Customer Reviews


22 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars His one, real protest album.
When Bob Dylan has a fire in his belly and is on top form, there are few things finer in this world. With two albums under his belt and a confidence that could only have come from rapturous applause, he embarked upon this most serious of collections.

Very few albums have what you'd call the perfect sleeve art, in the sense that it is a visual representation of...
Published on 26 April 2007 by street-legal

versus
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the times they are a changin
some tracks ok, some not, i like Dylans earlier albums , and bought this to complete the set, im sure it will grow on me.
Published 16 months ago by karl denver


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars His one, real protest album., 26 April 2007
By 
street-legal (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
When Bob Dylan has a fire in his belly and is on top form, there are few things finer in this world. With two albums under his belt and a confidence that could only have come from rapturous applause, he embarked upon this most serious of collections.

Very few albums have what you'd call the perfect sleeve art, in the sense that it is a visual representation of the music within. On The Times They Are A Changin' it is perfect. Stark, moody, monochrome, almost archaic even in 1963. Bob looks 23 going on 53, a man with the world on his shoulders.

From the off, Bob has some serious things to say. Let not over-familiarity dilute the title track, a revolutionary and almost Marxist desire to see the old order crumble and for the young to take over. Its actually startling that he got away with it! The subject matter is largely grim; he sings about murders on The Ballad Of Hollis Brown, Only A Pawn In Their Game, and The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll. There's one about the horrors of a closing mining town (North Country Blues) and another couple that directly relate to his anger against the establishment (With God On Our Side and When The Ship Comes In).

Its predecessor, Freewheelin', was liberally sprinkled with his Chaplinesque humour, and he wouldn't be railing against anything except women on its follow up, Another Side Of... again doused with that silent movie farce as was his wont. The Times They Are A Changin' is pretty hardcore stuff; one man, a guitar, both as harsh as the words he was putting across.

For me, a special place in my heart is reserved for With God On Our Side and The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll. These are stunning pieces of poetry set to music that's so gorgeous as to make you want to weep. I personally prefer Freewheelin' for its greater scope, but like that album, this is purely timeless.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Don't criticise what you can't understand', 18 Jun 2008
By 
D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
'The Times They Are A-Changin'' doesn't progress from what Bob Dylan did on 'Freewheelin''. Rather, it broadens his protest-oriented repertoire. Perhaps the gloomiest of his albums, it seems to be the only one from which his sense of humour is entirely absent. There is a slight shift in emphasis from anti-war songs to the effects of social injustice and hardship. Nevertheless, 'With God On Our Side' would have fitted in with the dominant theme on his previous album. The lyric, and in particular, its closing verse, is brilliantly crafted, though Dylan's delivery is occasionally disjointed by sloppy tempo changes, perhaps an attempt to break up its seven minutes.

The title track is probably the best-known item on the album, in large part due to the status it gained as a slogan, a kind of rallying call. It sets the tone for the whole album, characterised by Dylan's sober drawl and songs of relentless, unchanging form. The latter technique works well on the folky blues of 'Hollis Brown'. Dylan uses the guitar to add sombre colour to the song, which is a 'what-drives-a-man-to-kill' lyric of the sort featured liberally on Bruce Springsteen's early 1980s album, 'Nebraska'.

'North Country Blues' is probably the gloomiest recording, relating the anguish and hardships endured by redundant miners. Sandwiched between this and 'With God On Our Side', the reflective 'One Too Many Mornings' almost seems like light relief. 'Hattie Carroll' is another death song. It's one of Dylan's more articulate performances, though, ironically, I believe, there are doubts as to the authenticity of the slant Dylan puts on the story.

This album may not be perfect then, but it's still blindingly powerful and a remarkable forty-five minutes for 1964.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Times They Are A Changin': Bob Dylan - Dylan shows that he is no pawn in anyone's game, 25 July 2012
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
This 1964 release is the third studio album from icon of the age Bob Dylan. Building on the success of the previous year's `Freewheelin Bob Dylan' he continued to develop his own unique style, moving away from the pure folk of his debut and developing his political and surreal song writing styles. It's a dark album, full of death and bleak imagery, that culminates with the Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll, probably one of Dylan's most topical and angriest songs that deals with the murder of a black woman and the racist legal system that let her murderer off with a joke of a sentence. Other highlights are the titular song, in which hope is expressed that things are changing (but the rest of the album seems to be trying to prove that they aren't) and `One Too Many Mornings', a paean of hurt and loneliness that we can all relate to.

It's perhaps not as instantly accessible as Freewheelin, but it grows on you. The imagery Dylan conjures up is vivid and makes you think. It's one of the great protest albums, 4 stars. The
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cold Coyote Calls., 8 Dec 2010
By 
Duluoz Lautrec (Dewsbury, Yorkshire.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
They say you can't judge a book by its cover but 'The Times...' is exactly as the cover suggests, downbeat, mournful, melancholly, ragged and dirty. There's no 'I'm a poet/I know it/Hope I don't blow it" quips, there's no joking around on Bob's last 'protest' album, it's about death, desperation, sacrifice, hatred, Bob doesn't offer solutions, just states the facts.
It's just Bob with his harmonica and guitar and he fingerpicks beautifully on a couple of tracks, his vocals are mournful to suit the music and the lyrics are direct, there's no 'mystery tramps' or 'two wheeled gypsy queens' here, this is an album saturated with reality.
To my mind, the only throwaway song on the album is 'When The Ship Comes In' which sound like it's been included to up the tempo a touch and when you consider that 'Seven Curses' and 'Moonshiner'(available on 'Bootleg Series 1-3') were recorded in the same sessions, both downbeat and superior, you can see the reasoning but I'd have plumped for either of the rejected pair.
As far as the remastering goes, I don't hear any difference at all, the packaging is superior by a long chalk but a couple of the songs still sound like they're culled from vinyl or a dodgy mastertape, ironically this adds to the overall sound so it's no bad thing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ne of Dylan's most depressed and emotionally draining works, October 10, 2007, 9 Oct 2012
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
Dylan's third studio album, THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN' continues in the protest vein of its predecessor, FREEWHEELIN' BOB DYLAN, but with a much more narrow focus. With FREEWHEELIN', Dylan did record protest music, but there was much more to that record than just straight protest, and what protest there was operated on a much more universal level than the run-of-the-mill protest songs of the day.

Not so with this record. When Dylan recorded THE TIMES in 1964, he decided to focus solely on the protest music genre of the 1960s. While much of the music is memorable, because of the narrow constraints Dylan imposed upon himself, THE TIMES has become more dated than any other reason in Dylan's career. And because it is so protest heavy, the album gets monotonous and just depressing to listen to in large quantities (just like the New York version of BLOOD ON THE TRACKS). Listening to the album straight through is very emotionally draining Taken in small doses, though, it's doable.

In the early days of the rock industry, the focus was much more on singles and EPs than full length albums. Bands like The Beatles and Led Zeppelin and their contemporaries are largely credited from moving the musical industry of the early and mid 1960s move away from singles to albums as the dominant art form. They helped make the albums indivisible and consolidated, with a natural ebb and flow, instead of sounding like a collection of singles with filler thrown in between.

While Zeppelin and The Beatles are the most renowned for this movement toward albums in general, along with jazz musicians, Dylan beat both bands several years to the punch. All of Dylan's albums have a distinct atmosphere and sound that he is creating, even his critically panned albums.

With TIMES, he is going for a stark, world-gone-wrong feel that dominates the entire record. Because of its heavy content, TIMES stands as Dylan's most depressing and emotionally draining album by far. While his other acoustic records certainly have a world-weariness and a focus on protest sentiment, they are also very humour at times, and filled with a vibrancy and life that TIMES is simply lacking. Now, only the deep morose of a world gone wrong stands out.

TMES is also unique because it appears that Dylan enrolled in the Phil Ochs school of songwriting, pulling his material directly from newspaper articles. Songs like "Pawn in Their Game," "With God On Our Side," "Lonesome Death of Hattie Carol," and "North Country Blues" all sound very much like relics of their time. While I always personally enjoyed "Pawn in their Game" due to Dylan's intricate word play, the song had become dated. While "With God on Our Side" has a universal message, Dylan focuses a large portion of the song on the early 1960s Cold War conflict between Russia and the United States, thus making the song dated in ways the FREEWHEELIN' song "Masters of War" will never be.

The title cut, justly one of Dylan's most famous songs, sounds simply like a made to order protest song. In 1963, before the song was recorded, Dylan's friend Tony Glover saw the early manuscript of the song, and read the lines "come senators, congressmen, please heed the call". Glover reportedly asked Dylan: "What is this s---, man?" Dylan's answer: "Well, you know, it seems to be what the people like to hear". The song sounds like a rather self-conscious attempt at a grand statement, and the spiritual sequel or successor to "Blowin' In the Wind". "Things Have Changed," Dylan's Oscar winning song from the Wonderboys soundtrack of 2000 is in many ways an answer to this song. Even though the song sounds forced, Dylan was at the height of his powers during the 1960s, and the title cut is one of his strongest songs. Just goes to show that when an artist of Dylan's calibre writes made-to-order music, he can still come up with fantastic material. Just look at Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel.

"Lonesome Death of Hattie Caroll," much like DESIRE's "Hurricane", has Dylan protesting social injustice with a memorable melody, strong lyrics, but unfortunately not that historically accurate. The song is about a young Maryland man with high political and social connections randomly killing a woman who was working at a hotel he was at for a ball named Hattie Caroll by hitting her with his cane. While William Devereux "Billy" Zantzinger (Dylan mispells his name as "Zanzinger") did get charged for manslaughter, it is generally agreed she did not die due to physical abuse. Hattie Caroll had a medical condition of hypertension, harden arteries, high blood pressure, and an elarged heart, and though an autopsy was not performed, she probably died of a brain haemorrage caused by stress from the situation, rather than the physical assault itself. The cane left no marks on her. The song is a fan favorite, and Dylan has performed it in concert in recent years.

The rest of the songs are rather well done. Dylan recycles the melody of FREEWHEELIN's "Girl from the North Country Fair" for "Boots of Spanish Leather". Dylan, being Dylan, had stolen that melody from Martin Carthy's arrangement of the English folk song "Scarborough Fair" lifts the melody to D. Dylan wrote "When the Ship Comes In" when a hotel denied him lodging while he was with Joan Baez do to his scruffy, hobo look. "Ballad of Hollis Brown," which Dylan rerecorded in the 1990s, is a fantastic, morbid song originally auditioned for FREEWHEELIN' but sequenced as the second track to great effectiveness, a stark contrast to the rather anthemic qualities of the title cut "Times They Are".

Like his debut, BOB DYLAN, THE TIMES ultimately is a rather limited snapshot of where Dylan was at artistically at the time. Bruce Springsteen is famous for recording numerous songs during his sessions that don't make the final cut, because the material doesn't fall in line with the overall tone he is striving for. Just like Springsteen's records, Dylan limits himself strictly to a specific type of music, in this instance protest music, but at this point in his career he was writing much more than protest music. Had Dylan included some of TIMES' outtakes as supplemental songs or substituted the outtakes for songs that made the album, TIME's emotional and artistic core would be changed radically. Had songs like "Lay Down Your Weary Tune," "Percy's Song," "Bob Dylan's New Orlean's Rage," "Farewell," "Hero Blues," and "Eternal Circle" been included, the TIMES would be a much more versatile album instead of the straight protest record that it is.

In retrospect, TIMES remains an important album, as much for what it is not as for what it is. Dylan would never make another album so protest oriented. Dylan would famously move away from this direction, lyrically with his next album, and then musically as well on the his electric period. The song that always stands out to me is "One Too Many Mornings", with this very memorable lyric of "Everything I'm a sayin', you can say just as good, you're right for your side and I'm right from mine"). Dylan famously recast that song in his "Royal Albert Hall" concert. With this song, he is already hinting at his break from the folk scene, like his subconscious now he can't stay in the protest folk scene for long.

The last song, just like most last songs on Dylan albums, is very significant. "Restless Farewell" stands as Dylan's own farewell to the movement that catapulted him to fame, and just like "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" is a devastating kiss off to people trying to pin Dylan down to their definition of what they want him to be. The protest movement only got Dylan for full straight album.

Ultimately, for what it is, TIMES is a great album, but not really an accurate snapshot of Dylan's art at the time. TIMES feels like a diversion into hard-core protest music, and not really natural extension or progression of what Dylan was doing at the time. My own thoughts are he had to go through the folk-protest movement and then go on to rock'n'roll, to go through just one more persona and then cut it away.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars damn good, 18 Nov 2007
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
if you like freewheelin or any other dylan then youll like this. If your new to dylan then id go for a more famous album (highway 61, bring it home, freewheelin, desire, live 1966)

my favourites on this album are Ballad of Hollis Brown and North country blues - both songs are so powerful and haunting and sung with such precision, leaving me shell-shocked everytime
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The times they are a'changing, 27 Sep 2005
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
Possibly Dylans darkest work, this album is full of acoustic work that is is simply amazing. It is not a 'feel good' album, with dark songs such as 'Only a Pawn in Their Game', 'Ballad of Hollis Brown' and 'The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carrol', all the songs on this album tell stories. The songs that realy stand out are 'The Times They are A-Changin', 'Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather' and 'When the Ship Comes In'.
In short: Buy this album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars i love bob dylan, 29 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
this music brought me back to my teens when everything was possible and nothing was going to stop me achieving my dreams now I think the era was the best music ever
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Still a-changin, 19 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Times They Are A-Changin' (Audio CD)
Brilliant Bob at his best. No wonder they thought he was their spokesman. He wasn't, but was a shining light of protest in those few days.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars From a time when we thought the world would get better., 18 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Better in terms of quality of life for EVERYONE that is.

This is a good recording, I have had the LP since the 60s, but the ease of use of CD and FLAC has driven me to supplement several of my old LPs. For those who may feel that old Dylan does not benefit from digitalization, I can say that with my hi fi system now sounding better than anything I have previously had available, every nuance of the recording is manifest, Bob's voice is perfectly suited to his themes, and the production is clear as a bell.

Although i have seen Dylan live a few times, most recently at the Roundhouse in London a few years ago, I would have loved to see him in the "pre-electric" days, preferably in a small, smoky club. Most tracks here are just Dylan with guitar and harmonica. The closest approach to the original performances.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xaa294d08)

This product

The Times They Are A-Changin'
The Times They Are A-Changin' by Bob Dylan (Audio CD - 2005)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews