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5.0 out of 5 stars OK, what's so bad about this thing, then?
SPOILER WARNING

"Zontar: The Thing from Venus" is a remake of "It Conquered the World". I know that "Zontar" is an extreme low-budget production with turkey status, but I admit I somehow liked this story! With the exception of the embarrassing monster and its "injectors", of course. They give a new meaning to the expression "bats in the belfry". Otherwise, I...
Published 11 months ago by Ashtar Command

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3.0 out of 5 stars Zontar: Thing from Venus / The Eye Creatures
Zontar
"It must come from the very hart of man himself."

Dr. Curt Taylor (John Agar) refused to believe there is life, malevolent or benevolent, out there. Mean while brilliant and misunderstood scientist Keith Ritchie (Anthony Houston) invite his Venus buddy Zoltar over to earth to make a few social adjustments.

The philosophical discussions...
Published on 15 Feb 2011 by bernie


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5.0 out of 5 stars OK, what's so bad about this thing, then?, 22 Sep 2013
This review is from: Zontar: Thing From Venus/The Eye Creatures (Region 1) (NTSC) [DVD] [US Import] (DVD)
SPOILER WARNING

"Zontar: The Thing from Venus" is a remake of "It Conquered the World". I know that "Zontar" is an extreme low-budget production with turkey status, but I admit I somehow liked this story! With the exception of the embarrassing monster and its "injectors", of course. They give a new meaning to the expression "bats in the belfry". Otherwise, I think director Larry Buchanan solved the budget problems relatively well, by making the film look like a theatre play.

The plot revolves around a mad scientist, one Tom Anderson, who is a kind of misunderstood genius. Anderson manages to contact an alien intelligence through a radio device in his own house. Of course, nobody believes him. Then, funny things start to happen: communications satellites disappear, cars and trains stop going, martial law is declared...

It turns out that Anderson has struck a deal with one of the aliens, named Zontar. The alien, who has managed to reach Earth and lives in a cave, promises to solve all the world's problems. The catch: all of humanity must be "controlled" or brain-washed by the alien. By loosing all their emotions, humans will finally manage to overcome war, conflict and petty strife. The aliens are really a kind of parasites, forced to leave Venus when their former host creatures died. Humans will presumably be their new hosts, but in return, we'll get Paradise. That's very hard to believe, and it's pretty obvious that Zontar contacted Anderson in order to use his latent megalomania and misanthropy against the rest of the human race.

Unfortunately for Anderson, neither his wife nor his best friend wants to accept the Neuordnung. The new utopia quickly turns into a nightmare. Eventually, Anderson realizes his mistake as Zontar (who looks like a monster bat) kills the scientist's wife in a stand off. In the finale, a somewhat wiser Anderson takes on the alien with a sophisticated laser device, killing both Zontar and himself. The narrator then recites a new agey message about change being a thing that must come from within...

An interesting story! It could have been a great movie (or a theatre play) with somewhat better actors, a larger budget and a more convincing alien. I admit I resonated with the philosophical message, but I also felt a certain amount of sympathy for poor Mr. Anderson, even during his crazy phase. As a teenager, I actually wrote an (unpublished) short story on a similar theme - aliens "help" a humanity that can't improve itself - and I even considered writing a story about a bizarre political movement that wants to save the world by abolishing emotions... Old concepts within scyfy, it seems. I admit that I felt, in a somewhat megalomaniac manner, that "Zontar" was in some sense "my" story. So hey, cut the crap about this being a turkey, will ya!

Obviously, I have to give "Zontar: The Thing from Venus" five stars.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Zontar: Thing from Venus / The Eye Creatures, 15 Feb 2011
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Zontar: Thing From Venus/The Eye Creatures (Region 1) (NTSC) [DVD] [US Import] (DVD)
Zontar
"It must come from the very hart of man himself."

Dr. Curt Taylor (John Agar) refused to believe there is life, malevolent or benevolent, out there. Mean while brilliant and misunderstood scientist Keith Ritchie (Anthony Houston) invite his Venus buddy Zoltar over to earth to make a few social adjustments.

The philosophical discussions take precedence over the sci-fi action. And the wives (Patricia De Laney and Susan Bjurman) turn out to have a strong influence on the direction of the story.

This is a TV remake of Roger Corman's low budget "It Conquered the World"

The original film "It Conquered the World" with Peter Graves had the alien looking like a rubber creature with tentacles for tootsies. And instead of flying lobsters they used bat like creatures. This film even though a cheap remake seemed to spend more time on significant dialog, making it more relevant to our life.

After watching these two versions of the story, be sure to watch the spoof "Lobsterman from Mars" with Tony Curtis.

----------------------------------------------------
Eye
An excruciating remake of "Invasion of the Saucer Men" (1957)

If you've seen "Invasion of the Saucer Men" than you actually seen this movie with a few cheap twists and turns. If you have not seen "Invasion of the saucer men" I suggest you watch it instead of this film.

Stan Kenyon (John Ashley of "Beach Party" fame) and his girl Susan Rogers (Cynthia Hull) dispatch a hideous creature from outer space. Even though they were using a car this was before the invention of "texting". The insidious creatures removed the body replaced it with a more conventional body of evidence. Now will no one believe Stan or Susan?

There are two interesting things about this film. The first is that it was made in Dallas and some of the locations are actually recognizable. The second is the voyeurism of two airmen using an infrared detector to watch a couple petting in their vehicle.
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