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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just Fabulous
The rush of lengthy reviews for this album are a little tiresome, as is the ridiculous snobery of the reviewer who assumes that a fellow reviewer hasn't listened to QOTSA albums before 'Songs for the Deaf'simply because he alludes to the absence of Dave Grohl- get over yourself man!! The politics aside, this album is a joy. Guitar heaven from start to finish; highlights...
Published on 25 Mar 2005 by MISS RACHEL M MCINTOSH

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The weakest QOTSA album.
I've left writing a review for this album for a long time to see if I would grow to love it more but I'm afraid I haven't. There are some briliant songs on here (Burn the Witch, Somethings in the Wolf) but it just gets too repetetive in the second half. Rated R and SftD both had a much wider range of musical styles. Lullabies gets stuck in a robotic-sleaze sound for most...
Published on 10 Mar 2007 by B. A. Chiverton


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You'll fall in love with the Queens all over again, 27 Mar 2005
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
The first and most important thing to say about Lullabies to Paralyze is that it isn't Songs for the Deaf, as the moronic one-star reviewer (see below) was clearly hoping it would be. If SFTD was crack cocaine (a drug analogy seems appropriate - this is QOTSA, after all), then LTP is 17th-century poets' favourite laudanum; it creeps up on you rather than giving it to you all at once, but the high is ultimately deeper and more satisfying.
As other reviewers have said, this album is a classic example of a "grower". Fans of SFTD and R's immediacy will be disappointed on the first listening - fear not. Chuck it on repeat, fix yourself a pot of coffee and listen to it all night, again and again and again and again and again. After the fourth or fifth time, you'll wonder how you ever lived without the beautifully-handled gear change in Everybody Knows That You Are Insane, the stomping, paganistic euphoria of Burn the Witch, the magnificent (if eclectic) sonic odyssey of album centrepieces Someone's in the Wolf and The Blood is Love... I could easily go on. All you need to know is this - if you don't already own Lullabies to Paralyze, buy it. If you do already own it, buy another one.
It's time to continue our worship at the Temple of Homme. Don't miss out.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Queens of the Stone Age are back, 23 Mar 2005
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Queens of the Stone Age's new album is a new step forward for the group. The sound is completely different to Songs For the Deaf, Rated R or their self-titled debut album. It is darker but lighter, heavier but softer reflecting the ambience and atmosphere of a forest in the middle of the night. The album clearly contains a blues rock sound, rather than a stoner rock groove in places with Duane Allman style slide guitar and the guitarist from ZZ Top contributing on certain tracks. The highlights of the album include "In my Head", "Medication" and "Little Sister". My only criticism is that Skin on Skin and The Blood is Love are very long. Even so I shouldn't complain as that's value for money. Rock on QOTSA!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twisted Brilliance, 9 Mar 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Ok so there is no Nick Oliveri, but who cares? Troy Van Leeuwen and Alain Johannes are better musicians anyway, and without Nick there are no rubbish "shouting" filler tracks. Anyone remember the ear achingly awful "Six Shooter" from Songs for the deaf, the only bad song on the album? This just goes to show that QOTSA always was about the awesome Josh Homme. This album has a dark, twisted edge to it, provided by Hommes fuzzy guitar grooves and the scary lyrics. Standout songs are "Medication", "Everybody knows that you're insane", "Burn the witch", and "Someones in the Wolf". "Little Sister" is also a brilliantly catchy single. All the other songs are good. Buy this album and hear the mighty QOTSA at their best!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock's 1st seminal album of the 21st century, 25 May 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Rarely, does an album achieve a totality, in which that it threatens to gatecrash true 'classic' album status. 'Lullabies to Paralyze' is such a work.
Those familiar with previous albums such as Rated R, and Songs for the Deaf, may be concerned that with the departure (sacking) of founder member Nick Oliveri, that some of the Queens anarchic magic may be lost.
This, sure as hell, is Josh Homme's band now. Oliveri thrash metal gems such as 'Tension Head' are no longer on the menu.
Sentimentality for Oliveri aside, this shift in direction displays far more control, discipline and ingenuity, than in any previous work.
Make no mistake however, this is a hard edged, dark, rocker of a Queens album.
Where 'Lullabies' departs from previous releases, is in their brand of west coast psychedelic rock (which has always ran parallel to their hard metal aspirations); has been developed and integrated to a better and more consistant effect.
'Lullabies' flows effortlessly from track to track in the way which all 'classic' albums should. It is simply a first track to last journey; there is nowhere to skip a track here or there. Each track is so well constructed and positioned to its neighbours, that it is impossible to offer anything in the way of stand out tracks. It is all superb!!
If anything, this cd can be defined by its 2 'bonus tracks' (usually the ones not as good as the duffers on lesser bodies of work). Either could easily be 'stand out' tracks elsewhere.
Indeed the bonus tracks provide the best insight into the balance between blues rock and psychedelia to which this album so skillfully straddles.
I'll leave it other reviewers to catalogue 'Lullabies' on a track by track basis. Me, I'm off for a wholely unneccessary drive in my car for the next hour and a bit.
A masterpiece!!
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Marvellous!, 9 Mar 2005
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Please ignore the idiot who gave this one star, they are clearly a Grohlite newbie who has no idea about anything and probably doesn't even own Rated R or The Self Titled album...
Most reviews I've read of this spent hald the review talking aboit Nick leaving, so I won't. Josh Homme has said that this record is like the S/T, and certainley with Nick gone (oh dear, I mentioned it) it could quite easily have been a return to the robotic riffery of that record (no, Nick doesn't play on it even though he is on the cover) but I don't see it at all.
I'll do a lazy track by track, 'cos I can't bothered writing a proper review.
LTP begins with a little acoustic ditty called "Lullaby" sung by Mark Lanegan and then goes straight into familiar territory with the pounding stop/start guitars of "Medication" which clocks in at under two minutes.
EKTYI starts out with some nice slide guitar, abut after about a minute you'd be forgiven for wondering where the song is going, but then in comes a big loud guitar-heavy chorus, and you go...."ahh" It sounds like it shouldn't fit, but it does. Great stuff.
Tangled Up In Plaid is quite similar in that it floats about for a minute or two and then the bouncy geetars come in.
There's a few bluesier sounds on this album compared to the others, and this is particularly evident in the magnificent Billy Gibbons-of-ZZ-Top-featuring "Burn The Witch" and the penultimate track "YGAKSTM." "Burn The Witch" is a genius. That's all I have to say on the matter. Mark Lanegan comes in with some gruff backing vocals halfway and it makes you go "woooh."
The next two songs, In My Head (as featured in the Desert Sessions 9&10) and Little Sister demonstrate Homme's ability to write great poppy songs, and while some may think the record company made them put them on the album so it would sell, the quality of the songs holds up. In My Head is a bit faster than the DS version and has some nice Hommey harmonies towards the end, while Lil Sis features a pretty weird solo for a poppy single, and is much better than I first thought it was. Cowbell too, what more could you want?
"I Never Came" drags on a bit to be honest...
Someone's In The Wolf (quite possibly the next single) is genius too. And it features one of those "it's getting faster" "even faster" "has it got as fast as it's gonna get now?" "NO!!! Even faster" moments which hasn't been on a Queens record since that song I can't remember off Rated R because the tracklisting is all messed up.
The "Blood Is Love" maybe outstays it's welcome, but it's pretty good.
"Skin On Skin" is all about sex, incase you didn't know. Josh is horny, get out of his way! More genius, featuring some dubious lyrics and great Zipper noises and then a post-coital Cigarette.
"Broken Box" - catchy goodness, reminds me of Millionaire for some reason.
"Killer Scene" - already mentioned, but it's got a great bluesy groove going on and HANDCLAPS! Yay. I was wondering when we'd get some.
"Long Slow Goodbye" - great song, not especcially Queens-ish, but in a good way. Then there's a big finale thing and we're done.
So overall, on first listen I was disappointed, second/third/fourth I got it, and it seems to be getting better with every listen. I dont see it overtaking the other three Queens albums in terms of greatness (1-S/T 2 -SFTD 3-Rated R) and it doesn't seem as ambitious as those. Lyrically I was quite disappointed too - it's much more open and unambiguous than the first three albums, in a bad way. Having said that, it's an extremely good record, and at a time where every band is ripping off 80's post punk or singing MOR rubbish about nothing, it's a breath of fresh air.
4.5 if I could...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lullabies to Paralyze, 29 April 2005
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Following Songs for the Deaf is quite a steep mountain to climb, with the amount of hype over that album, there were chances that this album could have just slipped away without even noticing. The departure of Nick Oliveri did not really help in the process, but it was always Joshua Homme that controlled the driving wheel of Queens of the Stone Age.
Lullabies to Paralyze sounds like Josh's brainchild, there is no signs of 'screaming' here. Beginning with a tastefully dark acoustic intro (This Lullaby) performed by Mark Lanegan, the album gets darker and creepier as it goes along, culminating on the epic two parter 'Someone's in the Wolf' and 'The Blood is Love'.
The fact that they released Little Sister as the first single from here gives a good introduction to the record as it is possibly one of the weaker songs here. My favourites have to be Burn the Witch, Someone's in the Wolf, Skin on Skin and Broken Box.
As a whole you will be braindead to find a better rock n roll album this year. Sorry everybody but that this the truth. Buy it now. :-)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind Blowing, 22 Mar 2005
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Please completely disregard the review by the seemingly brainless person who rated this a one star-it is almost perfect-and everything and more than we could expect from QOTSA's latest offering.
This album is not as instantly catchy as its predecessers-it does not have the clever gimmics seen on SFTD and Rated R, but what it may lack in imagination it makes up for artistic, musical and lyrical genius. The songs are amazingly deep, a mixture of raw rock classics such EKYI and little sister to more deep powerful awe inspiring epics such as Burn the Witch and the blood is love. It shows the sheer talent of Homme and his new bandmates, and though the bass lines are not as powerful as the mad man Nick Oliveri used to beat out, they are more than ample.
If you are a QOTSA fan you will love this album, it does take a few listens and is not as instantly accessable as some of there earlier work. but it is a masterpiece, no question about it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back To Stoner Rock, 10 July 2005
By 
DocBhoy (Invercargill , New Zealand) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
Following up 2002's 'Songs For The Deaf' was never going to be easy for Josh Homme , especially in light of his ( very public ) split with Nick Olivieri , the band's bass player . Also there was no return for Dave Grohl on drums with this album .
We needn't have worried - Josh has pulled a 16 song album out of the hat that is full of riff after infectious riff , vocal and guitar talents ( both his own , as well as Mark Lanegan and Billy Gibbons , most notably ) and a more stoner-like groove harking back to 2000's 'Rated R' . In fact , the inclusion of other vocalists gives the album a more varied texture than 'Songs...' , and considering that album's strengths , that can only be a good thing .
Worth it for all those who are fans of QOTSA , Screaming Trees , Mark Lanegan , and great guitar music .
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just as it should be..., 15 April 2005
By 
IWFIcon - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Ignore my slightly warped liking for the wonderful Josh Homme, this is one hell of a rock record and one that, for once, deserves every bit of critical acclaim that has come it's way.
From start to finish this is a rollocking ride which is even better than previous classics Rated R and Songs For The Deaf. Stand out tracks include the single Little Sister, You Got A Killer Scene (featuring guest performances by Brode Dalle and Shirley Manson) and Everybody Knows That You're Insane. Although to be honest, choosing favourite songs from this album is much like choosing which of your offspring is your favourite.
So this is rock as it should be. Dark, edgy and, above all, sexy. Buy it now.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Show must go on, 21 Jun 2005
This review is from: Lullabies To Paralyze (Audio CD)
With all the furore surrounding this album's release about the sordid departure of bassist Nick Oliveri, and the notable absence of drummer Dave Grohl (who contributed brilliantly to 'Songs for the Deaf') you could be forgiven for thinking that this album would be average at best. However, one has to realise that average for the Queens of the Stone Age is equivalent to an eponymous album for any other band. I'll concede that Nick Oliveri provided some of the best moments in previous albums, with his delightful bass lines. Previous albums certainly emphasised the bass line. The potent bass-line is no longer so prevalent in Lullabies to Paralyse but Homme cranks up the amp distortion and produces riff after riff.
The dark, bleak themes run throughout; this is certainly not an chilled album to accompany a party or a floor filler, but is more wholesome and potent. It is difficult to choose a stand out track as most songs follow the typical Queens format, and a mighty good format it is too. Homme sings with his powerful yet tuneful voice, whilst the riff stomps behind, and the drummer thumps frenetically. Medication is the stand out track, providing a rock hard riff with a melodic, soulful bridge. There is a real sense of the band working off one another; while Homme hums, the riff churns and the lead guitar squeals.
Five Star Songs
Little Sister is an upbeat, thumping track with a electric guitar hook that sends shivers down your spine -
Skin on Skin is a sleazy, laid back song with little structure, but is still eseroteric and drudgy -
Like a Drug is my favourite track that doesn't come under any genre, with a bluesy picked guitar hook, and a melodic groove, whilst Homme soulfully croons into the mic.
Overall? A splendid album that captures on the unique Queens recipe and adds several unique tracks such as Like a Drug. Worth the purchase for casual or fanatic Queens fans, perhaps not for the unitiated. Songs for the Deaf is a better buy for newcomers.
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Lullabies To Paralyze
Lullabies To Paralyze by Queens Of The Stone Age (Audio CD - 2005)
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