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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars McFat can lead to McDeath
Morgan Spurlock came up with a terrific idea with this documentary of using himself as a guinea pig, even if it meant temporarily endangering his health and suffering some indigestion. Under medical supervision, he went to 20 cities and only ate at McDonald's, eating everything on the menu at least once for 30 days. Spurlock certainly has done a service in a cause I...
Published on 5 July 2005 by Alejandra Vernon

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars really disgusting, by design
Ok, I greatly enjoyed this film, in all its misinformation and grotesquerie. Spurlock (only Dickens could have coined a better name for him) wanted to show that with dietary excess, comes personal horror and poor health. He did, by consuming approximately 5000 calories a day or more, with three super-sized meals a day at McDonald's. He also quit exercising...
Published on 17 Aug. 2011 by rob crawford


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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars McFat can lead to McDeath, 5 July 2005
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
Morgan Spurlock came up with a terrific idea with this documentary of using himself as a guinea pig, even if it meant temporarily endangering his health and suffering some indigestion. Under medical supervision, he went to 20 cities and only ate at McDonald's, eating everything on the menu at least once for 30 days. Spurlock certainly has done a service in a cause I believe in, to educate people in nutrition and the dangers of digging one's grave with fast food container. Above his message of dietary abuse, Spurlock is also an excellent filmmaker, and deftly balances facts, interviews, and the progress of his personal foray into the world of greasy, sugary junk food, often with a good slice of humor. Yes, it is manipulated in parts, but there is so much information in the film for those who eat in McDonald's or any of their competitors to learn, that a little embellishment is forgivable.
What puzzles me, is where have our taste buds gone? I remember many years ago attempting to eat a Big Mac, and having to spit it out. Much of the attraction is the "idea" of McDonald's...Ronald the clown, the toys, the packaging, as well as an addictive x factor to the food, and the film clearly points all this out. Among the DVD extras not to be missed is the long interview with Eric Schlossen, author of "Fast Food Nation," and the short segment on how Spurlock's garbage increased along with his waistline. Good cinematography by Scott Ambrozy and top notch editing add to the enjoyment of this award winning documentary, which has a running time of 100 minutes.
I live across the street from a high school, and see the future of America waddle in and out. I think it would be a good idea for all the kids and their families to watch this documentary, so that they become more aware of what they are doing to their health, and what the future costs will be in doctor's bills and medications. It does seem that the film (as well as a few lawsuits) has influenced the market however, by eliminating the super sizes, and enlarging the options in the menu. Bravo! Morgan Spurlock, for his "Film of Epic Portions", which educates as well as amuses.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Surprises, 1 Mar. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
the documentary does exactly what you expect it to do and does it intelligently and with maximum impact. Spurlock's journey is fascinating to watch and the effects of a McDiet are more horrible than you can imagine, even his doctors are surprised and distressed. Spurlock's greatest documentary skill, however, is in letting people speak for themselves. He gets people talking about food and their weight without any voice over or commentary -- you get to draw your own conclusions -- something Michael Moore could learn from. Definitely worth watching, even if you think you know what it's about. Plenty to surprise you.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Put you off junk food for life!, 4 Feb. 2005
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
This film should be shown to all kids at school. the film was making good points, it didn't over-labour them. The film let you make your own mind up. My conclusion was to eat junk food more than once a month was just damn harmful.
Good, informative, entertaining film - enjoy without fries!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars really disgusting, by design, 17 Aug. 2011
By 
rob crawford "Rob Crawford" (Balmette Talloires, France) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
Ok, I greatly enjoyed this film, in all its misinformation and grotesquerie. Spurlock (only Dickens could have coined a better name for him) wanted to show that with dietary excess, comes personal horror and poor health. He did, by consuming approximately 5000 calories a day or more, with three super-sized meals a day at McDonald's. He also quit exercising.

Well, anyone who ate that much would get sick and fat. I have returned to the US after 6 years in Europe, and I am SHOCKED by what a normal portion is in the US. Fast food is not designed to be eaten that much, and I bet not even McDonald's executives would want him to eat like that. So, in the end, this film and his expanding waistline and alarming health indicators are purposefully engineered. If you look at what he did in this way, it is disingenuous.

It is sad that many less-educated Americans do as he did, albeit they do over a slightly longer period of time than one month of supersizing. He just did it more purely, and by conscious effort. That is what is valuable about this film: he demonstrates, with his own body, what some less educated people do as a matter of course over several years.

Spurlock is similar to Michael Moore, if a lesser talent. By exaggeration and grotesque simplification, they make great propaganda. I identify somewhat with their agenda and respect the way that they stir the pot - otherwise, the fat would rise to the top - but their work is not the kind of investigative journalism that starts out without message already chosen. It is a kind of muckraking entertainment, edumuckraking if you will.

That being said, the impact of this film is positive in balance, I believe. It gets people to think - at least in my case. It is a great spur to discussion, even if I disagree in the end. Spurlock is a bit like Seymour Hersh, but is more entertaining than the great investigative journalist, and he doesn't pretend to be all that objective.

The impact of this film is visceral disgust, and it does it phenomenally well. But there is another side in the details, and I believe, in the sincerity of people who are concerned with these issues within McDonald's. From experience (and I am not a McDonald's employee), I know that there are many McDonald's executives who care personally about what their company does, all within the limits of their business model; they are trying to change their company for the common good. I admit, I am impressed by many of them. Their company may not be perfect, but it is beginning to listen to some of its critics. Spurlock's film would be better if it had more balance.

Recommended, but exercise your critical intelligence!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Fun, 1 Mar. 2005
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
Thoroughly enjoyed this film. In the Michael Moore vein of commentary on American life and society, but not so bad-tempered. Well, of course eating nothing but lots of MacDonald's meals for a month would probably not be good for you, but watching the process in action is fascinating and repelling! Good to watch with teenagers.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars finger-lickin' frightening, 20 Jan. 2005
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
As a keen fast food lover myself this dvd made me feel physically sick, especially the extra footage of the fries. Macdonalds fries did not decompose or gather mould at all, not even after 10 weeks or standing. Imagine what they are doing in your body!
Its not only a great watch for the health conscious, but for those dieting and losing motivation, watch this! you will never fun so fast on that treadmil or eat so much salad! It has certainly turned my views around.
I found this dvd entertaining, shocking, frightening, disgusting and funny. What more could anyone ask for? But I will warn you, it made me very very hungry!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Got me craving a "4 x 4", 5 Oct. 2004
By 
Mr. Joe (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
A "4 x 4" is a quadruple cheeseburger (4 meat patties, 4 slices of cheese) sold off-menu by a burger chain well known in the SoCal area, a semi-surreptitious transaction reminiscent of the whispered come-on, "Hey, mister, want to buy some dirty pictures?", of a long-ago, less liberated era. I'm salivating just thinking about it - with fries, of course.
SUPER SIZE ME is an absorbing and informative documentary ostensibly targeting McDonald's as the purveyors of nutritionally nasty food that's undermining the foundations of global health. Writer/director Morgan Spurlock volunteered himself to eat nothing but McDonald's fast food for thirty consecutive days while having his physical health and blood chemistries monitored by medical and dietary professionals. Morgan had several self-imposed "rules". He had to eat all three daily meals at the chain, consume every item on the Golden Arches menu at least once, and agree to "supersize" his order if asked by the sales clerk. Morgan sampled outlets across the U.S., including California, Texas, Ohio, and New York.
By Day Thirty, Spurlock had gained 27 pounds while driving his liver enzymes, cholesterol, and triglycerides levels up into the heart palpitations range. But, over and above documenting this personal self-abuse, Spurlock mainly examines the effects of fast food on the nation's young - the insidious insinuation of the stuff into school lunch programs, and the wickedly pervasive advertising by the evil fast food giants designed to hook children for life before the inevitable triple bypass. The documentary visually reinforces the message with shot after shot of grossly overweight citizens both behind and in front of the McDonald's cash registers.
For all its slick presentation, one is left with the unanswerable question, "OK, so now what?" Do governments - local, state, and federal - pass laws prohibiting the sale of the classic cheeseburger/fries/Coke meal? And what about pizza, my own personal favorite that I'd eat three times a day - with a fried chicken chaser - if I could get away with it? Haven't we already tried that approach with alcohol, drugs, prostitution, and porn? And those crusades went well!
While I personally love greasy fast food, and fantasize doing a side-by-side taste comparison of the locally available cheeseburgers all in the space of a day, I prudently don't indulge more often than once every two weeks. Perhaps it comes down to an informed personal responsibility, self-respect, and a wife that makes me eat my veg, rather than the need for a Nutrition Gestapo, which is perhaps an extrapolation to be favored by bleeding hearts after viewing this admittedly Oscar-worthy film.
SUPER SIZE ME will either make you weep for America's future, or bring a smile to your face as you contemplate the futile idiocy of certain causes. Either way, it's provocative entertainment.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant film!, 11 Mar. 2005
By 
Lesley Braden (Orpington, Kent United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Super Size Me [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Watch this ! and more importantly give it to your children to watch. It is because people DONT understand the long-term effects of eating this junk that it is so important to understand.
If you buy one film, please buy this one.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Super Size Me, 17 Jan. 2006
By 
M. Terry "emptyplod" (Hertfordshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
A thoroughly entertaining, thoughtful, gut-wrenching, informative and well-presented documentary. Always funny while presenting serious dietary information and global consumer fare in an impactive and min-boggling way. I found this well made, contemplative, unassuming and yet tightly produced. The frightening results are quite literally dreadful and disturbing and anyone contemplating a fast food diet needs to see this first.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fallen arches, 12 Dec. 2004
By 
Budge Burgess (Troon, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Super Size Me [DVD] [2004] (DVD)
Many years ago, a Canadian friend achieved the ambition of a lifetime by taking a trip to China. She woke up first morning to discover a McDonalds down the road from her hotel. She felt harassed. She'd spent her whole life trying to assert her own culture and escape the clutches of US monopolies. But the franchise of the bland had beaten her to China, ready to burger yet more of the world's great cuisines.
"Super Size Me" is the latest, and one of the most successful, efforts to geld the Golden Arches and stop their further reproduction. As an institution, McDonalds has been in the visible vanguard of globalisation. George Ritzer's books "The McDonalization of Society" and "The McDonaldization Thesis" exposed the firm's single-minded pursuit of economy, efficiency, and standardisation in marketing and supply. It's not just that the burgers taste the same wherever you go, but the product range and treatment of staff are the same - and there are few concessions to local culture. As a Scot, I'm still outraged they pinched a solid Scots name for their flabby firm!
Of course, it's in its homeland, the USA, that McDonalds grew fat, and it's there that Morgan Spurlock carries out his experiment in gastronomic monogamy. Remaining faithful to a diet of burgers, chips, salt and sugar, Spurlock puts on nearly two stone in his thirty day marathon as he eats his way across the States, dining nowhere but McDonalds. He gained nearly a pound a day! Not to mention his cholesterol levels peaking!
Lest you imagine that the whole film is an extended version of the publicity poster and DVD cover, we don't spend a couple of hours simply watching Spurlock stuff his face. This is actually a decent attempt at investigative journalism - and to be seriously welcomed for that. It's an interesting trend. In recent years the world's major newspapers have largely forsaken their investigative role - I can still remember the Sunday Times Insight Team coming up with real news. Much of the newspaper and magazine industry is now given over to hype - celebrity tittle-tattle and PR stories.
But television has been biting back with some investigative exposures. And Michael Moore has demonstrated that radical - even partisan - research can break through in the cinema and DVD market.
So, more power to Spurlock's elbow. His film takes a bun in cheek look at the USA's eating habits. He doesn't just grow fat off the bland, he talks to people, interviews people, explores the science of the composition - or decomposition - of the burger. It's horrifying stuff.
An excellent, well-paced documentary, making good use of humour and ... yes, irony. "Super Size Me" is further proof that a low budget film can break through and challenge, not just McDonalds, but the whole, hyped-up film industry with its dependency on stars and special effects. An excellent package with a very acceptable set of extras.
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Super Size Me [DVD] [2004]
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