throughly recommend this film 100%
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars what might have been, 15 Jun 2009
By 
Mr. A. Gorton "tony gorton" (western australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
a billiantly done cartoon which makes you question the idea that the state knows best,the main charecters are like your favourite grandparents who compare the current day problems as in the 80s with ww2 and react accordingly.
at first it is too easy to laugh at the pair and the naive way they react to the situation,but the overall sadness soon prevails but you cannot help but admire their spirit the final moments of the film with the paper sacks must be one of the saddest on any cartoon type film.
however this is not a tom and jerry type cartoon but what might have been
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars God almighty, Ducks! There's only three minutes to go!, 23 Jan 2011
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

When the Wind Blows (1986) is an animated film directed by Jimmy T. Murakami and based on the graphic novel of the same name written by Raymond Briggs. It features the serene voices of John Mills and Peggy Ashcroft who voice Jim and Hilda Bloggs, a retired old couple living in the Sussex countryside. When the threat of Nuclear War starts to loom ominously, the stoic couple build a shelter in their home and set about storing provisions suggested by the government pamphlets. But do they, or anyone else, really understand the fall out of a nuclear strike?.

There was a time in the 1980s when Nuclear War was a distinct possibility, paranoia was rife and adult folk actually started to contemplate the end of humanity. Film makers were quick to tap into the topic and produce movies to further stir those paranoid juices. America produced the dated but very impacting The Day After in 1983, with the film causing Ronald Reagan to reevaluate his Country's nuclear arms policy, while in 1984 the UK gave the cinema world the bleakly shattering Threads. A year prior to The Day After shaking the boots of those watching it, Raymond Briggs, author of the delightful The Snowman, was moving into more adult territory with his work. Propelled by a sense of loss for his parents, whom the Bloggs' are based on (they had featured in his Gentleman Jim 1980), he was inspired to write When the Wind Blows after watching a BBC television programme about nuclear contingency. Thus the film version was to arrive in 1986. Naturally in animated form, so as to simultaneously entice and awaken the kids of the day to Nuclear War possibility and the effects of such.

When mooching around for some back story on Briggs and how he came to write it, I came upon a review for the film that chastised the characters for being stupid! Well it's more stoic naivety than stupidity say I, and it's that that drives When the Wind Blows forward. The stupidity comes with the government instructions in how to cope with such a nuclear attack. That these two amiable old pensioners, survivors of the last World War no less, can't grasp the seriousness of the situation is not stupidity, leaflets handed out gave hope that one could survive such an event. As they, as charming an old couple you could wish to meet by the way, go about their business out in the quaint countryside, they show a tender bond that can't be broken, not even by what they think is just the latest War. It's very much a we shall overcome attitude that gains emotional weight as the fall-out starts to take hold and our adorable couple become ill. Come the finale, all the acerbic touches and the underlying message at the film's core, hits home hard, yet Murakami still manages to keep it tender enough, ultimately doing justice to Briggs' excellent literary work.

As potent now as it was back in the 80s. Lest we forget that the threat of War, nuclear or otherwise, is never far away from us all. 9/10
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece, 4 July 2007
This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
A masterpiece of animation in filmaking. I remember seeing this not long after it came out in the mid 80's (I was about 13-14 years old). I found it brilliant then, and it has stood the test of time well. A very powerful movie that has everything. Outstanding visuals, dark comedy, pathos, sadness and fantastic voice acting. Everyone should watch this film, a lesson to remember how close we came during the cold war era, and that the threat is still very real today. Some of the events in the film really struck a chord with me: I remember seeing houses with whitewashed windows back then for instance.
I cannot recommend this highly enough - see it.
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39 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Musically perfect, and lyrically depressing., 24 Jun 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: When The Wind Blows (Audio CD)
After hearing about this music accompanying reviews of When the Wind Blows as a movie, I was interested, due to my love of nuclear war movies.
Thanks to contacts in Australia, I received a copy of the soundtrack, record form. I must say, I wasn't disappointed.
Hearing this immediately made me fall in love with the talents of David Bowie, Squeeze, and especially, Roger Waters. Each song on this soundtrack is unique, with it's own expression on the situation of Jim and Hilda Bloggs, as well as the rest of the world.
Bowie's title track is grungy rock, which is emotionally powered and amazing, which shows he put his all into the song. The uplifting instrumental by Paul Hardcastle doesn't exactly fit in with the feeling of the rest of the track, but is an enjoyable listen.
Squeeze's "What Have They Done" is an ear-pleasing piece which became one of my top-10 favorites. Genesis does an instrumental as well, which is full of percussion, and also is odd in that it doesn't really fit either, but don't let that stop you from enjoying it. Hugh Cornwell's Facts and Figures is probably the only really uplifting song you'll hear on the soundtrack, with sensible lyrics and outstanding piano.
This is just the first side. When you flip to the second, Roger Waters takes over. This is the essential side, the one that made me fall in love with Waters and Pink Floyd in general.
The lyrics are brilliant. There are many dramatic instrumentals, with foreshadowing military drums during the Russian Missile, the American Bomber, and the British Submarine.
While Waters doesn't have too much of a voice, he gets his message across with the beautiful sound of Claire Torry in "Towers of Faith," my all-time favorite song as of now. The saxophone and guitar blew me away.
After the tense instrument when the bomb hits, it gets more grim, with an emotionally wrenching piece called Hilda's Hair, a prelude to the old couple's sad death by radiation. Which leads to Folded Flags, the final track. Waters does very well here, and it brings the whole soundtrack together to a close, making you feel depressed, but with the knowledge that it all ended with a major note and the fading away of a high-guitar string being plucked.
I guarantee you'll find a favorite in this compilation of great songs, which is the collectors' essential record to have when it comes to obscure songs by superb artists. In a nutshell, it's a brilliant, emotion-filled ride through a story told by intelligent and talented artists.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD), 25 Nov 2014
This review is from: When The Wind Blows [DVD] (DVD)
Why are people still so naive in this world? Believe only what you see and hear on mainstream news. Mutually Assured Destruction is on the way, maybe not the way depicted in this excellent movie, but on the way it is. We are being dictated too at every level, movies, games and books just to name a few. If someone is strong enough to speak out about what really is going on, i.e. behind the governments, royalty and world leaders etc, then be assured they will have a very short life. We have been indoctrinated since birth too believe and think one way, through money, religion, language and the education system all for the benefit of the controllers. We are just their puppets. So let’s get off our arses Mr and Mrs whoever the hell you are before it’s too late and break free from these psychos.
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When The Wind Blows [DVD]
When The Wind Blows [DVD] by Jimmy T. Murakami (DVD - 2005)
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