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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a happy ending
with dross like coldplay and james blunt dominating the charts,
this brilliant album has been ignored which is a shame.suede were an amazing band and when brett and bernard announced they had made up and were forming a new band i was ecstatic.their songwriting history carries such a lot of baggage that to try and top dog man star and their 1993 debut would be a tough...
Published on 2 Sep 2005

versus
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Anderson & Butler reunite...
There is a rumour stated in John Harris' excellent account of the fall and rise of Britpop 'The Last Party' that somewhere between the 4th and 5th Suede album Bernard Butler offered to write songs for Anderson & co. 'Here Come the Tears' feels very like that - produced by Butler, with the musicians Butler has played with since the 1990s, and with the symphonic-pop he's...
Published on 23 April 2006 by Jason Parkes


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a happy ending, 2 Sep 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
with dross like coldplay and james blunt dominating the charts,
this brilliant album has been ignored which is a shame.suede were an amazing band and when brett and bernard announced they had made up and were forming a new band i was ecstatic.their songwriting history carries such a lot of baggage that to try and top dog man star and their 1993 debut would be a tough job.
with here come the tears they do it so effortlessly.standout tracks are the stunning ballads ghost of you and appollo 13,while refugees and lovers have the swagger that made suede so exciting all those years ago.if there's only one fault is it all sounds so polished that it doesn't capture the thrill of seeing them live( if you ever get the chance do so,bernard's the best guitarist i've ever seen).let's hope we get another album from them as i'm sure it will be a classic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It just like 1994 all over again, 8 Jun 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
The Tears represent the kind of second chance that most music fans never get- Morrissey & Marr have never reformed, Lennon & McCartney, Barat and Doherty, Ashcroft & McCabe... the list of failed songwriting duo's who never reformed to finish what they started is endless. However, we are lucky that Butler and Anderson failed to find any significant success on their own and so they decided to bury the hatchet and give it another go.
'Here Come The Tears' is not (as some lazy critics have suggested) Dog Man Star 2- it's far more measured and far less ambitious than that. What it is, however, is some of the finest guitar pop you will hear this year. Forget the (over produced) Coldplay record, or the better than expected Oasis album- The Tears have got somgwriting down to an art. Listen to Refugees- three minutes of pure pop. Or take Lovers- so catchy you will be humming that all summer. The album has moments of true beauty as well- Apollo 13's chorus of "I will follow you" is bound to make your hairs stand on end. Or listen to the emotional lyrics of 'The Ghost of You'- I have never heard the loss of someone close sung about so honestly. Then there is the closing 'A Love As Strong As Death'- subtle and yet so touching. An almost muted close to the album. No other band today- not even that new Coldplay record- can match the raw emotion in Brett's voice on this song. Amazing stuff.
If there is any criticism of this record it's that on a few ocasions Anderson's lyrcis touch on the triteness that made those last two Suede albums so terrible (Two Creatures and Imperfection are the main offenders). However, even these tracks have such a catchy melody that make you almost forgive the laziness of the words and he has (thankfully) given up with rhyming 'house' and 'mouse' as he did on Suede's 'Head Music'.
This is the album that Anderson and Butler should have followed Dog Man Star with in Suede (it would have gone down a storm in the musical enviroment of 1996 or 1997). Of course, that was never to be, but at least they have gone back and put history right.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars boy are they back!, 13 Jun 2005
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
To say this is the album I didn't expect to be made is an understatement but i'm so happy that the former warring foes have patched up their differences to give us this delightful offering. "Refugees" is perfect pop; instant, majestic, catchy, uplifting and brief. You feel the romance of Brett's characters as if you are one of them.
I have been a fan of both post Butler suede and the axe wizard's solo material and I have to say that this album is great but will be improved upon next time as these guys find their feet together. In the sad ballad "The Ghost of you" Bernard's sound colours the song in quiet reflective acoustic guitar picking, as well as a resplendent, bombastic crescendo to complement the rise in Brett's voice, moments that remind me of their previous work together on "Dog man star".
"Brave New Century" is a dirty twiddley riff the sort that made "We are the pigs" so atmospheric. There's too much to cherish here and i've only had the record four days and i'm already humming all the tunes. Any lapsed suede fans who have moved on will undoubtedly profit from purchasing this coming together of two great songwriters finally reunited.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, 25 Jun 2005
By 
patrick bateman (Calgary, Alberta Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
This album has not left my cd player since it arrived on my doorstep a week ago. being a very big suede fan i knew i was going to like it even if it was passable, especially considering that, for a while at least, i was enthusiastic about 'a new morning', suede's worst album by far, but this has surpassed my expectations.
so, to forget the past and concentrate on why this is good: yes, the lyrics are rather awful, laughable in places, but i don't think that that is a problem, particularly, because brett delivers them with a passion most singers would die to have. not only that but his voice on this album sounds amazing. the music, as well, while being maybe a little too dramatic in places, is soaring and glorious, beautful and intricate.
this album is well worth the buying. it may not be perfect, but to echo the song 'imperfection', those little inadvisable bits make it all the more appealing, to me at least. my favourite tracks are 'co-star', 'the ghost of you', 'two creatures', 'fallen idol' and 'a love as strong as death'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a terrific set of songs, 23 Jun 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
The biggest shock for me was is the fact that EVERY song on this album is enjoyable. A rare occurance. The best songs are of course terrific, far stronger than the last two Suede albums and BB's solo McA/B albums. Time will of course tell, but possibly on a par with 'Suede' and not far off 'Dog Man Star'. Considering the length of the album this is a major achievement.
Anderson's lyrics? These are high quality. A few persons have been critical of some of them, why? Take a listen to the so called 'greats' like Dylan, Lennon, Young (Neil not Will!), Mitchell etc. Not every song was a masterpiece of lyrical construction and creativity.
The band put in some great performances. Every track has interesting contributions. Needless to say BB's playing is as tasteful as ever and Anderson's singing is recapturing former glories. He sounds like he is ENJOYING himself again.
This will be one of the albums of the year.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Anderson & Butler reunite..., 23 April 2006
By 
Jason Parkes "We're all Frankies'" (Worcester, UK) - See all my reviews
(No. 1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
There is a rumour stated in John Harris' excellent account of the fall and rise of Britpop 'The Last Party' that somewhere between the 4th and 5th Suede album Bernard Butler offered to write songs for Anderson & co. 'Here Come the Tears' feels very like that - produced by Butler, with the musicians Butler has played with since the 1990s, and with the symphonic-pop he's made as a solo-artist and in collaboration with David McAlmont and Neneh Cherry. This might be a good thing, as Suede post-Butler had issues - 'Coming Up' was fine pop (the 'Rio' of Britpop?), but 'Head Music' was patchy stuff, drifting between Soft Cell-electropop and a band who sounded like a bad imitation of themselves. The final Suede LP was long in the making and involved the ditching of multiple songs, as it was reported in the press as a return to the sound of 'Suede' and 'Dog Man Star'...which is all a shame as Anderson & Butler's early work on those first two Suede albums and the related singles (see the first disc of 'Sci Fi Lullabies') ranks as some of the greatest music of the 1990s.

Butler is probably in a better place - recording an album proper with former Thieves-singer David McAlmont (they had previously recorded the singles 'Yes' and 'You Do' prior a split)and banishing the flop of second album 'Friends and Lovers.' 'Here Come the Tears' (the title apparently nods to Brian Eno's 'Here Come the Warm Jets') came at the right time, and conformed to Butler's symphonic, Spectoresque pop that has been his stock-in-trade since exiting shortly before 'Dog Man Star' was released.

I don't agree with the enthuasistic reviews here - 'Here Come The Tears' is OK, has the odd great moment (notably initial single 'Refugees')but certainly doesn't meet the standard of Anderson & Butler's prior collaboration. Perhaps this is unfair, it might be true that its unfair to compare The Tears to their prior work - but it's there.

I can't understand why this album didn't do well - there's lots of the kind of anthemic MOR-indie style that is popular these days - Coldplay, Keane, Embrace, Morrissey, that kind of thing. Which doesn't mean its bad, but a bit tame for my taste - then again, having rediscovered 'Dog Man Star' a few years ago, I'm unlikely to be as enamoured with this set? Maybe these songs were too obvious, too radio-friendly and too hit sounding? - trying too hard to flog their wares?

Still, it's all pretty listenable and would sound fine sitting round a flat while you're in love, buying shoes, or as dinner party background music. There's nothing as adventerous or as wild as 'Stay Together', 'The Wild Ones', 'Whipsnade', 'High Rising', 'Sleeping Pills', 'My Insatiable One', or 'She's Not Dead.' Unfair to say maybe, but there isn't. 'Here Come the Tears' is the best album Anderson has been involved with since 'Coming Up' - though the best songs here are more akin to Suede's 'Obsessions' than their earlier work. Perhaps if we lived in a singles culture, The Tears could have broke Anderson & Butler back in with a single or two, an e.p. or a mini-LP?

I hope the relative commercial and critical failure of 'Here Come the Tears' doesn't mean the end of their reunion - like the Go-Betweens, it might take an album or two to deliver a classic. 'Here Come the Tears' is better than the last two Morrissey albums, certainly shows promise - whether it's Butler's feedback on 'The Ghost of You' (reminded me a little of 'Daddy's Speeding'), the jangly joy that is 'Autograph' (The Smiths comparison is more than valid), or the catchiness of the two singles 'Refugees' and 'Lovers.' The last track suffers from having a title far too similar to The The's 'Love is Stronger Than Death'. Still, all is well when Brett mentions streets on the first track and offers an animal reference a track or two later! More please and better!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here Comes The Tears, 19 Jun 2005
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
This is by the greatest album of the year! Forget Coldplay and Oasis. This album is different to anything else out there at the moment and is far superior. Brett has certainly got his demon back and is voice is better than ever. Bernard is simply on fire, still the greatest guitarist of my generation. Nathan, Mako and Will are extremely talented individuals. So put down X&Y and get a copy of this album now, You will not regret it.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Effort by Two Brilliant Songwriters., 12 Sep 2005
By 
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
In 1994, the band SUEDE were on top of their game. While at the top, their chief songwriter lost his father and became unhappy with the image of the band and the demands of touring put on him by lead singer Brett Anderson. Masterful guitarist Bernard Butler left the band abruptly - leaving much of their sophomore album Dog Man Star unfinished. Anderson valiently laid down the guitar tracks, finished the album, recruited an obsessed fan (who claimed to know all the Suede guitar parts) as Butler's replacement and forged on. Their 3rd album 'Coming Up' was stellar - even without Butler. Bernard Butler is to Suede what Angus Young is to AC/DC.
While Richard Oakes was a competant replacement, he couldn't match the creativity of Butler and the following albums were gradually worse. Further, the band added additional so-called musicians to make the band a little less accessible. Neil Codling gave us the brilliant song "The Chemistry Between Us" and "She's In Fashion", but offered little more than pin-up looks for teenage girls and queens the world over. Alex Lee offered less than that - contributing to three throwaway songs off of their tired, but still good, effort "A New Morning".
Anderson and Suede did not speak with Butler for more than 10 years. Butler worked on a few side projects, including two excellent but unnoticed solo albums, before being contacted again by Brett Anderson.
They met in a pub in the Highgate area of London to work things out. Anderson explained that he was bored with Suede and knew it had come to its end. They created a new band called the Tears. Their first effort together since 1993 saw Butler again writing the music while Anderson wrote lyrics. The result is HERE COME THE TEARS.
For Suede fans, once they admit and accept that Suede will never get back together, this album will be just what the doctor ordered. The guitar and arrangement of melody is absolutely brilliant and Brett's lyrics and delivery sound strong and refreshed.
Available only on import, songs like "Autograph", "Apollo 13", "Refugees" and "Imperfection" are wonderful and ahead of their time. In an era that allows the likes of Enrique Iglesias and Kanye West to realise success at multi-platinum levels, this talent stands alone. It's a great album from front to back. Grade: A
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unmistakeably Anderson and Butler, 28 Jun 2005
By 
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
The brilliant guitar work on this album recall the days of early Suede whilst the vocal arrangements are more the sound of Suede circa "Head Music" and its b-sides. Therefore, you don't get 1993 Suede, but rather a refreshed new sound that makes you realize this reunion is exactly what Brett needed.

Bernard always maintained that he'd never dismiss working with Brett again. Visits to his website, a site in which he graciously answers fans' questions, he seemed less interested in making lush, rocking pop songs again, but he has indeed.

This is not Suede, but will be just what the doctor ordered for those who've missed them for years now. "Autograph" is brilliant and high-powered. "Imperfection" is classic Brett Anderson. "The Ghost of You" are probably Brett's most clever lyrics since "The Chemistry Between Us". Also on this record are "Lovers", "Refugees" and the likely third single "Apollo 13". "Apollo 13" is yet another brilliant and epic track. Critics: Here Come The Tears.... now be silenced.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shed No Tears........, 30 Dec 2005
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
This album is a lovely piece of work, even from the first listen. This is especially for those Suede fans who longed for the Butler/Anderson era to return!
Look at the price of it as well - what are you waiting for!?!
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