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38
4.4 out of 5 stars
Tago Mago
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£49.39+£1.26shipping
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 10 June 2011
Can music can be so polarising. Either you love it or hate it. Can's music is unique, it set the sound for the late 1960's and it paved the way for so many other bands that came later on from the early punk bands through the buzzcocks and more recently porcupine tree.
Tago Mago is very strong rhythmically; start your listening with an open mind and let the music wash over you. Listened to like this in one sitting the later tracks like Augmn and Peking O make sense. If you start with these two, you will run a mile from Can.
For me, Can were the band that started me on a musical journey; they show that music is more than riff, verse, chorus, end. I've heard of musicians say that the music plays them - I think Tago Mago represents this.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 16 November 2011
I lost this LP about ten years ago. This made me sad. Yesterday, I received my copy of this 40th anniversary edition. This made me happy.
As everyone who has heard it knows, it is an amazing album. As one of the previous reviewers has stated, it is one of the best albums ever made. I don't know the ins and outs of the live recordings on the other CD but I do know that they sound great to me and allow listeners to see the band out of a studio context. I disagree with what the previous reviewer says about Duncan Fallowell's contribution - I really enjoyed the knowing updating of the liner notes which he wrote for the album's original release. He's also been closely associated with the band for a long period of time. I do have some qualms, however, about the very pointless 'box' packaging which houses the whole thing. Flimsy. I may throw this out.
Would I still have purchased this 40th anniversary edition if I still owned the vinyl. No, I wouldn't. It gets five stars because the original record is fantastic.
Thanks for your time and patience.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 27 January 2012
for all us CAN fans who already have the lp and the re=release on cd the main point of buying this cd is the live cd extra... there are 2 problems with it first its short only 45 mins and second the sound is poor and not as good as bootleg versions of the same concerts. What a shame and a great disappointment to me.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on 14 November 2011
Edit >>> I wrote the review below and stand by what I wrote at the time, but somebody since told me that the record mastering was done from a 48k DAT without converting to the normal CD 44.1k and that this accounts for the speed problem, but if you have the ability to fix this unforgivable mastering error, then it sounds just fine and you would have the real stereo version (as opposed to the mono version available on the web for many years.

Original comment >>> Oh what a disappointment as I was so looking forward to this!! What you get here is CD1 the same as the previous remastered version, plus the famous 1972 concert in MUCH lower sound quality than available on the web for years, which runs incredibly slow, about 5min longer or ~10% slow. A fair bit of this live material is also on the Can Box DVD in better quality.

This is just a rip-off and I cancelled my pre-order. Buy with caution only if you have none of this already.
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on 12 August 2008
Oh man, Can are so great. THEY REALLY MeAN IT. A small Japanese dude who used to be a busker, some other guys born and raised in Stockhausen's basement of madness, only let out when the suitably flack of the minds of their creator or for food. Crackers, mainly. Halleluhwah = God's heartbeats. That's what I read somewhere. I forget where// this music is so wonderfully free, like that bit in the shawshank redemption when the dude gets out and goes to live on a beach somewhere. that#s how this album feels, and it fills me with joy and awe and passion every time. Not a wasted note, screw the Aumgn haterz! So this is Tago Mago. Repeat it: Tago Mago. What does it mean?it means whatever you want it to mean, like the S in SCLUB7 as bradley once said. ya know, the sexy black dude. so this is it. music at some sort of bizarre peak. bring a shovel..
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on 12 December 2014
I saw Can live twice in the 70's once at the Roundhouse and once at some venue near Shaftesbury Ave. On both occasions I remember leaving both gigs hardly remembering any of the music I had just heard. It all seemed very trippy, rhythmic and improvised. Years later after reading Julian Cope's KrautRockSampler I endeavoured to acquaint myself with the mighty Can again Tago Mago being my main choice. Seeing that Copey holds this album in such high esteem. Well honestly apart from the track sole Halleluhwah with Jaki Liebezeit's incredible drumming I have to admit I find it a tad overrated. Sorry folks am I missing something?
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 15 November 2004
The finest most original innovative and spaced out recording of all time: still as brilliant and fresh sounding as it was in '71, and more psychedelic than The Velvet Underground jamming with Pink Floyd on Owsley's acid.

This version is also a brilliant bit of remastering, and cheaper than the imports previously available.
Be warned though - this is a 'SACD' compatible disc: which has been giving me gyp on some of the antique CD players I've tried to use it on - bizarrely enough the CD copy I made on PC plays perfectly in the aforementioned equipment. Hmmmm . . .
Can never released a bad album by the way, and Holger Czukay at 66 is still making music that sounds like it's come through a wormhole from the future. Check out his album 'The New Millenium' too.
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on 13 April 2014
...mainly because the ultra-heavy original UK cover is reproduced (Damo's hair!) & because of the live tracks.
The original studio LP is a landmark in contemporary music. Don't let revisionist prog-snobs tell you otherwise.
The live stuff is hairs standing up on your arms quality. Maybe you heard some of it on a bootleg somewhere.
If you can't find this edition + you don't own the original studio tracks in any format, go remedy. Immediately.
Music beyond my powers to describe adequately. A unique recording, a unique group. Rest in peace, Michael.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 15 February 2004
This is it. Although this album is around 30 years old it the one I return to again and again. Using equipment most musicians would laugh at, Can produced the most complex musical soundscapes ever committed in record when they recorded Tago Mago. The four members of the group have complete equality on this record. The bass playing is sparse and often hard to seperate from the drumming, Damo doesn't so much sing as use his voice as another musical instrument. The angular, scratchy guitar punctuates at the most unexpected moments and keyboard don't sound like keyboard. And driving it all is the most astonishing drumming ever. It is hard to beleive that Jaki has only two arms and legs at some points yet the percussion is never overwhelming and certainly not in the style of Prog Rock bands which were contenporary to this album. When you listen to it you realise that it is a blueprint for much music that came after. Listen to it and love it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 17 August 2010
Can are one of the most influential bands to emerge in the entire history of rock. Their influence is so widespread that there is virtually no band in the modern era who has not been touched by their magic. The clue to the band's significance is that they successfully bridged electronic, jazz and rock music's in an accomplished and original way.

Their originality stems from the fact that they were the first group of musicians to have organically studied rhythm and texture that constituted their instrumental jams of a mainly hypnotic and glacial nature. These jams straddled the line between free-jazz, acid-rock and chamber music that were articulate experiments in loosely structured, fragmented and subdued electronic soundscapes and menacing atmospherics.

Arguably, Can were to master these techniques with their monumental Tago Mago (1971), a work blinded by Eastern mystical overtones and immersed in a jungle of avantegarde collage and sound effects within an overall structure that was guided by rock music.

'Paperhouse' opens the album with an agonizing blues, but at the first opportunity the guitar intones a cosmic psalm over tribal drumming, and then, teased by sinister whispers, unleashes a raga-like whirwind of rapidly strummed metallic tones.

In 'Mushroom' Suzuki's psychodramatic vocals overlay a rarefied atmosphere of skitting drums, booming bass and atonal guitar.

In 'Oh Yeah' Suzuki's voice is again centre-stage but this time the pace is a steady syncopated gallop that fills a void resplendent with an unpredictable crescendo of dissonance and blues guitar.

The eleven-minute 'Peking O' mutates into an exercise in the Dadaist deconstruction of dance music. The rhythm is a kind of Bossa Nova that implodes into a supersonic industrial beat against the backdrop of a wilting inconsequential jazz piano. The piece ends in an orgy of random drones, theatrical vocals and metronomic drums.

'Bring Me Coffee Or Tea', is basically a delirious Eastern-infused psychedelic meditation.

The centrepiece and crowning achievement of the album is the towering 18-minute funk workout, 'Halleluwa' - a mezmerizing rhythmic orgy of music and tribal chanting whose rhythmic pulse predicted Happy Monday's, Primal Scream and Stone Roses amongst others.

Slowly, the African component of the rhythm takes over and obliterates everything else. After five minutes the piece restarts in a purely instrumental form with a new funky pattern as the habitat for a population of both instrumental, vocal and artificial noises. This is followed by some improvisational jazz which is punctuated by irregular drumming and looping keyboards.

The 17-minute 'Aumgn' starts as a spatial floating hymn to pyschedelia, then disipates into musique concrete and Dadaistic 'sound-painting' noise complete with added percussive hues and shadings. Suzuki's voice eventually emerges as a kind of distorted mantric chant that blends with the fluid amalgam of free tones.

As the piece reaches its conclusion, drumming patterns fill the void to create a dramatic tension that finally guide the music towards a narrative and emotional ending.

With this one album, Can pioneered several genres that would become popular in the 1990s: industrial music, noise-rock, trip-hop and post-rock. But there is only one Can.
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