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145 of 150 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb deep and intense psychological dramas
Eric Rohmer's films have few characters, usually concentrating on a single human drama dissected in minute detail. But all the introspection is very human, it brings out the anguish, there is nothing cerebral about his films. His highly intelligent dialogue enables actors to submerge themselves in their characters bringing them intensely alive. Rohmer maintains visual...
Published on 18 May 2006 by Amazon Customer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ARROW FILMS lets us down (The Eric Rohmer Collection).
This is my second review of an Arrow Films product and once again it has not lived up to my expectations. The movies are all on individual discs and the casing is fine. Of the eight discs 6 have artwork reflecting the theme of the cover while the remaining 2 are totally different suggesting they are from a previous release that have been bundled into the set. All 8...
Published on 8 Mar. 2013 by David S. Graham


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145 of 150 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb deep and intense psychological dramas, 18 May 2006
By 
Amazon Customer (Bournemouth UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
Eric Rohmer's films have few characters, usually concentrating on a single human drama dissected in minute detail. But all the introspection is very human, it brings out the anguish, there is nothing cerebral about his films. His highly intelligent dialogue enables actors to submerge themselves in their characters bringing them intensely alive. Rohmer maintains visual interest with fine street and café locations around Paris, and eschews background music.

AVIATORS WIFE (1981) - the first or Rohmer's series on "Comedies and Proverbs" is one day in the life of Anne (Marie Riviere) single and twenty five pining over a failed love affair and ambivalent about her twenty year old student boyfriend Francoise (Philippe Marlaud) who believes she is cheating on him.

The aviator is Christian (Mathieu Carriere) and his wife is an absent role. Christian calls on Anne to tell her their affair is finally over and is seen leaving by Francoise.

LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON (1972) - Frederic (Bernard Verley) is contentedly married to the cool but affectionate Helene (Francoise Verley) and likes her that way. He is a man that finds companionship in the midst of a crowd, say on a bus train or street, likes feeling an anonymous part of an anonymous whole. In company he likes reading, even of an evening with his wife. He likes to imagine affairs with women he passes in the street, feeling safe in the knowledge that nothing can happen.

Then suddenly the tantalising Chloe (Zouzou), the lover of a past friend, comes back into his life tempting him into a tentative affair making Frederic examine his life.

FULL MOON IN PARIS (1984) - Love is not the problem where Louise (Pascale Ogier) and Remi (Tcheky Karyo) are concerned, it is a fundamental incompatibility, he likes sport and staying at home of an evening, whilst Louise enjoys parties and society. Remi is also possessive and in order to provide herself with the space she needs Louise spends nights at her old flat in Paris. Drawn into her problems are Octave (Fabrice Luchini) a male friend, and Camille (Virginie Thevenet) that Louise encourages to have an affair with Remi.

Tragically Pascale Ogier who won a Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival for her performance died of a heart attack at the age of 26 soon after completing the film.

PAULINE AT THE BEACH (1983) -. In superbly famed wide angle cinematography and figures moving within the wide expanses Rohmer wonderfully captures the aimless break from real life that is the seaside holiday.

The film is shot from the point of view of the naïve but clear sighted fifteen year old Pauline very well played by Amanda Langlet. Pauline observes her divorced cousin Marion (Arielle Dombasle) delude herself she has realised her fantasy of an unrealistically intense love in the amiable but detached womaniser Henri (Feodor Atkine). Whilst Pierre an ex lover Marion now regards as a friend and confidante deludes himself that one day she will return his jealous and enduring love for her.

A GOOD MARRIAGE (1982) - Sabine (Beatrice Romand) decides to part from her married boy friend and marry. Immediately she rushes off to her best friend Clarisse (Arielle Dombasle) and they decide to set her sights on Clarisse cousin Edmond whose signals are confusing. Although beautifully filmed in the historic town of Le Mans full of lovely stone buildings, just for once Rohmer's plot seems just that bit too contrived, Sabine is a convincing impetuous young woman but she deludes herself too easily.

MARQUISE OF O (1976) - this is a beautifully costumed film with superb cinematography, and lovely interior sets. The story is set in 1799 and if you can appreciate the stilted dialogue and stylised acting emulating stage performances of that period, it is a superb film. Many people consider this film a masterpiece, but accustomed to modern performance techniques I found the film ponderous and slow, the acting exaggerated and unnatural.

MY GIRLFRIENDS BOYFRIEND (1987) - this film seems less intense than Rohmer's normal dramas, but this is only on the surface, it is in the nature of the characters who are developed with all his usual skill. Blanche (Emanuelle Chaulet) is intelligent, articulate except that with men she fancies she clams up. A chance meeting with Lea (Sophie Renoir) leads to a close friendship, and she becomes friendly with Lea's boyfriend Fabien (Eric Viellard) whilst fancying Alexandre (Francois-Eric Gendron). Lea and Fabien's relationship is deteriorating and when Lea visits relations and leaves them together Blanche finds she can talk to Fabien, because he is a friend?

THE GREEN RAY (1986) - Delphine (Marie Riviere) is an emotionally detached woman who has been engaged to Jean Pierre who works abroad (he never appears in the film) for two years and lives on her own. At the last minute her girl friend pulls out of their trip to Greece leaving Delphine on her own during a six week summer holiday. The shock focuses Delphine's mind on her loneliness and the film follows her gradual disintegration into depression. This is superbly acted and directed and psychologically accurate. Delphine is not a character we warm to, in fact she would infuriate me in real life with her long rambling monologues as her loneliness gradually erodes her ability to communicate.

Probably the best film in a superb DVD set, but may not be to everyone's taste.

FINAL COMMENT - This is a very nicely presented boxed set, there are a lot of extras mainly interviews and comments by Eric Rohmer, two shorts from early in his career, however the promised four page booklet was missing from my set.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short stories in film, 6 Mar. 2007
This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
This collection gave me a lot of pleasure (apart from Marquis of O which I haven't managed to finish yet despite several attempts.)Yes, his films are all talk but if you value strong characterisation in films you will be drawn in - more like televised plays in their intimacy than cinema. They're very modern films - his characters are basically good people trying to find, or create, values to live by often thwarted by their own selfishness and loneliness. The Green Ray is probably the best with a tremendously intense central performance; Pauline at the Beach is everyone's memory of the golden summer you think you once had, and I also loved The Good Marriage - the ultimate film of how men and women don't really understand each other. My Girlfriend's boyfriend (much better in French "L'ami de mon amie")is set in the "new" suburb of Cergy-Pontoise, clean, carefully designed and somehow, completely soulless. You get a sense of people trying to forge relationships without any real sense of roots or community - very contemporary though it was made in the 80s. Some of the extras are quite illuminating with Rohmer explaining the thinking behind the shooting of some scenes.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars purest cinematic joy ..., 8 Feb. 2012
By 
schumann_bg - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
This box set offers the greatest imaginable pleasure one could have from eight films, each of which is a masterpiece in my opinion, except possibly Le beau mariage, but then that one is just as good as the others really, and cannot be faulted, it just has a more 'difficult' surface appropriate to the heroine's character. The pleasure in a film like L'amour, l'apres-midi or L'ami de mon amie is just more obvious as you're watching. I say this, but a part of one can also be thinking 'What on earth is this supposed to be?', they are so deceptively simple; sequences can easily appear clunky, such as the dance scenes in Le beau mariage or Les nuits de la pleine lune, or the way characters dress or do their hair. Then suddenly you realise that in fact what seemed so ordinary and artless was in fact part of a carefully worked out structure, and that trifling dialogues are being used to reveal the essence of human emotion. It is this disparity between a banal-seeming surface and the intellectual rigour that underpins it that gives his films their special quality. L'amour, l'apres-midi is possibly the most moving of all Rohmer films in its final scene, and one of the most beguiling as a visual entity, whereas Pauline a la plage has the most elaborate plot involving five characters who are made to dovetail in and out of entanglements with dizzying virtuosity. It is as light as a souffle yet so exquisitely wrought; maybe a detailed model made of balsa wood gets it better ... Die Marquise von O. was his only production in German, with a wonderful performance by Bruno Ganz. It is no less than thrilling to hear the Rohmer style brought to bear on the Kleist story, and I for one love the result! It may try the patience of some, as may the very long discussion at the end of La femme de l'aviateur or the endless obstinacy of the girl in Le beau mariage, so painfully unresolved. Or the moaning of Delphine in scene after scene of Le rayon vert, almost comical in its repetitiveness, but the pay-off in the end wouldn't have been possible without it. Rohmer often pushes our empathy with a character to the limit, but builds to a conclusion of surprising intensity and resonance. You leave with a feeling of harmony and empathy with the rhythms of human life, as if the director, with his camera, has brought into focus our own lens on the world.

Further comment on Die Marquise von O.: What a great era the 70s were for cinema - it is amazing to think that in the year this film won a prize at Cannes, you might also have caught Johan at the same festival, and the incredible Un enfant dans la foule ... alas, I don't think there are so many cinematic joys to be had at any festival now. One of the things that's striking about this film is the way it is based on the kind of story you might read in the tabloids; it could be quite vulgar, given that it is based on a man taking advantage of a woman in her sleep and the 'inexplicable' pregnancy that results, but Kleist's novella gives it a highly elevated treatment with an allegorical aspect adding to its psychological depth (the story of the swan). The conscious and unconscious promptings of the two main characters, as well as the changing reactions of the woman's parents, give the story a superb depth, while the surface remains true to both Kleist's mystery and Rohmer's sense that the world almost exists through dialogues. The elegance of the German, and the lengths to which the explanations go, make for a most pleasing surface which asserts good manners as much as what has happened contradicts them. We are also led to ponder the significance of his act, while this is the one thing that is never discussed - can we reconcile rape with a decent character, as he seems to be? The answer to this seems to be yes, magnanimously, but only because of the exceptional circumstances. And this does not mean that his actions were acceptable, of course. Does the context of a military siege of a citadel make it more explicable? And the fact that he saved her from being raped by a whole group of soldiers - who were subsequently executed for the attempt, although he tried to stop it? The tone of irony is beautifully sustained, and at the same time the compositions recreate the world familiar from German paintings of the period and give much pleasure. The graceful camerawork of Nestor Almendros has a lot to do with this: whenever he is chief cameraman, as with Sven Nykvist, you know that there will be a lot to enjoy visually in the film ... It is also interesting to see Bruno Ganz and Otto Sander together, given that they both appeared with wings on in Wings of Desire ten years later. The Rohmer film stands as one of the great examples of a masterpiece in one medium blending perfectly into another to create another great work - I can think of few films that give more refined pleasure.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rich Comedies, 19 Oct. 2008
By 
G. R. Jones "Geraint" (Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
This set includes all six of Rohmer's 'Comedies et Poverbes'. As other reviewers have said, these are centred around detailed character, developed in a way that most film-makers don't give themselves time for. What I'd like to add is that the situations these characters find themelves in, while serious for them, are often comic for us - we can see what they can't, about themselves and their relationships. For me, this turns what could be quite miserable stories into something illuminating about the way in which we mistake the events and people around us. Rohmer's treatment of his characters is generally sympathetic, so we don't laugh at them - Marion in 'Pauline at the Beach' is an exception - her self centred maniplations geting her what she deserves.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I show people who move and speak", 7 Oct. 2013
By 
technoguy "jack" (Rugby) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
List of Rohmer films from The Eric Rohmer Collection in date order/preference order
Love in the Afternoon 1972 1) The Green Ray
The Marquess of O 1976 2) Pauline at the Beach
The Aviator's Wife 1980 3)Love in the Afternoon
A Good Marriage 1982 4)The Aviator's Wife
Pauline at the Beach 1983 5)The Marquise of O
Full Moon in Paris 1984 6)A Good Marriage
The Green Ray 1986 7)Full Moon in Paris
My Girlfriend's Boyfriend 1987 8) My Girlfirend's Boyfriend

Rohmer shot this series of 8 films over 15 years.They contain the whole Comedies and Proverbs series,where Rohmer turned to young heroines after his ironic focus on middle-aged males in the Moral Tales.In this series he consistently offered rewarding lead roles to women,notably Marie Riviere(The Green Ray) and Beatrice Romand(AGood Marriage),who rounded off the 4 Seasons as a triumphant double act in A Tale of Autumn.The outstanding episode,The Green Ray, where a woman can't decide where to spend her holiday,is distinguished by naturalistic shooting and a loose improvisational style at odds with Rohmer's usual formality. Throughout his films, characters lie to themselves almost more than to each other and this is, in part, what gives Rohmer's films so much of their warm irony and comedy. Rohmer, as a Catholic, sees the revelation of truth to them as coming via grace, in Full Moon in Paris by the grace of suffering. Whether it be the light of the sun in Le Rayon vert (1986), Rohmer interjects into the lives of his characters occurrences of the natural world that are outside of their control,or in this case it is a full moon which affects the main character, causing her suffering but also enabling a revelation. Louise has learned about choice and responsibility, and though for a time she may be saddened, is the better for it.The banality of the quotidian is invested with epihanic moments.

What Rohmer shows us in "My Girlfriend' Boyfriend" are the benign manipulations of people in love. He's expert at revealing the shifting geometry between the players,but Rohmer is a sympathetic filmmaker. He never condemns his characters - he merely presents them as they are and lets the viewer decide whether or not they are deserving of affection. In this case, he shows that, despite their superficialities, they are flesh-and-blood individuals, not comic contrivances or caricatures. Rohmer shows that friendship and love are two sides of the same coin. Sex is not much of an issue here; instead, this is about people connecting or failing to connect. Rohmer regards his heroines with considerable sympathy, and they're utterly convincing in their absorption in matters of the heart, and often more complex characters than the men in their lives.A Mozartian lightness, tight-plotting,a directing style of seeming simplicity,willing non-professional actors,minimal crews and everyday locations,embody the nouvelle vague's founding principles of economy.Rohmer's work is that of the total auteur from written subject to final image,powered by dialogue that reveals the character's inner life.Pauline at the Beach is a playful yet probing exploration of love and fidelity,a sunny,engaging film with captivating performances,one of the best introductions to his work.Pauline is initiated into the deceptions and hypocrisies of the adult world.Will her honesty survive her growing sexuality? Why do we prefer to be complemented rather than mirrored?

Beneath the surface of comedy in these films is a reality of pain which prevents them becoming whimsical. People's attempts to understand and be understood.In The Aviator's Wife Rohmer is confident to let his audience savour the subtle interactions among the players and keeps it vibrant.What is love to a 20 year old young man?Why do women say one thing and do another?The balance between reality and fantasy is kept.Love in the Afternoon & The Marquise of O fall outside of this main group,both are masterpieces.Rohmer was far more conservative than his fellow New Wave auteurs and broke with them when Cahiers du Cinema became too radically leftist.Despite writing about Hitchcock there is no suspense or much action in his films. Rohmer is particularly attuned to the romantic posturing of young men and women as they pursue the eternal dance. "It is better to see all my films together as a collection. There is a relationship between all the films and that is where the interest lies." In these last two films the cinematography is brilliantly done: many photographed by cinematographer Nestor Almendros. The sensitivity to colour palette and lighting is exquisite.He documents changing social and sexual mores.Love in the Afternoon shows 1972's conservatism.

The Marquise of O is a transposition of Kleist's teasing 19th century novella about a chaste young widow( who had sworn faithfulness to her late husband) suffering a pregnancy which she insists can only be the result of an immaculate conception.She announces in the paper that she is pregnant and wishes for the father of her child to present himself inorder to marry him.There is a public furore as her father is in charge of the citadel of their Italian town.The family chateau had been stormed and the Marquise(Edith Clavel,erotic,emotional) is assaulted by Russian soldiers and rescued by the Count(Bruno Ganz,charming,eccentric).With a hint of Barry Lyndon in the sensuous,painterly direction and cinematography. The motives of the count in offering Julietta his hand inmarriage and the longing looks which the two main `suspects' give her while she sleeps are two main Rohmer teases. Rohmer has delivered a gorgeous delight and captured the audience's heart like storming a fortress.This is in German.

`I do not say, I show,' he insisted, `I show people who move and speak.'Rohmer turned his literary intelligence into a cinematic sensibility and he repeatedly made variations of the same film,which is why he organised his body of work into related series.Over 40 years he treated the same subject 6 times over" in the hope that, by the sixth time, the audience would come to me!", his films deal with educated young adults from the haute bourgeois engaged in endless conversation and a comedy of manners.All I can say is what a birthday present this collection will be to anyone who receives it.What an education in film,by an articulate,resonant intelligence(1910-2010).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Cinema!, 9 Mar. 2010
By 
Gary Hanna (Newry, N. Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
Eric Rohmer's films are subtly brilliant. They are mediations on a world of thoughts and emotions that rest beneath the banality of every day existence. On the surface the stories may appear simplistic the technique of filming minimal, but herein lies their genius, for in a sense Rohmer represents pure cinema, filming the subconscious itself through the distractions of the world around us. Meticulous scripts, carefully chosen décor and amazingly realised performances enhance the vision contained within. In an age of heavily edited "movies" manipulated purely for effect, to relax with the pace of the films in this box set is to enjoy something more profound, something that will stay long after the closing credits.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ARROW FILMS lets us down (The Eric Rohmer Collection)., 8 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
This is my second review of an Arrow Films product and once again it has not lived up to my expectations. The movies are all on individual discs and the casing is fine. Of the eight discs 6 have artwork reflecting the theme of the cover while the remaining 2 are totally different suggesting they are from a previous release that have been bundled into the set. All 8 movies are 4-5 minutes shorter than the original release (according to IMDB) and the transfers vary from good to not much better than VHS (the best transfers were on the 2 discs with seperate art work again suggesting these came from another release). It is possible that these are the best copies available but for films from the 80s I doubt it. The aspect ratios weren't too far off the originals however one movie looked like it was 1.77:1 transferred in a 4:3 aspect with the result there were black bars on all 4 sides of the screen - horrible. The only saving grace for this box set was the fact I got it for 17 quid so that's just over 2 quid a movie so for a general movie collector like myself that's an OK deal. If you are a Rohmer fan then I would suggest looking at other releases.The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD]
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great collection, 26 Jun. 2011
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
This is a great collection of films. I know some people struggle with Rohmer, but there is something very true and charming about his plots and characters, which are usually within the realms of many people's experiences. However, a combiniation of great direction and convincing actors raise these tales above the mundane realities of life. I particularly love 'My girlfriend's boyfriend', which playfully depicts the life of young people and the simple adventures many of us experience in realy adulthood. And The Green Ray explores lost love, loneliness and unwanted attentions so honestly, adeptly.

The characters throughout these tales are haunting and memorable.

Not for everyone, but definitely for this French cinema fan.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent selection but why the inappropriate widesreen version on one disc?, 26 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
Nice collection of French new Wave master Eric Rohmer's middle-period work includes all 6 titles from the COMEDIES & PROVERBS series as well as the atypical costume drama MARQUISE OF O... and slightly curiously LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON, the last of his "Six Moral Tales" series which seems out of place.
The picture quality overall is excellent but PAULINE ON THE BEACH is shown in a 14:9 format instead of the correct 3:4 and thus loses some of the original composition and also a little of the image quality. None of the others have been treated this way so one wonders what on earth the idea was? It's well known the director was very keen on his work being presented in the correct format.He would not be pleased
The extras are a bit of a mixed bag, on some discs the director is interviewed about the film featured, which is interesting, but not on others and so it feels a little bit untidy and randwom. A 16mm short film is included and other little extras all add a little to the overall value for money. Just a pity they messed about with that one film format!
It's a good set overall and if you like Rohmer's films (he's certainly not to everyone's taste) then you'll enjoy it thoroughly. His films mostly seem to improve on second or third viewings so are perfect for DVD and 6 of the 8 here are more upbeat and less philosophical that the earlier MORAL TALES series.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One minor cavil . . ., 14 Mar. 2010
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Acritical (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD] (DVD)
This is not a review of Eric Rohmer's films. It is a minor complaint about the box-set. So far I have watched 'The Green Ray', 'Pauline at the Beach', 'Love in the Afternoon', and 'My Girlfriend's Boyfriend'. With the exception of 'My Girlfriend's Boyfriend', the films all seem very good transfers. 'Pauline at the Beach', for instance, is visually luscious. Which brings me to my complaint. 'My Girlfriend's Boyfriend' is an absolutely awful transfer. I actually bought the box-set for this film. I am interested in films shot around the period 1985-90, especially those which include real locations. I watched 'My Girlfriend's Boyfriend' on television recently, and the picture quality was excellent. However, the disc version suffers from dodgy purple-tinted white-balance, scan-lines appear every time somebody moves, even the red-brick buildings in the background flicker with stripes. It is well below par. If you are buying this box-set for 'My Girlfriend's Boyfriend', especially after seeing it on television, it will disappoint.
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