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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 13 October 2005
This is a very funny comedy, revolving around the disasterous unfortunate family who own a hotel. You could say it is like a much darker version of faulty towers. If you are a fan of Korean cinema, you will laugh out loud as I did at every single line Choi Min Sik(Oldboy) delivers as a bumbling dimwit, and at Kang Ho Song's(Symapthy for Mr vengeance) daft actions as the Mischevious older brother. It's very rare to see usually very serious actors playing such idiots so well. This film truly shows off their acting skills.
The family interacts so well that it is easy to believe that they could be related, and not a single character did not make me laugh. The amusing situations, bizarre conversations and comical turn of events.
What makes this film so funny is that its so unique. We don't get this kind of comedy here in the West except in sitcoms, and that is still miles apart.
Director Kim Jee Woon went on to direct A Tale of Two Sisters and A bittersweet Life, two amazing films. So you can see here his dark nature of filmmaking is present even in comedy. I never knew murder could be so funny.
Overall, this film has a great story, brilliant cast and a great soundtrack. Buy it and watch again and again!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 November 2007
Don't listen to the extremely negative review by Ian Stewart. This film is very funny, very strange (in a good way), and most of all good fun. The cast are superb, Choi Min-Sik (Oldboy) and Song Kang-Ho (Memories of Murder) are two of my favourit Korean actors. I like this film a lot..... Give it a go, it's great!!!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The Quiet Family was a huge box office smash is Korea and Takashi Miike's musical remake, The Happiness Of The Katakuris, was a global success but both flicks can be enjoyed for different reasons. Kim Ji Woon's original version is a very dark, black comedy full of mishaps that threaten to destroy the hopes and dreams of a dysfunctional family recently moved into a lodge in the mountains hoping to make a fortune by renting guest rooms to the public. When the first guest arrives and kills himself all the family are scared of the negative publicity it will bring, so they decide to cover it all up and bury the body. This starts a bizarre chain of events that brings a lot of belly chuckles along the way. In one scene, Kang Ho-Song (who went on to star in JSA and Thirst, to name a few) bravely defends his sister from a would be rapist but ends up receiving a sweet kicking for his heroics. Choi Min Sik is a million miles away from his persona in Oldboy and Crying Fist, as the slow witted uncle, but proves he's not one for being typecast. But for me, the idiosyncratic parents steal the show with their poor decision making that sets a bad example for the rest of the family who inevitably follow their lead, ergo the more holes they dig the bigger the hole gets for themselves. The intelligent level of humour on display has been skillfully orchestrated and captured masterfully on the facial expessions of all the cast who believe there actions to be correct, and to some extent justified, when clearly they are not. I enjoyed Miike's mad musical remake but this dark version with sandpaper dry humour was even more hilarious, without needing to include all the song and dance.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
One of the worst things that can happen to a hotel is for someone to die there. But what if the deaths, suicides and possible murders just won't stop?

That's the dilemma facing the titular "Quiet Family," in a Korean dark comedy that gives new meaning to the phrase "sick sense of humour." While the movie starts off in a relatively relaxed, normal manner, Kim Ji-woon's first movie becomes more warped and frenetic as the death-count rises, and the deliciously complex plot becomes cleverer. You'll never look at a rural bed-and-breakfast in quite the same way again.

The Kang family recently moved from Seoul to a some remote rural area, where Dae Gu (Park In-hwa) has purchased a remote little hotel after being told that a major road is going to be run nearby. But nobody checks in until one rainy night, when a strange man appears -- and then stabs himself on a sharpened keychain. Terrified that the suicide will ruin their reputation, the family (except the two teen daughters) freaks out and buries the body in the woods.

For most people, that would be the end -- except the Kangs seem to be under a sort of curse. More people die in bizarre and gruesome ways, and end up buried in the woods. As if police investigations and road construction weren't causing enough stress, a local businessman makes Dae Gu a party to his own little plot -- he's going to order a hit on his sister. When THAT goes wrong, can the Quiet Family pull it together -- or will everything blow up in their faces?

Takashi Miike later remade this movie as the surreal musical "The Happiness of the Katakuris." But don't let that colour any opinions of the original film, because Miike's work is very different from "The Quiet Family."

This movie starts off pretty tamely, with the Kang family's problems getting any guests into their hotel. In fact, it's a bit dull watching them potter around the place, hoping that incoming phone calls will be for something other than Chinese food orders. But after the second round of suicides -- and the discovery that one about-to-be-buried corpse isn't quite dead -- the storyline starts to blossom. As the family's subterfuge spins out of control, the plot becomes more complex, more chaotic, and much weirder.

By the time the entire hit-man-on-the-premises subplot enters the scene, the entire family is spinning out of control -- literally nothing is going to go right for them. And the crazier it gets, the more hilarious it is. By the climax this little family has taken hostages, set fires, peeped in on couples having sex, buried a small crowd out in the woods, and a couple of them have chased ex-guests with axes and shovels... but with no ill intent.

The only really disturbing scene is one where Mina almost gets raped by one of the guests, only to be rescued by her bumbling brother in what is possibly the most pathetic fight scene ever, followed by a very undignified demise involving a clifftop and a swinging door.

But Kim Ji-Woon's greatest triumph is something most directors can't do -- subtle sick humor. Consider the bloody rapist lurching through the inn like a serial killer, or the gloriously gruesome spectacle of a mostly-dead, semi-nude man lunging around and roaring like a zombie... only to get whacked in the head with a shovel. The increasingly loopy, desensitized reactions to the deaths are simply sidesplitting, and it leaves you wondering if the Kangs will be found out.

Park In-hwa does an excellent job as the patriarch of this little clan, who appears to have severely stunted morals, while Na Moon-hee is good as his long-suffering wife. Song Kang Ho as the not-so-bright son and Lee Yun Sung as the flirtatious younger daughter are also excellent, but the cleverer, somewhat sarcastic Go Ho Kyun is the real standout among the assorted kids.

"The Quiet Family" is a deceptively peaceful title for a frenetic, hilariously sick little dark comedy. It may start slow, but as the bodies pile up, so does the humor.
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2 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 26 September 2006
Has anyone seen Happiness of the Katakuris? (one of my favourite films)

From what I gather of reviews these 2 films seem to be very similar in nature and was just wondering if anyone had seen them both
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