Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SON DISCOVERS FATHER THROUGH HIS ARCHITECTURAL ACHIEVEMENTS
Director Nathaniel Kahn had been the illegitimate son of Louis I. Kahn perhaps the world's most unique architect. Nathanial was the product if Louis' second of two sequential extramarital liaisons that he maintained during his life. Louis had a daughter with his wife, Esther, with whom he lived. Also, Louis had an illegitimate daughter with an earlier mistress...
Published on 8 Aug. 2006 by F. Sweet

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting architecture
Documentary by Nathaniel Kahn in which he attempts to find out more about his father, the late architect Louis A. Kahn, by visiting his buildings and talking to family members and colleagues. I found the architectural aspects interesting, the family story less so.
Published on 5 July 2008 by D. Brusca


Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SON DISCOVERS FATHER THROUGH HIS ARCHITECTURAL ACHIEVEMENTS, 8 Aug. 2006
By 
F. Sweet (Midwestern USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
Director Nathaniel Kahn had been the illegitimate son of Louis I. Kahn perhaps the world's most unique architect. Nathanial was the product if Louis' second of two sequential extramarital liaisons that he maintained during his life. Louis had a daughter with his wife, Esther, with whom he lived. Also, Louis had an illegitimate daughter with an earlier mistress.

Louis died suddenly, alone in New York City's Grand Central Station in 1974 at age 73. When he died, Louis was not carrying identification. Thus police investigators had to discover who Louis Kahn had been after which his unusual multiple family arrangement became public knowledge. Nathaniel was 11 years old then; now, these many years later, his documentary takes the form of a quest to discover thourgh Louis'buildings who his father had been.

The film is somewhat dichotomous. There's the personal side of Louis' life and there's the professional side with his extraordinary achievements as an architect. While there's no question that personal aspects often help illuminate artistic accomplishment, "My Architect," as a son's personal investigation, tends to devote more time to family matters than understanding Kahn's accomplishment. Indeed, the film makes clear that Kahn, the driven, workaholic architect, put his work ahead of all three families at all times. The work throws far more light on the relationships than the relationships do on the work.

Nathaniel's film uses the usual documentary techniques of interviews, talking heads, archival footage, photographs, letters and newspapers for telling its story. New footage takes us on tours of many of the important Kahn buildings: the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, the Salk Institute in La Jolla, the library at the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, the National Assembly in Dacca, Bangladesh. Louis' friend, art historian Vincent Skully, characterizes the Kahn buildings as works of symmetry, order, geometric clarity, and great weight; they are enduring monuments.

Not only are Kahn's buildings of exceptional beauty, but they are also a highly individual expression of modernism, totaly different from the prevailing walls of glass and steel that had come to dominate the cities of the world. Kahn's are buildings with a distinct air of mysticism influenced by its historical predecessors from the Egyptian Pyramids to medieval castles to 19th century industrial architecture.

Nathaniel, troubled by his family's history, insists that his half-sisters answer the question: "Are we a family?" Then virtually badgering his mother, Harriet, "Don't you get angry with him?" She doesn't answer, instead throwing the question back at him. He remains silent but his lingering conflicts are clear from the tone of the question itself. Wasn't Nathaniel listening when, in an earlier interview, Susannah Jones, his mother's close friend, says with conviction that Harriet's was "an immense, lifelong love...That kind of love is on the side of life and is a good thing?"

Seeing Kahn's spectacular, emotionally provocative architecture and Nathaniel's quest to discover through them who his father was is certainly worth seeing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Documentary - Flawed Extras, 22 Jun. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
Wonderful exploration of the life and work of the great American architect Louis Kahn, directed by the son he never openly acknowledged. Of the extras, the Q&A with Nathaniel Kahn is priceless, and includes this memorable quote from his father: "A good idea that doesn't happen is no idea at all."
Unfortunately, getting Tom Dawson (who he?) to conduct the 'exclusive UK interview' with Nathaniel Kahn wasn't a good idea. Kahn is engaging and interesting, while, off-camera, Dawson attempts the world record for saying 'yeah', 'yes!', and 'right' at inopportune moments. As result, sadly, the interview is virtually unwatchable.
But the film is reason enough to buy this DVD.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Architecture, life and love, 30 Mar. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
This journey to the heart of what it means to be human is also a poignant exploration of the life and loves of a great architect. Louis Kahn has reached almost mythical status as the architect of some of the most beautiful buildings in the world. He died mysteriously, leaving behind massive debts and three children who hardly knew him. This film is about his son's quest to piece together his father's legacy - to place his father, and therefore himself in the world. The architecture is incidental, but so sublime, that it becomes the central driver in exploring the ultimate question of 'who am I?'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My Architect, 6 Sept. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
I found this a fascinating film - really thoughtful and measured. It has the intrigue of relationships, family etc with a wider context of his work and his legacy - some amazing buildngs. Like a really good documentary on TV without all the dumbed down bits. Saved the best building till last, too. Recommended for anyone with even a vague interest in architecture.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting architecture, 5 July 2008
By 
D. Brusca (Derbyshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
Documentary by Nathaniel Kahn in which he attempts to find out more about his father, the late architect Louis A. Kahn, by visiting his buildings and talking to family members and colleagues. I found the architectural aspects interesting, the family story less so.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Beautiful Journey, 31 Dec. 2010
By 
Robin Ramsay (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
Not a dull moment in this sad but true adventure of finding one's father through his architectural legacy. If only we could all achieve what Louis Khan achieved, and be as human as he was, in both grandeur and weakness. Highly recommended to anyone with the courage to find out just who our parents truly are.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 20 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
Well done.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars nice documentary, but..., 25 Sept. 2008
This review is from: My Architect [2003] [DVD] (DVD)
Peoples attention on this movie is drawn by the name Louis Kahn, an Architect with an impressing oeuvre. But what they get when watching it is not only a fairly decent documentary about architecture. Egocentric Nathaniel Kahn, the film maker and neglected son of Louis Kahn is annoyingly adding his personal problems, that otherwise nobody would be interested in.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

My Architect [2003] [DVD]
My Architect [2003] [DVD] by Nathaniel Kahn (DVD - 2005)
Used & New from: £7.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews