Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Unheralded Trio a revelation, 5 April 2008
By 
D. Picken (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dvorak Violin Concerto (Audio CD)
This is a first-class recording and superbly played throughout. The revelation is the Piano Trio no 3 which I did not know but now place up there with the Dvorak Piano Quintet as being his best Chamber music. In particular the second movement is infectious from first hearing and the third is achingly beautiful. I can't recommend this too strongly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most convincing; most winning!, 9 Jun 2012
By 
enthusiast "enthusiast" (sussex, uk) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Amazon Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dvorak Violin Concerto (Audio CD)
This is a wonderful account of the Dvorak concerto - perhaps the one that convinces us more than any other that it belongs among the great Romantic violin concertos. There are so many "young violinists" before us at the moment and many are attracting huge praise. I have sampled a few and have sometimes been duly impressed but Faust is something special. Within a few bars in the concerto you know you are listening to an exceptional violinist. It isn't about the sound she makes (which is lovely) or her phrasing (which is accomplished) ... it is something less tangible ... or more akin to electricity. It makes your ears alert. And what you hear is a most magical and beautiful account of the work: Faust playing is singingly spontaneous. There is a strong streak of fantasy. And an oomph ... that quality that comes from musicians playing together and enjoying the experience. The trio is new to me and is a lovely work, filled with rich warm melodies. Those who have already encountered Faust's partnership with Melnikov in chamber music will know to expect some magical and beautiful music making. A treasurable CD - highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars prize-winning performances ; wonderful!, 16 Mar 2007
By 
Mr. Ian A. Macfarlane "almac1975" (Fife, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dvorak Violin Concerto (Audio CD)
This CD won a critics' award from the 'Gramophone' magazine, and it's no wonder. The Concerto is played with complete conviction and assurance. It's not the very best Dvorak, but it sits well for the violin and is a very attractive piece. Isabelle Faust combines the athleticism of the lively passages with the wistfulness of the more thoughtful ones with great assurance, and she is idiomatically partnered by Jiri Belohlavek, a fine Czech conductor. The Trio is a revelation. I didn't know the piece, but it is glorious, a better work than the Concerto really, and it's played for all it is worth here. Faust may be the Concerto soloist, but in the Trio the work is shared out equally and it is a real chamber performance, beautifully balanced and wonderfully played. This is an outstanding CD, as 'The Gramophone' decided.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seriously impressive readings of both works that stand out from the crowd, 27 Dec 2013
By 
I. Giles (Argyll, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Amazon Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dvorak Violin Concerto (Audio CD)
This disc, very well recorded in 2003, offers a relatively unusual coupling but one that actually makes sense, particularly bearing in mind the readings that are also offered. Both of these works were written close to each other and at a time when the composer was influenced strongly by Brahms' example. In addition the third trio was written at a time when Dvorak had experienced recent bereavements. These considerations are mentioned, quite rightly, in the sleeve notes and those considerations have had an impact on these somewhat individual readings.

The concerto was written in 1879-80 and the trio in 1893. They pre-date the seventh symphony which is by far the most 'symphonic' of the late symphonies and the least Slavonic. Considering the trio first, this is given an emotionally tough reading with very little emphasis laid upon the Slavonic features such as those found in the Allegro grazioso of the second movement or the final movement. Instead the approach is much darker and more central European with the dramatic elements brought to the fore rather than the folk elements. The tempi are similar to most Slavonic performances but the phrasing within those tempi is less buoyant, less grazioso, and the accenting is more symphonically forceful. Bearing in mind the emotional state of distress that Dvorak was in at the time, this seems to be a perfectly valid, if unusual, view of the trio. The playing of the trio members is both excellent and completely committed to this interpretation which is completely convincing in its own right.

The concerto, equally, has more symphonic weight and less of the Slavonic nature to it than usual. It therefore inhabits a completely different emotional world to Josef Suk's legendary recording on Supraphon or Sarah Chang's on EMI for example which both deliver a lighter touch and more of the Slavonic dance. nevertheless, once more, Isabelle Faust is completely convincing in her more 'Brahmsian' approach to the work which, in her hands, becomes more centrally placed in the European romantic concerto repertoire.

In both cases the recording quality is strikingly good and is far better than Suk, Chang, Ehnes and Vengerov which are the other four recordings that it has been compared with.

I would suggest that this is a very worthy alternative view, and as such, will be of particular interest to collectors of multiple versions. Those looking for an 'only' version may prefer one with more Slavonic focus. That is not to suggest that this is in any way inferior, but just to acknowledge that the focus is that bit more serious than is often the case. Dark clouds on the horizon rather than all round sun which may be more realistic ultimately.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best recordings of the Dvorak Violin Concerto, 10 Oct 2013
By 
Camil Moujaber (Owosso, Michigan USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Amazon Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dvorak Violin Concerto (Audio CD)
---Gramophone---
The concerto has seen a spate of recordings in recent years, but with vivid recording in the Rudolfinum in Prague, this intense version is one of the most distinctive.

---Classics Today, artistic quality: 9/10, sound quality: 9/10---
Isabelle Faust is an excellent artist, and she turns in a winning performance of Dvorák's sunny Violin Concerto, a work that has steadily returned to public favor (and rightly so) in the past couple of decades. My only criticism of this performance concerns a slight stiffness of rhythm at the opening of the finale that you will not find in such celebrated interpretations as Suk/Ancerl on Supraphon-however, Faust quickly gets into the swing of things as the movement proceeds, thanks in large part to Jiri Bélohlávek's totally idiomatic conducting and the sharply focused rhythmic response of his orchestra. In the first two movements, Faust offers as fine an interpretation as any, playing with purity of timbre and inflecting Dvorák's gorgeous tunes with sweetness and, where required, with passion (especially in the opening movement). She's also naturally balanced against the orchestra, allowing some very winning give and take between the soloist and the band in the central Adagio ma non troppo. Coupling the Violin Concerto with Dvorák's finest trio is an excellent idea. Once again, the performance does not quite rise to the level of, say, the Suk Trio, particularly in the first movement where Faust and company sacrifice a bit of the music's intensity for the sake of urgency; but if it's a fault, it's certainly one in the right direction. The two-against-three rhythms of the scherzo bounce along quite effectively, and the Poco adagio, the heart of the work, also is very beautifully played, with cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras offering generous tone but never sounding sappy. The finale also revels in high spirits, though like the first movement it just misses the depth of elegiac feeling that other players bring to the closing pages, just before the ebullient ending. Small quibbles aside, these performances are highly recommendable-and benefit from terrific sound. If this coupling appeals to you, don't hesitate for a moment.

---All Music, James Leonard, 3.5/5--- (a bit unfair in my opinion)
For some reason, Dvorák's warm, round, lovely, and lyrical Violin Concerto has never made it as one of the big-time nineteenth century violin concertos. Who can tell why? Perhaps because the big-time twentieth century violin virtuosos didn't take it up like they did the concertos of Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Mendelssohn, and Bruch? Perhaps because the 1961 recording of the work by Czech violinist Josef Suk remains the definitive recording and none of the violinists who took it up could never quite compare with Suk's.
But, inevitably every decade or so, a young violin virtuoso will take up Dvorák's concerto and this decade's violinist is Isabelle Faust. A very talented player, Faust honorably acquits herself, but her performance cannot quite compare with Suk's. Her phrasing is warm, her tone is round, her lines are lovely, and her interpretation is lyrical. But for all that, Faust is still playing the work from the outside. Supported by the great Czech conductor Jirí Belohlávek leading the Prague Philharmonic, Faust's performance misses greatness by the small but insuperable distance between her to the music. Faust's performance of Dvorák's passionately melancholy Piano Trio in F minor with violinist Jean-Guihen Queyras and pianist Alexander Melnikov is superbly played and passionately interpreted, but unfortunately misses the work's melancholy heart. Harmonia Mundi's digital sound is warm and round, but a bit too close.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa1b604a4)

This product

Dvorak Violin Concerto
Dvorak Violin Concerto by Johannes Brahms (Audio CD - 2008)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews