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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic
First shown in 1985, Revelation of the Daleks was the final story of season 22. By this stage it already been announced that the following series would not be made, with the programme being cancelled just weeks before the first story of the next season was due to commence filming. It was only thanks to the public outcry and several newspaper campaigns with their save...
Published on 25 Jun 2005 by D. Evans

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still some signs of life..
SPOILER ALERT

The Doctor and Peri arrive on Necros, a funerary planet, where the dead are held in suspended animation. He is there to pay respects to a friend but the whole thing is a trap. The planet has been infiltrated by Davros who is secretly using the bodies as spare parts to build a new army of Daleks and selling the remains to other planets as a form of...
Published on 14 May 2012 by Ian Sharp


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The way it should have been...., 18 April 2008
By 
andy "andy" (Cornwall, England UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
I am not going to go into great analytical depth with this story, since a good many other reviewers have done this here already.
Suffice it to say that not only is this probably one of Colin Baker's best story, if not the best one; it is also one of the best Doctor Who stories of the 80's, with a real creeping sense of horror at the things Davros is up to, some brilliant dialogue, and some very black humour.
It is my opinion that this one story equals the classic Hinchcliffe era of Tom Baker stories in its tone.
By that i mean its level of violence, humour and feeling.
Those stories, (Pyramids of Mars, Seeds of Doom, Deadly Assassin etc) are revered as classics, and this one should be too.
Only a few things jar, and that is the Alexsei Sayle DJ character which is a bit over the top, and significant in that producer would repeat this mistake in future series of casting tv celebs in unlikely roles that would jar terribly. (There are a lot of 7th Doctor tales that can be included here.)
The only other thing that is a shame, is that of the ending, where Colin Bakers last line linking into what was supposed to be a real cracker of the opener of the next season, was deliberately missed off.
This is because the series was temporarily shelved due to a lack of support from BBC bosses and pandering to silly people who called it too violent, and would next year go into a decline from which it would never recover,(until 1996,and then 2005 with the new series) with the start of the 'new direction' which would increase the humour content at the expense of realism, thanks to pandering to the Mary Whitehouses of this world, something that thankfully does not affect the new series, where the balance is pretty good.
The Trial of a Timelord that would follow, would see the episode count effectively slashed to half, and with the introduction of more dodgy casting to follow....
Colin Bakers last line?
Well, he was originally supposed to say,
"Alright, I'll take you to Blackpool."
The reason?
This was to be where the Doctor was to have a return match with the Celestial Toymaker, a foe first encountered by William Hartnells Doctor in the story of the same name.
This was to be followed by another story with the return of the Ice warriors for the first time since 1974, and then it was rumoured, a story set in either Hong Kong, or san Francisco, with the return of the Autons....
Instead, we got the Trial Of a Timelord.....

Doctor Who should be scary, violent, and black humoured occasionally, and this story depicts that perfectly, with Colin baker doing a star turn.
Enjoy this, and think about what could have come after in the same vein when you hear the last line that never was!
This story, could, and should, have been the start of a new classic, dark scary era for Doctor Who, with Colin Bakers Doctor seeing a longer tenure.
Alas, it was not to be, but this story stands tall in its own right as a good one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A revelation (of sorts), 11 May 2009
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
I have to disagree with 'A customer' who says that this story is usually poorly-regarded by fans of Doctor Who. Au contraire; this is probably the most highly-rated Dalek story after 'Genesis of the Daleks'; Baker had settled into the role and is a much more interesting and more palatable character, whilst Davros is on top form and the guest cast are superb.
DVD extras on this release also rate highly; from the illuminating 'Making of' (sans Colin Baker), to the option to see the serial with updated special effects, and a behind the scenes look at some of the action scenes.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Colin Baker and dalek high point, 11 Aug 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
Having watched this recently released DVD, I remember clearly why it was I enjoyed this story so much as a young boy when it was first broadcast in 1985. The plot deals with dramatic subject matter and is entirely consistent with the previous story, Resurrection of the Daleks from 1984 (another classic). The sets and special effects are also much more effective than many of the stories during this period. The Doctor and Peri are both very convincing in the story and much of the tedious humour from the season is thankfully absent. It is certainly a story which should be watched by all dalek fans.
The main criticism I have of the story is not regarding Trevor Cooper or Alexei Sayle (although such characters are a bit cringeworthy) but the excessive violence and unpleasant subject matter that occurs throughout. Embryonic daleks and hands being shot off are fine (although we have to remember that this was being broadcast at 5.30pm on a Saturday during a season that people had come to expect lighthearted stories like The Two Doctors) but torture scenes, knife and syringe stabbings and general character humiliations still makes this story an uncomfortable watch. I would certainly not recommend it to anyone under 10 years of age.
That said, the extras are great and I hope the BBC continue to release such high quality discs!
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "You are a fool Orcini, you cannot kill me! I am Davros!", 14 July 2005
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
"Revelation" is not really a Dalek story, it's a Davros story with some Daleks thrown in and a cameo by The Doctor. Many would site this as the stories main weak point, after all The Doctor is completely superfluous to the plot, and his presence makes absolutely no difference to the events that have been set in motion or their resolution. As for the Daleks they are reduced to mere foot-soldiers, lurking in the shadows and occasionally threatening people in rather high-pitched tones. The Doctor and Peri don't even come in contact with any of the central characters until the second episode! It is indeed a peculiar narrative, but it works. Maybe The Doctor should have had more to do with the outcome, but his smaller role in events allows Davros to take centre stage and the supporting characters to flourish. The Daleks too work well in this respect, kept mainly in the background and seen only occasionally gliding through the misty corridors of Tranquil Repose, they retain a sense of menace and are nicely underused until the finale. Graeme Harper manages to bring the whole thing to life beautifully, he has a keen sense of what works dramatically, and visually this is one of the most polished and impressive stories the series ever produced. Saward, an often unfairly maligned writer has delivered probably his finest script here, a multi-layered story dealing with predominately adult themes, littered with memorable lines, strong supporting characters, drug references and excessive violence. Strong stuff for it's pre-watershed timeslot. I'd like to add that I for one like the DJ, He quickly becomes likeable, as we see him converse with Peri & kick some Dalek b*tt! and is perhaps the heart and soul of the whole story, so it's a real shame that he's exterminated so quickly.
But this is a Davros story after all, and I have rarely been so enthralled with an actor's performance. Terry Molloy is utterly superb, in what is truly his superlative appearance as Davros.
Some don't care for Molloy's take on the mutated Kaled scientist, and prefer the power-house performance that Michael Wisher so memorably gave us in "Genesis", they tend to feel that by the 1980's Davros had become nothing more than a lunatic, and lacked the subtle nuances of Wisher's definitive portrayal. This is of course a matter of opinion. I love both actor's take on the role, but Molloy's performance is marvellously restrained in "Revelation", the actor obviously aware of the need to make Davros resemble a real person rather than your archetypal two-dimensional villain and Davros has never been more cold and calculating than he is here, always one step ahead of every other character in the story, he outsmarts all of them, and the only mistake he made was in not anticipating the arrival of the renegade Daleks. I particularly enjoy the scene in which "The Great Healer" attempts to control his temper in front of Kara, and be diplomatic but cannot conceal his true totalitarian qualities, ordering her instead of asking , his softened tone of voice frequently returning to "rant mode" as he attempts to keep up the charade. It is an impressive insight in to his true character, flawlessly played by Molloy. Once again the creator has become more interesting than his creations. He also appears to have harnessed the powers of the Dark Side of The Force, as he now has the exact same ability to shoot blue lightening from his fingertips as Emperor Palpatine did in "Return Of The Jedi" and "Revenge of The Sith" respectively and can also hover about the place! What a bad-ass! But I digress, Revelation is a true classic, definitely the finest story of the Colin Baker era and an excellent choice for release this year. I don't need to see the features to know that this is an essential purchase for fans old and new. I can't wait to see Graeme Harper back in the directing chair for the news series! As judging on the strength of this and the classic "Caves of Androzani" we're in for a real treat!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very unusual Dr Who story, but wonderful nonetheless, 18 Jun 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
Revelation is really not that good a story, offering a bizarre narrative in which the Doctor and Peri spend the first 45 minutes largely on their own. However, and it's a big however, director Graeme Harper transforms it into a great work of art, thanks to his fantastic eye for detail and instict for dramatic imagery. Everything about this story is stylistically and dramatically over-played, from the acting to the music and set design. It shouldn't work, but it does. The daleks barely feature, but when they do, they look magnificent gliding along the smoke-filled catacombs. Terry Molloy really makes the part of their wizened creator his own - the sight of Davros' severed head, swivelling hawk-like from side-to-side in his glass cylinder, spitting out curses and cackling hysterically is not easily forgotten. The music score and many of the directorial tricks come out of the same bag that Caves of Androzani used, but the twist here is the maudlin streak of black comedy missing from the earlier story. S**, swearing, drug abuse, homosexuality, nose-picking, necrophilia, double-entendres, expilicit violence, death - this story has it all (and should have been broadcast well after tea-time). This is a spectacular production filled with memorable moments.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not only the best Colin Baker Story... but the best of the '80's, 30 Aug 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
This story isn't seen too favourably in a lot of people's eyes, simply because not a lot of people are fans of Colin Baker's era, so therefore this story is judged harshly by fans. Admittedly, his era on the show isn't the best but that is not the actor's fault, the reason is simply Dr Who's popularity was falling and not a lot of people could write for sci-fi.But anyway the story itself is brilliant and for the life of me I couldn't find any major faults. The story has a real funeral morbid tone to it and slick dialogue and black humour is tremendous fun to watch. The decision not to feature the Doctor and Peri as much in this story as much was a brave one and worked brilliantly as it allowed other stories from different charecters to take charge allowing for a more diverse and innovative story to take hold. The charecter of Davros is played perfectly by Terry Malloy. Whilst, he doesn't reach the heights of Michael Wisher from 'Genesis of the Daleks' he nonetheless adds a different perspective to Davros which not only complements the charecter we've met from previous stories but enhances him. In this story we also see the continuation of the Dalek Civil War which will come to an explosive conclusion in 'Remembrance of the Daleks' (another story I highly reccommend). I won't give away too much else of the plot for fear of 'Spoilers' so i'll move straight onto the extras. The commentary is as entertaining as ever and the new CGI effects help to enhance the story, however the real gem of this dvd is the documentary 'Revelation Exhumed'. It's as revealing as ever whilst also adding to the colourful story of '80's Dr Who. So, overall this is an instant classic that's placed highly in my top 10, it's directed fantastically by the ever-brilliant Graeme Harper, written to perfection by Eric Saward (it's his finest script, no doubt because at this point he was close friends with the magnificent Robert Holmes) and is just to put it simply a masterpiece of television.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 1980s Doctor Who at its most off-the-wall, 6 Jan 2007
By 
M. Wilberforce "mwilberforce" (Bristol, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
Story: 4/5 - Extras: 4/5

"Revelation of the Daleks", by script editor of the era Eric Saward, is one of the most inventive and generally peculiar outings that the original series of "Doctor Who" ever produced. "Revelation" is not ostensibly "experimental", but instead uses more straightforward storytelling techniques to create something that is, through a combination of its setting and its strange characters, very off-the-wall.

Tranquil Repose is a funeral home where the recently deceased are kept cryogenically frozen awaiting the cures for their various diseases, with their suspended consciousnesses kept entertained by a DJ (Alexei Sayle) who models his act on American rock DJs of the late 20th Century. But bodysnatchers have arrived, one of whom is in search of her father, and find that the tomb they came for has already been emptied.

On the surface, it's business as usual for Tranquil Repose, under the watchful eye of the repulsive chief embalmer Jobel (Clive Swift) and his fawning student Tasambeker (Jenny Tomasin). The Great Healer (Terry Molloy, reprising his role as Davros, creator of the Daleks) is doing unspeakable things with the bodies of the perpetually interred, lurking in the catacombs deep beneath Tranquil Repose. Meanwhile, the Doctor arrives to visit the tomb of an old friend, and almost gets crushed by a statue of his own likeness in the Garden of Fond Memories (possibly one of "Doctor Who"'s most eccentric cliff-hangers, and a device bearing very little relation to the actual plot).

"Revelation of the Daleks" is an intriguing story with a great collection of grotesque characters. The Doctor and Peri actually don't have a great deal of involvement in the plot, serving primarily to fall into Davros' trap, and although they do subsequently play their part in ruining his plans, much of the initiative is taken by the supporting characters. The real strength of the story is the exchanges of dialogue between the various characters, which are full of black humour. The story is also a visual treat, with inventive sets and some very atmospheric location filming (complete with unintentional snow). "Revelation" is often hailed as Colin Baker's best televised story, and while I wouldn't necessarily agree with that assessment, it certainly does boast great performances from all concerned and several inventive twists.

On the DVD is a commentary with Nicola Bryant (Peri), Terry Molloy, Eric Saward and director Graeme Harper, and an interesting 45-minute documentary on the making of the story, both of which are let down only by the absence of Colin Baker, who was unavailable to contribute. There are also optional improved CGI effects and the usual informative on-screen production subtitles, plus a few other bits and bobs. Another good package.
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4.0 out of 5 stars You Could Call it a BURIED Treasure!, 30 Aug 2008
By 
D. Wright "GrumpyGeezer" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
In a word: superb. A pacy, dark thriller filled with black humour that is more than the sum of its parts. Okay, the special effects are pretty ropey, the Doctor & Peri are given too little screen time and there are some of the campest deaths by Dalek ever committed to video. Yet this odd, eccentric tale is easily the best story in the Sixth Doctor's brief tenure in the TARDIS. Director Graeme Harper is one of the few people to work for both the new series and the old. If you watch this story you can see why. Terry Molloy delivers a great performance as Davros; he depicts the bald baddie as a scheming genius lurking in a web of intrigue on the planet of Necros.Clive Swift also deserves credit for a great performance as the vain, nasty, sleazy Jobel and his demise is a classic Who moment not to be missed. Bizarrely this adventure is loosely based on "The Loved One" by Evelyn Waugh but really is an affectionate tribute to the great Robert Holmes, the script-editor and scriptwriter of many Who classics.Writer Eric Saward held Holmes in great esteem and "Revelation" has a distinctly Holmesian flavour: a sharp focus on the horror elements of the plot; black humour with exceptionally witty dialogue and a double act among the supporting cast. The most gaping flaw of the adventure is the tangential relationship between the Doctor and the main thrust of the plot. In part, I would suggest, it is due to the seemingly prickly relationship between Saward and Baker: Eric wasn't particulary enamoured of Colin's larger than life portrayal of the Timelord. Nevertheless, a great story.

The Commentary is fun and informative with Nilcola Bryant (Peri) admitting that several of her legion of male fans like her running , jiggling escape from an explosion as she almost experiences a "wardrobe malfunction." The documentary is great and shows Harper's determination to complete a difficult shoot despite the sudden cold snap that meant his shooting schedule on location was so disrupted it had to be rewritten ad hoc.

This may not be on a par with classics like "Genesis ..." "Caves of..." but a cracking adventure for fans of "classic" or "new Who".
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best dalek story of the 80's, 24 Sep 2007
By 
Dalek Matt (Durham, england) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
This story was first broadcasted in 1985, and followed the trend set by the pervious year's 'Resserection of the daleks'. With lots of darkness and comedy, this is one of the best dalek stories I've seen.
Plot: The 6th Doctor, and his companion Peri arravie on the Planet Necros at Tranquil Repose, where the Galaxy's rich and famouse who have been nearly killed by disease are held in suspended animation untill a cure can be found for what killed them. They've come to pay respect to an old friend of the doctor. However, things aren't all they seem to be. For deep below gound in the catacombes, Davros, posing as the Great Healer, is turning half the sleeping population of Tranquil Repose into an army of daleks, and the other half into food to sell to a staving Galaxy...
This is a brillant story, and is a huge lead forward from 'Resserection'. The daleks are back at their best, and Coiln Baker's acting is also good. The comedy is really good, and the D.J. is brilliant. The only drawback is that some of the acting isn't very good.

Apart from that, it is brillant, and I would recomend it to any Doctor Who fan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Dalek serial ever!, 14 Mar 2009
By 
Ben Cross "BigBCROSS" (Liverpool) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Revelation of the Daleks [1985] [DVD] (DVD)
Having only got into Doctor Who only last year I bought this story months ago to see what the Daleks were like having already seen both Resurrection and Remembrance of the Daleks I was intrigued about this story.

After watching the DVD I have to admit I was absolutely entertained from start to finish. Everything about it was perfect in my opinion from the storyline, the acting especially Colin Baker who encapsulates the role of the Doctor perfectly in my opinion. Since I bought this DVD I have seen every single one of Colin Baker's stories apart from The Twin Dilemma and whilst I would admit he is no Tom Baker or even David Tennant, he doesn't get the credit that he deserved for his portrayal.

The extras on the disc are rather interesting too. There is a minor problem with the disc and that it randomly skips chapters but this can be resolved by turning of the CGI effects.

Overall a fine Doctor Who Serial and in my opinion Colin Baker's best story.
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