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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A gripping, exciting and great sequel!
The Bourne Identity was a good film - The Bourne Supremacy is even better!
The story picks up in Goa, India, where Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is having an almost idyllic life with his girlfriend Marie (Franka Potente) who he met whilst escaping from his past life as a government assassin across Europe in the first film. Bourne is still trying to remember who he was/is...
Published on 7 Feb. 2005 by Ms. N. T. Scott

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not as good as the Original but sequels rarely are !
The first film in the Series blew me away with a superb script and great acting.The sequel is still engaging but not a patch on the Original.The storyline isn't great and the chase scenes appear deliberately confusing so Bourne always gets away without the viewer knowing quite how.It's still worth watching and i'll defintely watch the last film in the trilogy.I played my...
Published on 29 Aug. 2010 by s


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A gripping, exciting and great sequel!, 7 Feb. 2005
By 
Ms. N. T. Scott (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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The Bourne Identity was a good film - The Bourne Supremacy is even better!
The story picks up in Goa, India, where Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is having an almost idyllic life with his girlfriend Marie (Franka Potente) who he met whilst escaping from his past life as a government assassin across Europe in the first film. Bourne is still trying to remember who he was/is and always remains on alert to the possibility that his past will eventually catch up with him. Meanwhile, the CIA is on his case about a double murder involving two of their agents, which in turn leads to Bourne returning to Europe to try to uncover the truth about his past role as a high level assassin.
Once again, Matt Damon is totally convincing as Bourne and from his portrayal the viewer can empathise with his desperation, frustration and anger with not knowing who he was and why he cannot ever live a normal life until his questions are answered. The supporting cast (Julia Stiles, Franka Potente, Brian Cox) are all good. However, it is Joan Allen who particularly stands out as Deputy of the CIA tracking Bourne down.
This really is an excellent spy thriller, with plenty of high quality car chases and escapes included too. The storyline is believeable within the context of the world of global espionage, bar the weaker part of the plot involving Abbott (Cox). Nevertheless, the film moves at a great pace and nicley sets up the third installment, The Bourne Ulitimatum.
Based upon The Bourne Supremacy, I eagerly await the next sequel in this thrilling saga.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Action Thriller, 8 April 2010
By 
Mr. Ross Maynard (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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"The Bourne Supremacy" is not quite as good as the other two in the series in my view. It lacks the narrative strength of the first film (the best of the series) and it lacks the visceral action (and clever storyline) of the third film - except perhaps in the final car chase. "The Bourne Supremacy" has a fairly simple structure and is essentially a fast-paced chase movie - find Marie's killer. Nevertheless, it is very tense and enjoyable. I had to watch it twice to get the story (someone's stolen money from the CIA and Bourne is framed to distract attention from the real perpetrator), so you need to pay attention throughout. My only complaint is that Bourne (who is described in the first film as "invisible") is so easy to spot: he makes no attempt to disguise his appearance or even wear a hat. Consequently, he ends up getting chased several times after being spotted on the street or on CCTV. However, as thrillers go this is really good - it's just that the other two films in the series are even better !. You do need to watch the first film to get to know the characters before watching this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More of the Same in 'Episode #2' of a Great Trilogy, BUT Blu-ray Does Not Improve the Video/Audio over an Upscaled DVD, 17 Oct. 2011
'The Bourne Supremacy' is the second, and second best after the debut 'The Bourne Identity', of a trilogy of films ('The Bourne Ultimatum' follows- and the list may expand in the future...) based on the 'Bourne' series of novels by Robert Ludlum, with Matt Damon in the lead role as the CIA operative Jason Bourne. This sequel film dates back to 2004 and maintained the thrilling, more 'gritty' style of action content which debuted in 'Identity' with a no-nonsense, ruthless, approach to the action whilst maintaining a credible plot - all supported by quality production values.

As opposed to 'Identity', the move to Blu-ray for this film (and the next) is far less notable, with the image/audio barely noticeably better than an upscaled DVD (despite an 'upgrade' to DTS); the only real improvement is with the additional extras, to support the fact that by this time all 3 films had been made.

This film starts a couple of years after Jason Bourne has been 'liberated', but he remains haunted by his past and suspicious of external 'intervention' - and rightly so, as the two-stranded storyline involves him responding to being framed for a murder during a CIA operation (to expose a suspected agent who is siphoning off funds) and the related new CIA management who take a serious interest into the background of Bourne and his CIA 'history'.....

The truly notable aspect of this second film of the trilogy is that it is, like the follow-on, directed by Paul Greengrass - someone who was always admired but had not really hit the 'big time'. Exposure courtesy of 'Supremacy' propelled him to the cinematic forefront, where he has stayed with other movies such as the marvellous 'United 93'. Having said all that, I still prefer the debut 'Identity'; Greengrass did not damage the Bourne legacy with 'Supremacy' or 'Ultimatum', but the first film obviously started the Bourne ball-rolling and so is more 'refreshing', plus it is less 'busy' than the remaining 2 films and is supported by a more adventurous musical soundtrack. I can't say if Greengrass has a particular style which one should notice in his movies, but if nothing else he certainly applies a distinctive 'hue', with a distinctive overall colour-tone of blue to the video of 'Supremacy' and green to 'Ultimatum'. Both also marked a move to being filmed handheld, which I presume is one of the reasons why the overall appearance is more 'natural' and certainly (to my eyes at least) more grainy and less affected by a jump to HD presentation than 'Identity'....

So, knowing the Bourne 'background' and the basics of the plot it's pretty much 'as you were' as the film rattles along with the same list of ingredients as 'Identity'; but there is one big difference in how Bourne operates now, the details and reasons for which I shan't divulge to avoid spoiling things for first-time viewers. Thankfully, despite there being little new in terms of innovation those Bourne basics are quite sufficient to entertain and engross: car chase-tick, brutal hand-to-hand fight-tick, covert surveillance-tick, escaping from improbable situations-tick.

This aspect is in my opinion so noticeable that I don't recommend you watch 'Supremacy' very soon after 'Identity', because although you might want to learn more of the Bourne story there can be a sense of 'deja vu' as far as the basic action is concerned....

The screenplay does seem to be a bit more cliche-ridden than 'Identity' and, since we know by now that Bourne rarely fails, events are a little predictable but that doesn't detract from the action being above the norm in terms of quality. Having said that, it's nice to see that in this film Bourne relying on a rolled-up magazine as his main weapon when fighting, instead of grabbing a biro from a nearby desk again as he did in 'Identity' ! The 'bland' nature of the Bourne character continues to lends itself very well to what I think is the rather bland acting nature of Damon, although he is now more sure-footed, less confused and on the whole more brutal (for understandable reasons which will become clear when you see the film). The difference this time is Damon has to portray an overall sense of guilt, sprinkled with a generous helping of confusion - which he again manages very well.

This Bourne film continues the refreshing aspect of the action being located on a global scale, which despite opening in India soon returns to European soil with a heavy emphasis towards the east, especially Berlin and Moscow. The excellent range of supporting actors is also maintained, but this time more reliance is made on a smaller core of them which now includes the highly competent and convincing Joan Allen as well as the always excellent Brian Cox. Everyone else (with one exception who, again, I won't mention to avoid spoiling things) is pretty nameless and invariably don't last long until they bite the dust, often literally !

As mentioned at the start, 'Supremacy' looks no better on Blu-ray than upscaled DVD and, despite benefiting from DTS, doesn't really sound any better either as for the most part the audio is not that spatial, really quite concentrated and reflected perfectly adequately with DD5.1 (which is what the DVD has). Everything remains just as sharp as the DVD but, as mentioned earlier, the Greengrass blue (in this case) 'hue' and filming method do make the overall presentation somewhat murky, which is no fault of Blu-ray. Where Blu-ray does offers an advantage is with the extras, which add several new featurettes to the DVD which continue the Ludlum/Bourne coverage from the first disc. The new 'U-Control' in-film feature also appears again, but when I could get a player which supported it properly (often the picture-in-picture was silent) it again didn't seem to be that notable in content.

So, if you enjoy action movies which also include a bit of intelligence (of both kinds !) 'The Bourne Supremacy' is just as essential to view as 'Identity', but especially so if you have watched the debut feature already of course - but don't watch it to soon after the first film and don't feel pressured to get this film on Blu-ray, as DVD will do just as well due to the difference in the filming method not properly justifying the need for an HD presentation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fine thriller despite terribly misguided direction, 15 Nov. 2005
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
The Bourne Supremacy is one of those films where the cast and the plotting are strong enough to survive some extremely bad direction from Paul Greengrass. Former documentarian Greengrass might be overcompensating for what is in essence a pretty commonplace revenge story, but it seems far more likely that he's inadvertently done his best to sabotage his own movie by over-rationalizing each scene without realising that when they're all put together his mixture of shakeycam incomprehensibility (often in scenes where there is no emotional or narrative need for it), redundant shifts of focus, overediting and overly dark photography just makes him come across as an unimaginative Michael Bay wannabe hack rather than creating an illusion of reality or placing the audience in his amnesiac hero's confused shoes. Indeed, he's giving the audience even LESS information and frequently obscuring the action because he's forgotten that just because HE knows what's going on doesn't mean the audience will. On the plus side, this is much less of a problem on the small screen than the big screen, where motion sickness and whiplash were real possibilities, but it's still disappointing considering that one of the great joys of the original was Doug Liman's old-school direction - it was genuinely refreshing to see action scenes where the director was showing you the scene instead of drawing attention to himself after so many years of MTV incomprehensibility. After the problems on the first film, there was no possibility of Liman returning. It's just a shame they couldn't hire a competent director.

With such a handicap, it's surprising that it works so very well - especially since there are few narrative surprises (you can guess the villain long before a trusting sacrificial lamb gives him a crucial piece of information at the cost of his life simply by scanning out the cast list and looking for the first likely typecast suspect to jump out at you). But then the fun of the first film wasn't what it did, but how it did it, particularly the practical ways Bourne evades and eludes his pursuers: the first car chase exists in a credible milieu, constantly thwarted by traffic jams and crowds. The film even manages to find an environment where Joan Allen's eternal humorlessness actually seems appropriate, and it's a genuine surprise that the film's climax is an emotional scene that effectively damns its hero even as he tries to unburden himself of guilt. Impressive stuff despite the problems.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review, 4 Mar. 2008
The Bourne Supremacy is an exceptional thriller that is a sequel to 2002's The Bourne Identity. With Paul Greengrass taking over as director, The Bourne Supremacy still has a soft spot for traumatized children and interrupted romance, but the movie is structured so differently that it draws power to them rather than giving in to them. The Bourne Supremacy is such a breathless thriller, that amidst a sharp emotional exchange, it manages to sustain its deep feeling across an improbable amount of mayhem and violence. At the beginning of the film, Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) pulls on all of our heartstrings, as he has to cope with the death of his partner, Marie (Franke Potente), performing this brilliantly. There are many unfortunate lapses throughout The Bourne Supremacy for Jason, and this high-paced, realistic movie will keep you hanging on until the very last minute. The end of the film, and the main climax, involves a high speed car chase through the city of Moscow. This film is a fantastic sequel, and it's guaranteed that you will want to watch this again and again and never get tired of it. Well done Paul Greengrass. A success? Certainly.

Hannah Foote, aged 14.
5 stars.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The 'Law of Diminishing Returns'? Never heard of it., 17 Nov. 2005
This review is from: The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
There's a reason the Bourne movies are attracting comparisons to the Bond movies though what seems to interest people more are the differences. As the bloated Bond films give you an oily Hally Berry, Lazer watches and an invisible Aston Martin - The Bourne Supremacy gives you a hysterical sobbing Julia Stiles, a roled up newspaper and a burnt out taxi in some debunked communist state. It's hardly glamourous but it's brutally effective and far more thrilling.
While anyone who's not a shady CIA spy would sound ridiculous calling it 'realistic' the average joe can still find intense satisfaction in the films logicality. What happens when two men are trained to the very peak of physical strength and have mastered completely a devistating martial art? They fight like school boys, that's what, each one's ability cancelling out the other's and they scuffle around an apartment desperatley trying to get the other into some sort of strangle hold, this is where the aforementioned rolled up magazine comes in.
It's also refreshing to see a film pretty much devoid of a Hollywood Love interest, Bourne's previous squeeze Marie is put out of the picture early on and when you think he's about to subject Julia Stiles to a steamy case of Stockholm syndrome, Bourne interrogates her to a point of sheer terror. The closest Bourne comes to any kind of affection is towards Pamela Landy, the very woman who is chasing him.
Acting is uniformly superb, new cast members like Joan Allen and Karl Urban fit right in to this kind of work and returning characters show no sign of getting stale, Brain Cox in particular is a real joy to watch but that's something you come to expect from one of the best actors around.
In a world of films like 'xXx', Bourne's Lo Fi thrills seem all the more essential. The filmmakers value substance over (material) style and thank God for that, they're at the start of an intellegent franchise that probably won't run as long as say, Bond, but already has the makers of other spy movies scrambling for Bourne's gritty edgy brand of action thriller. That can't be a bad thing.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but not as good as the original, 29 April 2005
This review is from: The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
I really enjoyed the Bourne Identity and was really looking forward to the Bourne Supremacy. While it didn't really disappoint, it certainly did not exceed my expectations.
This is a good film - it retains many of the strong elements of the first film: strong, believable performances, lots of tension and plenty of realistic action including some great chase sequences. However, in a number of important ways it does not reach the high standards of the first film. The plot is too similar to the first film and consequently a little predictable; some of the camera work/editing is too choppy and rather annoying. The cast is good and in particular Joan Allen is an excellent addition but Franka Potente is rarely on screen and is sorely missed.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A visual feast, pure cinema, 21 Nov. 2004
By 
Zorba "Zarbos" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
Having seen the original on the TV and being completely taken aback by a modern action movie where the action is actually filmed in real places in real time...I went along to the cinema to see this one full of anticipation. I was not disappointed; it was a visual feast, pure cinema everything and more you would want from action movie. Fast moving plot, nice detail, great characters, some terrific camera work and a fantastic car chase to act as the cherry on top of the icing. A must see.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the original - but do see them in order., 19 May 2008
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Can sequels be better than or as good as their predecessors...in this case yes!

The story sets off 2 years after the first one, and once again spans the globe in location and plot. Jason Bourne is back, but this time he's been tracked down by both the law and and an organised crime syndicated intent in framing him. The man-hunt is bigger and the fight / stunt scenes better. It's another quick, fast paced movie that grips you so much it'll keep you on the edge of your seat for the entire movie.

The characters remain the same and the continuity between this and the first movie is flawless.

Top marks for this one - definitely as good if not better than the original
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4.0 out of 5 stars . . . and this time it's personal, 15 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
Having seen the first Bourne movie, "The Bourne Identity," I had to see the sequel, since at the end of the first, Bourne had not recovered his memory and people at the CIA who did not wish him well were still alive and kicking. At the beginning of this one, Bourne seems to have settled for living with his girlfriend Marie in India, but his whereabouts come to the notice of his enemies and they come after him. Their attack makes things personal for Bourne to an extent that it hadn't been in "Identity," where self-preservation was as important as self-discovery. Chris Cooper having gone to his reward at the end of "Identity," his place seems to have been taken in the CIA by Pamela Landy (Joan Allen), who gets a version of Bourne from Ward Abbot (Brian Cox), who has every reason to paint him as a threat. The means by which Bourne finds out that they are after him again in a serious way makes for a great scene in a Naples police station, and from then on, Bourne is almost able to follow in real time the efforts to track him. This adds a cat-and-mouse dimension to the movie that wasn't in "Identity." More engaging, though, is Bourne's coming to realize more about some specific episodes in his past, and we begin to suspect that his amnesia is actually a form of denial of that past -- a denial of the characterization of him as a "killing machine," which was how Chris Cooper's character had described him, to his face, at the end of "Identity." At the end of this movie is a scene in Moscow in which Bourne takes responsibility for what he has done, and Matt Damon, again very good throughout, is careful not to let the ending get too sentimental.

Paul Greengrass directed this one, and his direction of the multiple car chases is certainly both thrilling and yet clear. It's possible that there are more car-chase minutes in this movie than the previous one, and I don't need all that Greengrass provides, but the human interest elements are well handled and outweigh in their effect the more formulaic and predictable things like car chases. At the end, Bourne knows a lot more than he did at the beginning, but still not everything . . . so the "Ultimatum" awaits.

Note: I don't get "Supremacy" in the title, unless all it means is that they haven't got him yet.
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The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004]
The Bourne Supremacy [DVD] [2004] by Paul Greengrass (DVD - 2005)
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