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80 of 85 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Reformation saint
Luther is a remarkable film in many ways. One disclaimer should be made -- this is not a documentary, in which the standard phrase about scenes being created or adapted for dramatic purposes would be made. No such disclaimer is given here, but the serious observer watching for history as well as entertainment should be warned not to accept everything at face value...
Published on 6 Jan 2006 by Kurt Messick

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uninspiring but ultimately rewarding
Eric Till's Luther starts badly - very badly - with a rushed prologue that felt like a bad TV miniseries (I was waiting for the voice-over: "Previously on Luther") and requires the audience's patience for the first 20 minutes or so. Till is a supremely visually unimaginative director - were it not for captions and corruption, you wouldn't know when you were in Rome or...
Published on 15 Nov 2005 by Trevor Willsmer


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80 of 85 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Reformation saint, 6 Jan 2006
By 
Kurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (London, SW1) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Luther [DVD] (DVD)
Luther is a remarkable film in many ways. One disclaimer should be made -- this is not a documentary, in which the standard phrase about scenes being created or adapted for dramatic purposes would be made. No such disclaimer is given here, but the serious observer watching for history as well as entertainment should be warned not to accept everything at face value.
The performances are solid, occasionally stunning. Joseph Fiennes (Shakespeare in 'Shakespeare in Love') does an exceptional job portraying Germany's turbulent priest, whose search for knowledge and personal salvation leads him to question all around him. The action moves quickly in the film, collapsing complex historical and theological items into almost single-issue ciphers for clarity in the film -- one might be forgiven for coming away from the film believing that Luther tacked up a declaration of 1 Thesis rather than 95 Theses, and that the Roman church was corrupt entirely. The tension within the church is alluded to in a few spots (the cardinal who hopes for a pope who will save the church, etc.), but by and large, the Roman church is portrayed with a broad brush as evil.
The scenes in which the peasants revolt and the people take Luther's messages to extremes are dramatically produced and emotionally moving without being gruesome or needlessly gory. The complexities of the people's wavering support for Luther, and Luther's occasional collaborations against the people, are similarly glossed over.
Fiennes is shown in a few points preaching to the people, as a priest and as a street leader -- Luther was known to be an effective preacher and teacher, and this comes across here. Luther's time as a professor of theology is, like much of the story, collapsed into a brief series of scenes, again simplifying the complexity of faculty and academic dealings into a few figures either supporting or worrying about the controversy being stirred.
The historical progession is kept fairly accurate, going from early days in ministry and schooling to early awakenings in the light of his travels and teaching, to the Diet of Worms and the final climax of the film taking place in Augsburg, showing the recitation (and assuming the victory) of the Augsburg Confession, a document still recited to this day.
Sir Peter Ustinov steals every scene he appears in, as Philip the Wise, an almost bumbling and good-hearted soul, who is probably the most ahistorical figure in the film. Luther's primary sponsors were neither bumbling nor innocent, but rather political animals of the first rank, and to a certain extent, the political side of the Reformation owed as much to military and economic freedom from Roman overlordship and the fracturing of Germanic unity with the slow and steady downfall of what remained of the Holy Roman Empire. This tension is hinted at in the film, particularly in the post-script, but is really secondary to the primary point of the film.
Claire Cox portrays Katerina von Borg, the run-away nun who became Luther's wife. Her role is virtually non-existent through most of the film, and save pressuring Luther into deciding to take a wife, she seems to have little role in Luther's political or theological development, which is likewise not true to history. Another key character, Johann Tetzel, the man whose preaching specifically prompted Luther's writing of the 95 Theses, (portrayed by Alfred Molina), is presented as a very one-dimensional and corrupt character only interested in selling indulgences, which is rather far from the truth of Tetzel, also.
Despite these drawbacks (understandable, given that in two hours, writers and directors have to be selective in choosing material), there are occasionals glimpses of the fascinating history surrounding church and society during Luther's time -- for instance, the fact that not only were scriptures removed from access to the laity, they were in fact rarely read by the clergy. The character of Luther specifically says that he relies on scripture AND reason (something the sola scriptura crowd tend to forget). The real threat to Christendom from the newly-expanding Muslims lingers in the background (the city of Constantinople, whose walls had been unbreached for a thousand years, had fallen just a few decades prior, and the idea of yet another Crusade against the Muslims was being seriously considered).
This film presents a sympathetic figure in Luther, one that the church would have done well to retain rather than cast out -- but then, churches have a tendency to cast out for authoritarian/hierarchical/institutional reasons those they ought to embrace on theological and pastoral grounds. Luther's darker side is only hinted at -- the character says at one point that he is a divisive figure, and this remains true until the end of his life, and even Lutheranism split from other Reformers, and even among itself, as many Lutheran followers modified official Lutheranism into something Luther himself probably would not have been able to accept.
In history, Luther gets portrayed with a broad brush as a bold reformer, taking on the powers that be to lead the Western world into an era of Reformation (prompting, not to long after, the Counter-Reformation in the Roman church). In this film, with sensitivity and compassion, Luther is portrayed without too many dimensions (his anti-Judaic stance, for instance, is never even hinted at in the film) but with an aim toward presenting the point -- that it is sometimes worth taking a stand of faith and reason against seemingly incalculable odds.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mover and Shaker, 4 July 2012
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Luther [DVD] (DVD)
This is a review of the German edition of the DVD. It is the same film (in English) but with different extras. Whether one is religious or not, Catholic or Protestant, one cannot deny that Luther was one of the world's great movers and shakers, in that the repercussions of his actions still strongly resonate in today's world.

When the opening credits revealed that it had been co-produced by a Lutheran financial institution, I was quite wary of the movie possessing possibly a too-heavy religious feel. After all, the story is of a religious figure. I have no formal religious drum to beat, thus I view the film qua film, but such a subject as Luther in itself cannot fail to present an agenda. (In an interview that appears as an extra on my DVD, director Eric Till points out that his film is not for theologians; if it was then it would never have been made as they would still be disagreeing over various aspects.)

So, thankfully, my initial fears were misplaced, since the film takes a predominantly secular and historical perspective as it tells Luther's story. Here we have a preacher battling with himself as well as with the religious hierarchy. This was also a time when religious doctrine had stark political influences. The film cannot help but show the worlds of religion and politics clashing. But it's not helped by the holy soundtrack composed by Richard Harvey.

The film's historical outline is broadly true. It commences in Erfurt in 1507 with the young Luther's holding his first mass. It is an embarrassing moment for all concerned. This is followed by his life-changing trip to Rome. And here we come across one of the historically problematical issues of the film, for the one scene follows upon the other, giving the impression that only a short time separated them when really it was three years.

Another instance of this telescoping effect is Luther's marriage following the death of Pope Leo X; the first happened in 1525, the latter four years earlier. The film ends with the Diet of Augsburg in 1530, where many German princes defy Emperor Charles V.

There are some omissions, such as the burning of Tetzel's counter-theses or of the debate with Eck, but this latter admittedly would only repeat what we already knew. There is no evidence that Frederick of Saxony and Luther ever met, but they do - briefly - in this film. But, as Peter Ustinov points out in his interview, there is equally no evidence that they did not, and their geographical proximity must have given them opportunities. On a separate note, interestingly, the filmed interiors of the churches look almost Lutheran already!

Filmed in Germany, the Czech Republic and Italy, it has high production values and a strong star cast. Joseph Fiennes is Luther; Alfred Molina is Johann Tetzel, the highly-successful Dominican seller of papal indulgences; Peter Ustinov is Prince Frederick of Saxony; Bruno Ganz plays Luther's immediate superior and spiritual guide; Jonathan Firth (Colin's younger brother) is the papal nuncio; whilst Pope Leo X himself is played by Uwe Ochsenknecht.

The extras on my German DVD feature some German-language-only items. However, there are also interviews in English with the director and stars, as well as an unnarrated six-minute behind-the-scenes look at the set, rehearsals, filming, CGI, clothing the extras, and make-up.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great film, 29 Jan 2005
By 
Kurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (London, SW1) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Luther is a remarkable film in many ways. One disclaimer should be made -- this is not a documentary, in which the standard phrase about scenes being created or adapted for dramatic purposes would be made. No such disclaimer is given here, but the serious observer watching for history as well as entertainment should be warned not to accept everything at face value.
The performances are solid, occasionally stunning. Joseph Fiennes (Shakespeare in 'Shakespeare in Love') does an exceptional job portraying Germany's turbulent priest, whose search for knowledge and personal salvation leads him to question all around him. The action moves quickly in the film, collapsing complex historical and theological items into almost single-issue ciphers for clarity in the film -- one might be forgiven for coming away from the film believing that Luther tacked up a declaration of 1 Thesis rather than 95 Theses, and that the Roman church was corrupt entirely. The tension within the church is alluded to in a few spots (the cardinal who hopes for a pope who will save the church, etc.), but by and large, the Roman church is portrayed with a broad brush as evil.
The scenes in which the peasants revolt and the people take Luther's messages to extremes are dramatically produced and emotionally moving without being gruesome or needlessly gory. The complexities of the people's wavering support for Luther, and Luther's occasional collaborations against the people, are similarly glossed over.
Fiennes is shown in a few points preaching to the people, as a priest and as a street leader -- Luther was known to be an effective preacher and teacher, and this comes across here. Luther's time as a professor of theology is, like much of the story, collapsed into a brief series of scenes, again simplifying the complexity of faculty and academic dealings into a few figures either supporting or worrying about the controversy being stirred.
The historical progession is kept fairly accurate, going from early days in ministry and schooling to early awakenings in the light of his travels and teaching, to the Diet of Worms and the final climax of the film taking place in Augsburg, showing the recitation (and assuming the victory) of the Augsburg Confession, a document still recited to this day.
Sir Peter Ustinov steals every scene he appears in, as Philip the Wise, an almost bumbling and good-hearted soul, who is probably the most ahistorical figure in the film. Luther's primary sponsors were neither bumbling nor innocent, but rather political animals of the first rank, and to a certain extent, the political side of the Reformation owed as much to military and economic freedom from Roman overlordship and the fracturing of Germanic unity with the slow and steady downfall of what remained of the Holy Roman Empire. This tension is hinted at in the film, particularly in the post-script, but is really secondary to the primary point of the film.
Claire Cox portrays Katerina von Borg, the run-away nun who became Luther's wife. Her role is virtually non-existent through most of the film, and save pressuring Luther into deciding to take a wife, she seems to have little role in Luther's political or theological development, which is likewise not true to history. Another key character, Johann Tetzel, the man whose preaching specifically prompted Luther's writing of the 95 Theses, (portrayed by Alfred Molina), is presented as a very one-dimensional and corrupt character only interested in selling indulgences, which is rather far from the truth of Tetzel, also.
Despite these drawbacks (understandable, given that in two hours, writers and directors have to be selective in choosing material), there are occasionals glimpses of the fascinating history surrounding church and society during Luther's time -- for instance, the fact that not only were scriptures removed from access to the laity, they were in fact rarely read by the clergy. The character of Luther specifically says that he relies on scripture AND reason (something the sola scriptura crowd tend to forget). The real threat to Christendom from the newly-expanding Muslims lingers in the background (the city of Constantinople, whose walls had been unbreached for a thousand years, had fallen just a few decades prior, and the idea of yet another Crusade against the Muslims was being seriously considered).
This film presents a sympathetic figure in Luther, one that the church would have done well to retain rather than cast out -- but then, churches have a tendency to cast out for authoritarian/hierarchical/institutional reasons those they ought to embrace on theological and pastoral grounds. Luther's darker side is only hinted at -- the character says at one point that he is a divisive figure, and this remains true until the end of his life, and even Lutheranism split from other Reformers, and even among itself, as many Lutheran followers modified official Lutheranism into something Luther himself probably would not have been able to accept.
In history, Luther gets portrayed with a broad brush as a bold reformer, taking on the powers that be to lead the Western world into an era of Reformation (prompting, not to long after, the Counter-Reformation in the Roman church). In this film, with sensitivity and compassion, Luther is portrayed without too many dimensions (his anti-Judaic stance, for instance, is never even hinted at in the film) but with an aim toward presenting the point -- that it is sometimes worth taking a stand of faith and reason against seemingly incalculable odds.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good retelling of Luther's life, 9 Oct 2005
By 
Paul (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Luther [DVD] (DVD)
Overall an excellent film. Fiennes is extremely believable as Luther, the highlight being his first sermon - if only all churches preached like that! The nature of the Roman Catholic church in the middle ages is also excellent - showing simply and clearly how far they deviated from scripture and God's plan for the church - the church today is still recovering from that.
The only reason this has got 4 and not 5 stars is the ending - it ends too abrubtly without giving any expose on his later years.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uninspiring but ultimately rewarding, 15 Nov 2005
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Luther [DVD] (DVD)
Eric Till's Luther starts badly - very badly - with a rushed prologue that felt like a bad TV miniseries (I was waiting for the voice-over: "Previously on Luther") and requires the audience's patience for the first 20 minutes or so. Till is a supremely visually unimaginative director - were it not for captions and corruption, you wouldn't know when you were in Rome or Wurtenburg and he unforgiveably makes Luther nailing his declaration on the door look like someone hurriedly putting up a shelf before making a run for the post office - and he isn't exactly helped by a script that can't be said to give John Osborne a run for his money, but ultimately it's such a good yarn that it defies the telling and picks up its own momentum. Of course, that's sometimes at the expense of some of Luther's less P.C. views - at times you definitely get the feeling that this is made by Lutherans, for Lutherans.

Joseph Fiennes' performance as the turbulent priest similarly improves with the dialogue and the drama (it's hard to muck up "Here I stand: I can do no other," and thankfully he doesn't) but the international cast is variable at best, although Peter Ustinov has fun as Frederick the Wise and Alfred Molina offers a nice line in selling Papal indulgences as the infamous Johann Tetsel. It is strange, though, that the more English-language films he makes, the worse Bruno Ganz's English seems to become. There's no shortage of cliches (crippled child ahoy!) and the ending feels as rushed as the beginning, but it's ultimately a surprisingly watchable slice of history.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Packed with important Christian history, 3 Mar 2005
As religious biographies set to film go, "Luther" is among the best. Few serious directors have taken on the topic of Christian history since "The Ten Commandments." After the movie better informed about Martin Luther and the Reformation.
Although important parts of Luther's life, positions and views are glazed over or ignored, it serves to incite curiosity about his 95 Theses and the Augsburg Confession.
The difficulty with a film portrayal of one of Christian history's more influential figures is that the historical Martin Luther could not be captured into a couple of hours. It is just a movie, and is not supposed to address complex eternal questions.
Protestant Christians will bristle at the brief look at Luther's theology, and the emphasis on the politics. What else could a filmmaker do? Already, such a film was destined for a short life in the theaters, and the fact is true: much of the issues surrounding Luther stemmed from his reaction to politics.
Roman Catholics might be upset by the anti-Catholic slant. I do not think the film was meant to put Catholicism in a bad light as much as it was meant to show what events and concerns caused Luther to react. The movie was aptly titled "Luther" and not "The Beginning of the Reformation" or "The Great Religious Revolt."
Indulgences have never been one of Catholicism's honorable or defensible provisions. There is no telling of Luther's story without examining the abuses of men looking to profit from the fear and guilt of illiterate believers. A modern Catholic will rightly note that personal Scripture among the laity is now encouraged by Rome, and be frustrated as he acknowledges indulgences are still part of the present Catholic theology.
Lutherans will find the movie intriguing, realizing Luther's battle against Rome begot their own denomination. Coming back to the origin of the Lutheran faith will be exciting and educational.
Joseph Fiennes is believable, albeit a little wooden. His Luther will remind viewers of Jeremy Irons' character in "The Mission." He is noble, calm and steadfast. Like Irons' priest, Luther faces great adversity through his desire to follow Jesus Christ.
Luther comes across as a noble would-be martyr. He shows godly courage, and a few levels of depth. What is not shown are his own imperfections and inconsistencies. If this is all you know about Martin Luther, then you only know one small, if not important, side of him. Like St. Peter, like Deitrch Bonhoeffer, Luther had clear imperfections, yet he still stoof up for his beliefs.
When Luther writhes in angst against temptation and evil, he speaks angrily to Satan as would anyone to his most cursed enemy. Like C. S. Lewis' Wormwood in "The Screwtape Letters," we can taste the insidious, pervasive nature of Satan. The spiritual conflict endured by Luther is not the glamorized head-spinning of "The Exorcist," but shows that he was not merely fighting flesh and blood entities through academic arguments.
My recommendation of "Luther" is 100%. Sunday school, CCD and high school groups could watch it as fodder for discussion. This isn't for the "Adventures In Odyssey" or "Veggie Tales" crowd. My small group watched it, and discussed it comparing it with what we understood of Scripture. Could we stand as Luther stood for the defense of God's Word?
A solid companion to the movie is "Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther" by Roland Herbert Bainton. It is an excellent addition to church video libraries.
Anthony Trendl
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "God is all about love, he is within you", 17 Mar 2005
Luther should probably be forgiven for all its shortcomings as there's no doubt that the movie smacks of sincerity and earnestness, but nothing can escape the fact that the film is such a convoluted mish-mash of history and theatrics, that most viewers will either walk away having endured two hours of ponderous boredom, or are scratching their heads in wonderment at what it was all about. For about the first hour the film is pretty involving, as we witness Luther's journey from secluded, nave monk to world-weary man of letters, who demonizes the corrupt Catholic Church at every turn, and becomes a martyr for the poor and downtrodden.
But things go steadily downhill from there, as the movie descends into a series of stultifying dull set pieces, with lots of men running around in gaudy and flashy red dresses - It all begins to look like giant drag for the religiously inclined set. The film begins with Luther's (Joseph Fiennes) famous thunderstorm vow to enter a monastery, and quickly cuts to his wavering celebration of a first mass. His assignment to a theological chair at the University of Wittenberg is also briefly shown. Things appear to be going well for him, but when his proselytizing begins to anger the local clergy, and when word gets to Rome that his sermons are contradicting the Churches teachings, he is given a sharp and vitriolic warning to "not bite the hand that feeds him."
Luther continues to be revolted by the blatant exploitation he sees around him, and is particularly incensed at the false preaching of the Dominican Tetzel (Alfred Molina, complete with cockney accent!). This disgust at the way the Church is unashamedly taking advantage of the poor and uneducated, forces Luther to post his famous 95 Theses. Luther tries to retain a respectful attitude toward the papacy, while standing steadfast in his beliefs of religious reformation. The heart of his grievances is the notion of indulgences: by paying the Church, you can absolve yourself or your relatives of their sins. Luther is incensed that the Catholic Church would demand money from people that don't have it, measure virtue by the coin, and basically allow the poor to buy salvation through fear.
Much of the dramatic emphasis involves a series of machinations at Rome as a machiavellian and deceitful Leo X, (Uwe Ochsenknecht), a distinguished but overmatched Cardinal Cajetan (Mathieu Carriere), the power hungry Emperor Charles V (Torben Liebrecht), and Jonathan Firth as the ambitious, rigid papal legate Aleander, try to outfox Luther and brand him as a heretic. His only saving grace is sympathetic and kindly Prince of Saxony (a dithery Sir Peter Ustinov), who acts as Luther's religious conscience and protector. The story also touches on Luther's marriage to Katerina von Bora (Claire Cox) - a relationship that is totally glossed over and subjugated - and his final presentation of the German translation of the Bible to Prince Frederick.
Throughout, we witness Luther as a kind of strange quasi-activist for radical social change, sensitive to the plight of the poor, but also willing to unapologetically splay himself at the foot of God, begging to be forgiven for his sins at every turn. Fiennes as Luther does an adequate enough job with the material. But his overly embellished style often comes across as over-acted and trite. The film also makes fine use of various European locations, and adequately evokes the realities of Luther's world, particularly the peasant's revolt where thousands of the poor were slaughtered. However, the major difficulty with this movie is keeping the narrative clear and concise. All too often Luther sacrifices dramatic harmony in its effort to stick to the facts, resulting in a film that starts out quite well, but becomes hopelessly muddled and awfully ponderous by the end. Mike Leonard March 05.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Luther the young rebel., 25 Mar 2010
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This is one of the best historical dramas that I have seen in many a long year. It is almost as fine a film as "A Man for All Seasons". The hero here is the man that the great Catholic statesman Thomas More detested so much; the founder of the Protestant movement, Martin Luther.

The film opens with Luther, weeping with terror at finding himself exposed to a thunderstorm whilst traveling alone at night in the midst of the countryside, beseeching the aid of St Anne and promising, in return, to become a monk. This he does, to the disgust of his father, who had scraped and borrowed money to get his son educated as a lawyer. Luther, obsessed with his own human failings and his all-enveloping sense of sin, feels that he cannot ever do enough to rid himself of his self-disgust and merit the forgiveness of God. Sent to Rome as an emissary of his monastic order Luther is horrified to discover that Rome, the city of the Pope, is rife with corruption and that some of the most corrupt persons there are the leaders of his Church.

The rot sets in. He begins to doubt. Luther is sent off by the head of his monastery to study and become a Church divine. The hope is that his doubts will be stilled. His studies though make even more doubts arise in his mind -- then he encounters the practice of the sale of indulgences - said indulgences being hawked by a venal and arrogant officer of the Church. Luther cannot take any more of this; writes up his 95 theses and nails them to the door of the cathedral in Wittenberg, for all who can read to see --- The revolt begins -- and spreads.

The film does not back away from showing how Luther's call for reform was taken up and altered, to suit their own ends, by a number of thinkers and would-be leaders who sought to out-Luther Martin Luther and preached a vision of reform that could not and would not be realised without violence and mayhem. Nor does it seek to hide the fact that Luther, appalled by what has done in his name, called for violence to be inflicted upon the violent - if they did not follow him - thus beginning the wars of religion that wracked Europe for generations to come. The film sets are magnificent, wonderfully colourful and the costumes worn by the actors are extraordinarily accurate. (I studied the period for my degree - I was amazed to see the costumes that I had seen in reproductions of paintings and woodcuts there on the screen before me.) Joseph Fiennes is an impressive and utterly credible young Luther, heading up a cast of impressive stature, all of whom acquit themselves well.

It was a pleasure to see the late Sir Peter Ustinov in the role of the Elector Frederick. He is only present in a few scenes but steals each and every one that he plays a part in. The special features are, alas, not up to much. There are a few very bitty interviews with the chief players and the heads of the production team that made the film, but these are short and very badly edited. Some of them actually start part of the way through a spoken sentence. Still, all in all, a very good and entertaining film ;two hours slipped by quickly and enjoyably. Given that and the price Amazon is charging for the DVD at the moment I would class this as a bargain of a DVD that should not be allowed to slip through anyone's fingers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love it, 12 July 2014
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Love it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 2 July 2014
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excellent film...
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