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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My Terror Time In Hippy Hell - EXCLUSIVE ( nevertoolate #008 )
The first time I encountered Amon Duul II was sometime
in 1969 when their debut album 'Phallus Dei' was championed
by the late, great, Mr Peel on his inestimably great Saturday
afternoon radio programme.

The release of 'Yeti' a year later endeared them to a wider UK audience.

The amalgam of hard edged, guitar-led rock,
spirited...
Published on 4 May 2008 by The Wolf

versus
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great Album, poor remastering
This is one of my favourite albums, but unfortunately the remastering job doesn't do it justice in this case, the sound on the disc is rather flat and lifeless compared to the vinyl, hence the reason why vinyl copies are still changing hands for around the 30 mark. Get a vinyl copy if you can.
Published on 25 April 2009 by Martin Allan


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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My Terror Time In Hippy Hell - EXCLUSIVE ( nevertoolate #008 ), 4 May 2008
By 
The Wolf (uk) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
The first time I encountered Amon Duul II was sometime
in 1969 when their debut album 'Phallus Dei' was championed
by the late, great, Mr Peel on his inestimably great Saturday
afternoon radio programme.

The release of 'Yeti' a year later endeared them to a wider UK audience.

The amalgam of hard edged, guitar-led rock,
spirited eastern-tinged accoustic improvisation
and dark teutonic drug-induced mayhem has
an almost charming quality in retrospect (although I remember my peers
and I being terribly serious about it at the time !)

The almost free-form electric ramblings of 'Yeti', 'Yeti Talks To Yogi'
(just loving that title !) and the more gentle flute-tinged accoustic
trip 'Sandoz In The Rain' are worthy of attention.
Ms Knaup's wailing vocal on 'Archangels Thunderbird' and parodic (I hope) operatic
interlude on the 4-Part opening "suite"(?) 'Soap Shop Rock' are deliciously loopy.

Whenever it appears Mr Karrer's violin is also to be savoured, particularly in the almost beautiful 'She Came Through The Chimney'.

In a week which saw the passing, at the ripe old age of 102, of LSD
inventor Albert Hofmann it seems somehow fitting that Amon Duul should
be remembered affectionately as a part of that generation for whom, however erroneously,
"turning on" bore hope of a brighter and more enlightened future.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sandoz was famous for...?, 26 Oct 2002
By 
Junglies (Morrisville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Yeti (Audio CD)
Amon Duul were a German collective who split thus Amon Duul and Amon Duul II. Whereas the former were more politically involved and wanted to be closer to the people, II focussed on raising the people's awareness through the music. Inspired in part by the Grateful Dead, in part by Pink Floyd, Amon Duul were very much part of the nascent Krautrock scene in Germany.
Yeti, along with the first Ash Ra Tempel album, are representative of the psychedelic side of the German scene. Another reviewer appears somewhat critical of aspects of the album but given the situation at the time in Europe, it is not clear to non-Brits why this was such an innovative album.
For a start most German bands were guys. Amon Duul had non-descript female vocals but II had Renate. Influences here included Yoko Ono, Grace Slick, Janis Joplin and the Teutonic goddess Nico. The combination of the vocals, the guitar effects and the focus on improvisation marked this band out from almost every other aside from Can.
Yeti is the gem in the crown of their work. One of the earliest European albums to include recorded improvisational material, Yeti occupied one complete side of the album. At the time they were little known outside of Germany although there was a growing awareness by a small cognescenti in Britain due to the connections with members of the psychedic warlords, Hawkwind.
In a sense the track listings do not really matter as the album was intended to be a reflection of their live gigs but aside from the title track, two others standout. Archangels Thunderbird became a crowd favourite much to the disdain of the band reportedly at the time but was included in many gigs and appeared in Live in London. The last side of the vinyl album devoted to Yei, Yogi and Sandoz is a genuflection to the company who first created LSD and is played accordingly.
This is the last album which would capture the band in it's full improvisational glory. Thereafter there music became more complex much in line with other developments on the music scene at home.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars monster monster, 19 Mar 2012
This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
all time classic lsd inspired freakout. a sprawling twisted gothic nightmare. excellent. all held together by dave andersons superb bass playing. real heavy man....
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The beast cometh, 28 Aug 2006
By 
D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Yeti (Audio CD)
Amon Duul II's 1970 offering, 'Yeti', is one of those vast double-set excursions that now fits neatly on to CD. It's heavy on the electric guitar and at times it sounds as if Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi has lent them his downtuned axe, especially on the flammable 'Archangels Thunderbird'. The rhythms though are not as basic. This band was never conventional but they could be relentlessly exciting. Comparisons with Pink Floyd are slightly overstated. The title track sets out like the middle section of 'Interstellar Overdrive' and there are other fleeting resemblances but Syd and the boys had songs,a bit more craft and were three years ahead. Amon Duul were more overtly hard rock and their vocals on 'Yeti' are almost superfluous, consisting mostly of distant, tuneless shouting. Still, this is mesmerising stuff. The gypsy-style opening of 'Cerberus' offers some variation but by the power-drenched drive of 'Eye-Shaking King' you're happy for the album to carry on for infinity. Special mention must be made of the brief 'Pale Gallery' which is the best soundtrack Italian horror movies never had. Play it in the dark and hide.

If I have a problem with any track it's 'Soap Shop Rock', the second half of which is superb, but which seems stuck in the same gear for the first six minutes. I would also say I prefer 1971's 'Tanz Der Lemminge' which has a better balance between improvisation and craft and seems more focused. 'Yeti' at its best however possesses more adrenalin and is probably the most hallucinatory example of hard rock you'll hear.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars get the jap shmcd version, 4 Sep 2009
By 
G. Ellis "demontrucker" (england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
i dont know about this version but i just obtained the jap import shmcd version on belle antique and it's the full lenght version containing th full version of pale gallery only previously avalible on the captain trip release the inner sleeve credits are for the edited version but the playing side are as originaly intended
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oases of timelessness in gritty expanses of wasteland, 5 Feb 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Yeti (Audio CD)
The camel, it is said, eats thorns because it enjoys the taste of blood. It is equally easy to mistake the source of pleasure when listening again to music I first heard when I was as the same age my children now are. Adolescence is an intoxicating time, prone to improvisation and replete with a heightened sense of expectancy. Amon Duul II were one of the groups who continued these late 1960's musical themes into the 70's - but listening to "Yetti", in large part, serves as a powerful antidote to attacks of nostalgia. At least half of the original vinyl (Yeti, Yeti talks to Yogi, Sandoz in the Rain) can only be enjoyed by glimpsing lost sensations rather than re-discovering lost masterpieces.
But those masterpieces are there, and worth finding. Of them, "Cerberus" is perhaps the best, although the version on the retrospective "Best of" disguises this all too well. In fact, all of what was originally side two of the etched-black-plastic version remains amongst the best Amon Duul II produced, ie amongst the best music washed up in the wake of 1960's psychedelia experimentation. "Archangels Thunderbird" begins the superlative sequence, albeit a little leadenly, leading into the sharp-as-shards "Cerberus", and culminating in "Pale Gallery" (which, it is hoped, is reproduced in its full rather than 2:11 truncated version on CD).
One day, a university course entitled "Twentieth Century Music" will race through the "Dylan-Beatles era" lecture and the lecturer will address the nodding heads with "some groups took these ideas further" and cue "Cerberus". The class will wake up.
Until then, or at least until a truly "Best Of" is released, "Yetti" is worth it for its timeless visionary glimpses. If you were there you might not remember, if you weren't you might still find the music unforgettable.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yeah, nostalgia still works!, 12 Dec 2007
By 
This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
The whole psychedelic scene from, say, '67-'74, centred around this sort of sound. I was there (from what I can remember) so the Duul were almost a regular dose of our legal highs, usually accompanied by something not so legal . . .
I vaguely remember taking my state-of-the-art Philips cassette down through Morocco into the Sahara and blasting out 'Sandoz' and 'Yeti' to passing kif-inspired camels who came my way. Have you ever seen a camel smile? THEY ALL LOVED IT!
Maybe it was a world destined to collapse under mid-'70s political pressures, but if you weren't there, at least you can still let the Duul (along with the wonderfully-named Renate Knaupe-Krotenschwanz) take you some of the way. I can still trip to it - quite legally now, alas!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Early 70s Rock, 14 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
This was the stuff I used to groove to in the daze of my misspent youth. I'd forgotten how good Amon Düül II were. If you're humming or ha-ing about this - buy it! You won't regret it!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved It, 10 May 2013
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This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
Bought this for a mate at XMAS. At first he was a little cool about it, expecting it to be more similar to Can than what it is. After this brief interlude, my pal couldn't stop playing it for a week. Very guitar driven, and of its time, but also timeless. The remastering has enhanced the sound quality without sacrificing the vibe. Arrived quickly from the US. Recommended for anyone who wants to own some of the prime so called Krautrock albums of the early seventies. It's a scorcher!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Yeti Remastered, 11 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Yeti: Remastered (Audio CD)
It is hard to believe that this music still sounds so fresh and innovative after all these years one of the great albums that you should own. If you don't own it listen to it NOW!
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