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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NO MONKEY BUSINESS
A GREAT CLASSIC VERSION OF THE TARZAN STORY.
I TOOK MY STEP SON TO VISIT GREYSTOKE HOUSE IN THE LAKE DISTRICT A FEW WEEKS AGO, I AM NOT SURE IF ITS THE RIGHT GREYSTOKE, BUT IT MADE ME TELL HIM THE LEGEND AND STORY OF TARZAN, HE IS 10 AND HAD NEVER SEEN THIS MOVIE, AND KNEW VERY LITTLE ABOUT THE STORY, SO I BOUGHT THE DVD. HE LOVED IT, JUST AS MUCH AS I DID WHEN I...
Published on 14 Jan 2010 by R. Baird

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars king of the swingers
One of the most popular figures of (pulp)fiction and the movies was finally taken seriously in 1984's epic Greystoke. Having read all 24 books- more than once- and grown up on the B-movie Tarzans fron Johnny Weissmuller to Mike Henry, and not forgetting the 6os TV Tarzan Ron Ely, I remember how excited I was when the Greystoke project was announced. Was I happy with the...
Published on 12 Oct 2004 by Michael Ings


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NO MONKEY BUSINESS, 14 Jan 2010
By 
R. Baird (South west Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A GREAT CLASSIC VERSION OF THE TARZAN STORY.
I TOOK MY STEP SON TO VISIT GREYSTOKE HOUSE IN THE LAKE DISTRICT A FEW WEEKS AGO, I AM NOT SURE IF ITS THE RIGHT GREYSTOKE, BUT IT MADE ME TELL HIM THE LEGEND AND STORY OF TARZAN, HE IS 10 AND HAD NEVER SEEN THIS MOVIE, AND KNEW VERY LITTLE ABOUT THE STORY, SO I BOUGHT THE DVD. HE LOVED IT, JUST AS MUCH AS I DID WHEN I FIRST SAW IT. ALSO AS WE HAD VISITED THE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM IN LONDON LAST SUMMER, IT WAS ALL VERY RELIVENT.

A FAB FILM, FOR ALL THE FAMILY TO ENJOY, IT HAS AGED FAIRLY WELL, AND IS A GREAT YARN TO BE ENJOYED ON A WET SUNDAY INFRONT OF THE FIRE.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greystoke, 3 July 2005
By 
Rich Milligan (Thatcham, Berkshire) - See all my reviews
For me this is the definitive Tarzan film, no other adaptation of the Edgar Rice Burrows books comes anywhere near and for pure authenticity reasons alone this film is a superb version.
What, I think, makes the film so good is its very subtle, almost subdued angle on the Tarzan legend. There's no beating of the chest and vine swinging acrobatics. There's no wrestling with crocodiles or "Me Tarzan, You Jane!" dialogue. Instead it takes a very realistic approach, giving real thought to how a human raised by apes might behave. It is also a very obvious forerunner of the some of ecological thoughts that we now take as part of everyday life. Who is the savage in the film? The Apes or the Victorian population? Is our society really any advanced from the wild in terms of respect for others or in terms of cruelty?
The performances of the various actors are with one exception, superb. Christopher Lambert was perfectly cast as the taciturn, sad eyed Tarzan. He brings gentle steel to the role and he virtual "unknown-ness" at this point in his career was a boon. Ian Holm is likewise excellent as the explorer who finds Tarzan, Phillippe D'Arnot. Ralph Richardson quite possibly steals the show with such a tenderhearted performance as the Earl of Greystoke and fully deserved his posthumous nomination for an Oscar. As I say the one blimp on the landscape is that of Andie MacDowell. I scratch my head every time I see her in any lead role and still cannot for the life of me figure out why she has had such a successful career, even though nowadays we mostly see her in the advert breaks! It's not surprising her voice was dubbed over by Glenn Close, it's just a shame she wasn't replaced totally.
One final plaudit for the film is the superb costumes and actions of the apes. Obviously if the film were remade today these whole sequences would be film with CGI brilliance, but never the less the most incredible life like suits and the brilliant mimicking of primate actions has stood the test of time fantastically well.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars king of the swingers, 12 Oct 2004
One of the most popular figures of (pulp)fiction and the movies was finally taken seriously in 1984's epic Greystoke. Having read all 24 books- more than once- and grown up on the B-movie Tarzans fron Johnny Weissmuller to Mike Henry, and not forgetting the 6os TV Tarzan Ron Ely, I remember how excited I was when the Greystoke project was announced. Was I happy with the result? Well yes and no. The film looks fantastic - the jungle scenes are atmospheric and beautifully filmed. The apes were a revelation and still look good today despite the onset of CGI effects. Christopher Lambert was supremely well cast in the title role, a good decision to move away from the muscle-bound image of the character, and he brilliantly portrays the central dilemna of a man caught between two very different worlds. Best of all is Sir Ralph Richardson, in his last screen role, as Lord Greystoke - Tarzan's grandfather. My only reservation really was the overriding bleakness of the film. Tarzan is orphaned early on,loses his ape mother to hunters' arrows, his grandfather and his ape father. Apart from Tarzan, Jane, D'Arnot and Lord Greystoke everyone seems particularly dislikeable, selfish and seedy as "civilisation" is found wanting alongside the lore of the wild. It all becomes rather over-wrought and melodramatic. That said, I would heartily recommend the film as it raises the story to a higher level and tackles some weighty ideas. Having waited so long for its tranfer to DVD it is a pity that so few extras are included. The film is the same as the theatrical cut, and that which was available on video, despite extra scenes being available including an alternative ending. The audio commentary is amiable enough, if rather self-congratulatory, but rather technical - more anecdotal stuff would have been good. No mention of Andi McDowell's voice being dubbed by Glenn Close - is this just a malicious rumour? No booklet, no history of Tarzan in the movies, No "making of" - a wasted opportunity. I'd give the film 4 stars, but the DVD only 3.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Two films in One, 7 Jun 2010
Other reviewers have commented that this is the most faithful adaptation of the original book to have appeared on screen, and I won't argue with that, never having read it.
Certainly the first half of the film lives up to its promise. The recreation of the murky jungle of the Belgian Congo is perfect, making you feel as if you've walked into the pages of a Joseph Conrad novel. The characterisation is wonderful - David Suchet stands out in a small but unforgettable part as a corrupt and louche Belgian tradepost manager-cum-white slaver, and Ian Holm as the trader/explorer who discovers Greystoke is similarly note-perfect. An unforgettable moment is where the explorers chance upon a tribe of pygmies living in the derelict carcass of a dead elephant - one of the most perfect pieces of cinema that I've ever seen.
However, it all goes downhill once the action shifts away from the Congo and to Britain, where Greystoke is taken to claim his inheritance. We have the obligatory love story, with Greystoke rescuing his simpering love-interest from the clutches of a Victorian Music Hall-style villain, intent on the Greystoke inheritance. There are the (would-be) comedic attempts to turn the Apeman into an English country gentleman (kippers and custard, quite literally). Ralph Richarson turns in a good performance as the Lord of the manor from whom the Apeman will ultimately gain his inheritance (a performance not dissimilar to the one he played, as God, in "Time Bandits" and one which, come to think of it, is not dissimilar to almost every other perfromance of his that I've seen). Everyone involved does their damndest to make it work; but once the location is moved from the Congo, all dramatic tension is lost. One has the sense that one is watching two films, the first (set in the Congo) almost impossibly good, the second (set in England) vapid and empty. I feel that they should have done with this film what they did with "The Admirable Crichton" - keep it all on its original location and leave what happens later in England to the viewer's imagination.
This is a very typical Hugh Hudson film. Like "Revolution", the production values are immaculate (no doubt the costs were astronomical too), but the people behind the production can't make the film work as a story. Still, at least with "Greystoke" you can watch the first half without wanting to walk out, which is more than you can say for "Revolution". I'd recommend watching it up until the action shifts from the Congo to England - then switch off and give it to Oxfam.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 30 Oct 2004
By 
Ward-Minter (British Virgin Islands) - See all my reviews
This is the only "true" adaptation from the book. There is no swinging between vine ropes, no arrrrrrghhhhh arrrrrrrrghhhhhhh, no "Cheater the Chimp", no "Me Tarzan you Jane" and no giant spiders. In fact the name "Tarzan" is not even mentioned in the movie.

Christopher Lambert who was not yet a household name makes his impression on the film quite magnificently. From Lord of the Apes to British aristocracy he plays the part with real passion from start to end. Lambert's rapport with Sir Ralph Richardson is very touching. Bringing together one of the legends of the Silver Screen with a new dashing Hollywood actor was quite brilliant

Ian Holm (Bilbo Baggins) is also well cast in the role of a Belgian traveller. There are also lots of famous cameo appearances such as Charles Fox and David Suchet.

Andi MacDowell is the quint-essential British Jane providing the inevitable love interest for Lambert. It is noteworthy to mention that the editors at the time believed that MacDowell's English accent was too American. She was completely dubbed by Glen Close without knowing it untill the opening night. Why they dubbed an American with another American, I do not know.

The make up department is top notch. The apes are better than even the mega budget "Planet of the Apes" nearly 20 years later. At times it is hard to accept that the apes are not real.

This movie will make you laugh and make you cry. The set locations are fabulous and the acting is sublime.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Greystoke region free Blu ray review., 13 April 2014
By 
Hugh Hudson's muddled but gorgeous looking adaption of Edgar Rice Burroughs Tarzan legend arrives on a region free Blu ray disk as part of the Warner Archives collection. The version used on this release is the same extended cut released on home video by Warner since the early 90s and runs around six minutes longer than it did theatrically.
Often maligned by critics ever since its release Greystoke The Legend Of Tarzan, Lord Of The Apes can be an infuriating experience but if you disregard the plot holes, odd pacing and uneven script there is much to enjoy here. First and foremost this is one fantastic looking movie. This was one of the first features to be shot in Super 35 and the cinematography is simply wonderful from the lush jungles of Cameroon through to the elegant sweeping English countryside of the third act. The special make up effects used for the chimpanzees by Rick Baker are incredible considering the era this was made and lets not forget the performances especially Christopher Lambert who manages to convey so much emotion despite hardly saying a word especially in the first two acts that you as the viewer do honestly believe he could have been brought up by the apes. Of course everyone knows the story of Tarzan lord of the apes and although this is a little different to your average Johnny Weissmuller flick there are plenty of reviews here on Amazon detailing the synopsis so I'll pass straight on to what is important when reviewing an older movie making its 1080p debut. How does it look and sound and is it worth an upgrade if you already own the movie on DVD.

The AVC encoded 1080p transfer is framed at the correct aspect ratio of 2.35:1 and put simply looks absolutely ravishing. The transfer was scanned from what appear to be near pristine elements and the results can easily be seen. Detail is remarkable in every sense so much so I found it hard to pick out one particular stand out scene. Everything from the thick jungle foliage through to the tiniest facial or clothing detail is reproduced exquisitely and depth is readily apparent. The interiors of Castle Greystoke in the third act show off how well this transfer deals with the intricate details of the antique furnishings really pulling objects out that would otherwise had been lost in a lesser transfer. Black levels are rich and deep essential for the gloomy jungle floors where light rarely reaches and the colours are vivid yet natural with the jungle greens benefiting the most. No over manipulation appears to have been used and the image retains a healthy amount of film grain and thanks to a massive 30mbps+ bitrate there are no compression or digital anomalies to distract from what is a demo worthy transfer and one of the best looking 80s films I have seen on the format.

The sound on Warner's Blu ray may not be as superior as the image but it certainly gives a good account of itself. Originally released in Dolby Stereo the track has been bumped up to modern 5.1 specifications and presented in a strong DTS HD MA mix. This lossless presentation provides ample stereo width across the front of the soundstage with plenty of effective left to right pans and ambiance. Dialogue is always centered and clear and foley effects have a nice amount of weight. The lavish score sounds rich and textured with good dynamic range and the LFE channel does pack a wallop when called upon. Surround effects can be limited but are mostly audiable during the dense jungle sections and to add general environmental effects as well as support to the music score.

The extras included on this American import are hardly extensive but do include an interesting enough but ultimately sparce and unenlightening commentary track with the director and producer of the movie which does leave lots of questions around this production unanswered. Also included is the original theatrical trailer presented In standard definition.

Greystoke The Legend Of Tarzan, Lord Of The Apes is a movie that is undoubtedly never going to be in any film fans top ten but for those with even the slightest soft spot for this often critically despised adaption this region free American import offers the best way to experience what is a extremely pretty picture of a movie in the best possible light.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good monkey-acting by Lambert, 28 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This is one of the best Tarzan movies. Good filming with little special effects. Apes look very real. Also good monkey-acting by Lambert. The scene when he screams his father is dead...gave me the shivers. Waiting for it to appear on DVD.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 10 July 2014
Very good!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tarzan, 11 April 2014
By 
The best Tarzan movie since Gordon Scott's movies in the 50s. This Bluray is not region A but region free. Why they dont state this fact i dont know?
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars highly under rated, 29 Jun 2005
this for my money is the best tarzan adaption. here treated like a literary novel source as opposed to the pulp of its origins. this is one of those film where i can find little fault, although critics have been less kind to it. as a story of alienation, and wanting to belong, i cannot fault it. christophe lamert is perfect as the sleek confused tarzan who is raised by the apes and brought back to humanity. sadly he never fulfilled the early promise he displayed here as an actor. the ape effects by rick baker are the most realisitc portrayed on screen. the photography is gorgeous. the music classical. and ralph richardson, perfect as the clayton elder. highly recommended for lovers of fine cinema, very much like the film.
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Greystoke: The Legend Of Tarzan [DVD] [1984]
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