Customer Reviews


46 Reviews
5 star:
 (22)
4 star:
 (17)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best album since Technique!
Like many longtime fans I had given up. After the awful Republic in 1993 (admitedly the single Regret was a wonderful 'goodbye') New Order split up and disappeared. They became part of the past. The comeback began in 1999 with Out Of Control on The Chemical Brother's Surrender album. The break with keyboards, guitar and Barney going 'woo!' in time honoured tradition...
Published on 7 July 2006 by Nik

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Autumn Hour
This album has many producers behind the wheel, and i personally miss there production, as it had elements of humour and a experimental edge . Since abandoning Factory they have had a easier life, and the money is coming in thick and fast so they can afford to pick and choose who ever they want to work with .
I think a New Order album needs a full production from...
Published on 1 May 2005


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best album since Technique!, 7 July 2006
By 
Nik (Hull, East Riding Of Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
Like many longtime fans I had given up. After the awful Republic in 1993 (admitedly the single Regret was a wonderful 'goodbye') New Order split up and disappeared. They became part of the past. The comeback began in 1999 with Out Of Control on The Chemical Brother's Surrender album. The break with keyboards, guitar and Barney going 'woo!' in time honoured tradition brought a sloppy grin as I heard the old magic in a new song. 2001's Get Ready album was a joy to have but close inspection revealed only 3 REALLY good tracks (Crystal, Slow Jam & Run Wild).
Waiting For The Siren's Call however has 10 great tracks (skip Working Overtime) several of which stand up to their 80's best.
The silly but emotive simple rhyming lyrics, the synth led sound with great guitar - bass interplay, the stacato drumming; the year might be 2005 but it feels like 1989 as that was the last time New Order were this good!
Krafty is a fix of happiness, I Told You So is wonderful cod reggae that feels like it should follow Mr Disco on Technique, the title track is on a par with Bizarre Love Triangle, Barney's singing as good as he's ever been and Turn bittersweet and poignant as only New Order can be.
New Order may not be so 'new' anymore but as current trends lead back to 80's music why bother with kid's copying when the real thing sounds better!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New Order Philosophy 101, 1 April 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
Firstly I am a big NO fan - from about 1987 and hearing "Substance" then buying their back catalogue of albums and every album since.
Having heard this album several times now and just read all the online reviews here on Amazon, I have reached the conclusion that there is a very definite split between hardcore NO fans.
Tracks evoke different emotions and some are loved or hated seemingly equally. Perhaps that is the genius of NO - they have a huge following yet nobody can quite put their finger on and agree on where that genius lies.
For my part I think the tracks here owe more to Electronic, Johnny Marr, and Bernard Sumner and the NO of "Get Ready" than they do to the New Order behind Technique, Blue Monday, True Faith, and Republic. There are undertones of "Republic" but anyone who says there is a strong vein of pop songs like "Technique" must be listening to a completely different album.
One thing bothering me at the moment is the track listing - Who's Joe and Hey Now What You Doing have lyrically identical first lines! Didn't someone point this out to the boys before they decided to put them together on the album?!
Personally I like "I told you so", "Morning Night & Day" and "Jetstream" - dislikes are "Dracula's Castle" which I find really doesn't fit in with the other tracks here and "Working Overtime" which is just kind of blah really.
Doubtless some will agree with me, but like I said, many other NO fans will totally disagree. I think it is testimony to NO's diversity that this is so, and proves that no matter your taste in music there is always room for NO in your music collection.
Things that never change are Bernard Sumners voice (which lets be honest, may be unique, but is ultimately rubbish) and Hooky's unmistakable bass sound. I think they could have been bolder with this album and drifted more towards electronic pop (an updated Technique style that they claimed it would be) so it kind of ends up in a musical no mans land as a result. Some of the reviews that claim this is a bit of a dull album aren't far from the mark therefore.
It's by no means a bad album, just not genius.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This isn't commercialism, its evolution., 26 April 2005
By 
Lukester (Brit living in the USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
New Order are one of the best bands in the World, fact. If they had surrendered to commercialism in the eighties I think they would have sat at the top of it, however this doesn't mean they would have produced the brilliant records that they do. I for one think we are lucky to have them. How many bands can say they went on to be more successful after the death of a charismatic and gifted member? How many bands can say they released singles that don't appear on albums? Yes New Order have gone more commercial since the factory demise, but they didn't have much choice. I know Hooky never made any money until he was in his mid thirties, so come on.
This latest album is probably the best thing since Technique. There is the foul stench of 'radio friendliness' in the single Krafty, but I think on the strength of songs like 'Turn' and Morning, Night and Day, and 'Hey Now what you doing.' You know you are listening to the New Order of old.
I think over time this will be a classed classic New Order.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just enjoy it!!!, 28 Mar 2005
By 
Lu�s Angelo dos Santos Aracri (Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro Brazil) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
New Order is back again and with an album. Remembering the old times, WAITING FOR THE SIRENS' CALL sounds like a collection of early songs that never were released before. With Phil Cunningham replacing Gillian Gilbert on guitar and keyboards, the reborn New Order found breath to write pulsating songs that can conquer new admirers and satisfy demanding fans. "Krafty", the new single, is a synthesis of their twenty five years career and it places New Order in a warm space in the pop scene. Mixing electro and slim rock, basic rhythm guitars and synth beats, their music refuses to accept easy labels. And that's cool.
This four piece band from Manchester (UK) was the first dance oriented post-punk group in the World. Without New Order we wouldn't have Moby, Chemical Brothers, Doves, Franz Ferdinand, Interpol and The Killers. And WAITING FOR THE SIRENS' CALL confirms that. Produced by New Order and also by Stephen Street, John Leckie and Stuart Price, the new album recovers the past with dignity and reaffirms their influence over forming bands in England. And now they're much more a guitar based band than an electronic pop group.
WAITING FOR THE SIRENS' CALL have wonderful songs: "Who's Joe?", the opening track, is one of them; "Hey Now What You're Doing" and "Morning Night and Day" have the essence of the eighties; "Dracula's Castle" is a kind of soft dark rock and have an unexpected bass line; we can dance with "I Told You So", "Jetstream" and "Guilty is a Useless Emotion" (this is the "party side" of the album); "Turn" is a sunny sub-TECHNIQUE song; and the amazing "Working Overtime" sounds like The Stooges.
This album is not for fans only. WAITING FOR THE SIRENS' CALL contains the key for a better understanding of the road through where britpop travels now. That is more than a record, is an artistic declaration. But just enjoy it. It's good, but not the best New Order CD, of course.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some reviews a litle unfair, 18 April 2005
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
Been reading the reviews for this labum here and felt compelled to voice my opinion.
Lets face it, no matter what new order do now, there will always but someone around to say 'they are not what they used to be' etc, but to me this is a good album, with some killer tunes on here, especially the opening track 'who's joe' and 'hey now what you doing'. its true they seem more mainstream than ever, but for a bunch of guys who have been around for over 25 years this is a good, and possibly final, record from them
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And from nowhere, everybody suddenly loves New Order. We Always did love them, though...., 29 Jun 2007
By 
Mr. M. A. Reed (Argleton, GB) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
Godlike Geniuses, the NME tells us. Innovators, schminnovators, blah. Those flavours of the month who hail them as heroes ...this shows them how to do it.

Whereas some turn to the template of the past and rehash old ideas, others always look to something else - . Something new. To the future, which has only just begun. They may be old, and they may be old ideas, but they don't sound old. They still sound like young men with a weight on their shoulders.

It's a New Order record. And it sounds like other New Order records - timeless and timely, of electronics and emotions, of men and machines. Beautiful, yet reservedly British. But no invention, no innovation. Just New Order doing what they do, and doing it well.

To the keen eyed, the signs for their eighth album are not good. Verbosely named, it dispenses with the efficiency of their previous twenty years of recording with bulky, inelegant titles and simplistic one would say crude artwork that appears to make an almost harsh break with their history.

Never judge a record by it's cover. For once you open the box, and press play - or as those who live in the future do, double-click- you'll find appearances deceptive.

"Krafty", the oddly titled lead-off single, is typical New-Order-By-Numbers, but never sounds it. Subterrean bass, vocals both loving and loathing life at the same time, meaningless and meaningful at the same time. The type of song that makes you see that everything in life can be beautiful : child-like, but never childish. Innocent but never naïve.

Repeat this formula (with slight variation) a further ten times, and you have the new album. Unlike many other New Order albums though, there's little in the way of obvious album filler. Almost every song could be a single , bar the final, blundering Beatles-pastiche of "Working Overtime"- the record is a succint, streamlined body of work that is another worthy addition to their body of work.

And yet it's oddly stagnant. For the first time, New Order's reputation may indeed be undeserved. The patent blueprint of "Get Ready" is unchanged ; a heady mix of crunchy guitars and swooping bass and deft electronics - and this is perhaps the record's shortcoming. There's new songs. Just no new ideas.

It's just another New Order record ... and another New Order record is better than many bands entire careers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great, if uneven, summer record, 31 Mar 2005
By 
New Order are an amazing and dynamic band who eschew typical genre conventions. They do dance, they do rock, and they do them both fantastically well... most of the time. They are also inconsistent (listen no further than to Brotherhood, easily their worst album, despite that fact that it contains one of their best-ever singles, Bizarre Love Triangle) which as a fan is both frustrating and endearing: you wish they'd taken a little more time to get it perfect because you know they are absolutely capable of doing so, but at the same time the odd tossed-off lyric or unfinished arrangement add a bit of humanity and warmth to their relatively enigmatic (at least until recently) image.
If Get Ready was the rocking, re-invigorated sound of a phoenix rising from the ashes, Waiting is the sound of the band discovering if they can re-visit their sonic legacy without repeating themselves. For the most part they don't, though first single Krafty, with it's chiming Regret-style guitar, Atmosphere-ic keyboard fills and endearingly terrible lyrics, is a total retread (not, I must admit, that I really mind: no can do New Order like New Order). Indeed, it's the often bad lyrics that prevents this record from earning a fifth star, especially the first couple of songs whose lyrics are pretty much interchangeable and don't really enhance the music.
When things gel, however, look out: gorgeous, melodic, and filled with elegiac longing, the title track is a winner, and instant-turn-it-up-classic Turn is anthemic and more satisfying than anything on Get Ready. The danchall-ish I Told You So is great, (at least until it abruptly fades off without really reaching a climax) and Guilt is a Useless Emotion finds the group in full-on disco mode and sounds fantastic (producer Stuart Price is a perfect match for the band - can we please get some Thin White Duke remixes happening on the single releases, please?)
Overall, the album is highly polished in all the right places, and although it doesn't achieve a satsfying overall cohesion, it's well-sequenced and flows wonderfully. A minor complaint: I would have put the fine Dracula's Castle second last where it would be a better fit - it's a great marriage of rock and electronics and really sums up the album's goals nicely, plus it would be a better lead-in to album closer Working Overtime, which, though a punky departure for the group, works surprisingly well.
Pick it up - this is a great summer pop record, never a bad thing, and overall a nice addition to the New Order oeuvre.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SOUNDS LIKE NEW ORDER!!!, 29 Mar 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
An awesome return to form. Although Republic and Get Ready were not bad albums- this is the one we've all been waiting for. Barney has certainly come into his own with excellent back up from Hooky and Steve. Vocals are probably his strongest yet and everysong a winner. Shades of Power,Corruption, Low-Life and Technique what more could you want. In light of past songs there are some instant classics here already. The title track and Turn are in the same league as True Faith, a bold claim but repeating listening lets them shine through. Above all it sounds like New Order, pop music at it's best. This lot by rights should have been bigger then U2.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Woohoo! They're back!, 27 Mar 2005
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
Managed to get my hands on a copy after begging, borrowing & (almost) stealing! They're in fine form! I've been a devotee since first hearing Joy Division in 1981 and yes, I own EVERYthing they've ever released including some extremely rare Japanese & Belgian bootlegs. I must admit having some misgivings when I first pressed play but after one listen I was having 80's flashbacks & reliving some halcyon days. Shades of Electronic here & there but for the most part I'd have to say it's Low_Life meets Republic with a swizzle of Get The Message thrown in. LOVE IT! Welcome back lads!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Money well spent., 30 Mar 2005
This review is from: Waiting For The Sirens' Call (Audio CD)
I knew from the moment I heard "KRAFTY" being played on the radio I had to get my order in for the album, and I have not been disappointed. WAITING FOR THE SIRENS' CALL is just fantastic. From the first track to the last I have been hooked, and have not disliked any of the tracks. To me, this album is going to be like "Republic" in that the more I play it the more I like it. Obviously as a New Order fan I would have bought the album anyway, but isn't it always a bonus when you think it has been money well spent.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Waiting For The Sirens' Call
Waiting For The Sirens' Call by New Order (Audio CD - 2005)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews