Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A flawed masterpiece that enriches our musical world
This album is essential listening for anyone interested in the possibilities of where rock music can go. It fuses rock with aspects of keyboard-driven classical music. Despite the classical elements, it is absolutely NOT an offering from a bunch of nice, testosterone-deficient middle-class white boys. This album goes for the jugular from the word go, and just never lets...
Published on 20 Aug. 2006 by Mr. N. Wulfricson

versus
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 2012 "Deluxe Edition" Review
Big disappointment, I'm sad to say. I don't blame Steven Wilson so much as I blame his method. This remix has excellent tonality, doesn't sound EQd or compressed or anything, but it is DEAD. The instruments sound dry, sterile and uninvolving. The reverb ideas used on the original stereo master mix are all missing. I just cannot imagine anyone would think this could ever...
Published on 5 Oct. 2012 by Jeff Carney


‹ Previous | 1 2 36 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A decent debut, but better albums followed, 3 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Emerson Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
ELP's debut album, (1970), fully demonstrates the promise of this talented 3 piece outfit without quite delivering the goods; indeed this project seems to be somewhat lacking in cohesion to my ears. 'The Barbarian', adapted from a Bela Bartok composition, certainly allows Keith Emerson to display his excellent keyboard skills and is a solid opener here. 'Take A Pebble' - a Greg Lake composition - is next up and weighs in at a mighty 12½ minutes; this song starts well but then gets bogged down in 'Crimson-esque' fiddling which I find tedious. Track 3, 'Knife-Edge', is an absolute corker and is probably the best featured here; there are significant contributions from all 3 individuals with strong, rocky vocals from Lake. 'The Three Fates' is really just another opportunity for Emerson to show off his wonderful talents, although this time he employs the likes of church organ as well as piano to dazzle the listener. 'Tank' is an interesting Emerson/Palmer composition although, essentially, it is merely an extended drum solo with some keyboard frippery. Lake's pretty ballad, 'Lucky Man', rounds proceedings off rather nicely but the overriding feeling is that this album is not really the product of 3 people pulling in the same direction. Even so, there are some great moments here and I would suggest buying this after investing in 'Tarkus', 'Trilogy' and 'Brain Salad Surgery', their next 3 studio releases.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic - Before Self Indulgence Took Over, 8 Sept. 2008
By 
Mr. Peter Steward "petersteward" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
How often do we find with classic groups that their first album is arguably the best? That certainly holds true with what is a classic prog rock album before the flights of fancy overtook them and they began to produce rather bombastic over the top rock.

It shows without doubt what a great band this trio could have been. Okay they stayed pretty good but at times they allowed their virtuosity to run away with them. Here it is more or less kept in check although there are signs at times of Keith Emerson running away with himself.

Overall there's just enough discipline to keep this album together and that's what makes it an all time classic to be celebrated alongside the likes of Deep Purple in Rock. Many of these pieces are timeless and I'm a big fan of Greg Lake's voice which is absolutely sensational on the classic "Take a Pebble" which lasts well over 12 minutes but somehow never manages to run away with things and is beautifully brought back on track by Emerson's keyboards.

"Lucky Man" isn't quite as effective but elsewhere there are certain hints of where the band is likely to go but in a more responsible less over the top style than on later albums. This will always be one of my favourite albums of all time and quite an achievement for an album released in 1970.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Groundbreaking Classic, 5 Mar. 2008
By 
Graham Mccarthy "gmccarthy15" (Cheshire) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
Progressive Rock music was all about pushing at the boundaries of style, structure, technique, and virtuosity. It took its influences from many sources including, classical, jazz, and even folk. In pushing the envelope, musicians often used the latest instruments, the melotron, synthesiser, and Brian Eno tape loops to name three.

Emerson Lake and Palmer were later to become guilty of excess and at times they sacrificed soul and feeling for showmanship and bravado, but not on this, their first album. Their first album defined the new way forward for prog rock and this is an example of Emerson Lake and Palmer leading from the front.

`Barbarian' is an instrumental, bombastic piece based, recognisably on Allegro Barbaro by Bartok.

`Take a Pebble' is a beautiful, acoustic and considered piece written by Lake and at over 12 minutes is the longest piece on the album. Interestingly, Emerson opens the piece by strumming the strings of his grand piano. The lyrics are amongst the strongest that Lake was ever to write.

After the gentle Take a Pebble, `Knife Edge' takes up where Barbarian left off, this time however it is a song based upon Sinfonietta by Janacek and depicts a dark, rather 1984 like world.

`The Three Fates' is another instrumental piece in three movements. The first (Clotho) features Emerson on the Pipe Organ at the Royal Festival Hall and is followed by Lachesis, which is possibly one of Emerson's finest piano solo movement. Atropos is a fiendishly complicated and enjoyable piano trio, which aptly demonstrates Emerson's virtuosity, but it's more than that, it demonstrates the thought, depth and complexity that is a hallmark of Emerson's work.

`Tank' is another instrumental written to showcase the enviable talents of Carl Palmer. It has a brutal riff and is very different in style and structure to anything else on the album; it also features a two-minute drum solo. Whilst I admit that Palmer was a prodigious talent with arguably the best technique and fastest speed, but Tank is not exactly my favourite ELP piece.

The album ends with `Luck Man' pleasant enough ballade written by Lake. It is musically simplistic but interesting for two reasons. Firstly it was to become the piece that became synonymous with ELP in the US (probably much to Emerson's frustration and secondly it features the first example of a Moog Synthesiser to be used on record. We're talking 1970 here remember.

Emeson Lake and Palmer (the album) containes all that was good about prog rock. It is a coherent, collection of tracks that gel into an outstanding album and with few of the excesses that were later to plague the genre. It has no 30-minute tracks or needlessly overcomplicated arrangements and deserves a place in the rock hall of fame. I doubt we would ever have heard pieces like Dark Side of the Moon had this album not have been released. It is a vital piece of any self respecting rock fan's historical music collection. The digitally re-mastered version is a great reason to buy it again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Groundbreaking Classic, 5 Mar. 2008
By 
Graham Mccarthy "gmccarthy15" (Cheshire) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Emerson Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
Progressive Rock music was all about pushing at the boundaries of style, structure, technique, and virtuosity. It took its influences from many sources including, classical, jazz, and even folk. In pushing the envelope, musicians often used the latest instruments, the melotron, synthesiser, and Brian Eno tape loops to name three.

Emerson Lake and Palmer were later to become guilty of excess and at times they sacrificed soul and feeling for showmanship and bravado, but not on this, their first album. Their first album defined the new way forward for prog rock and this is an example of Emerson Lake and Palmer leading from the front.

`Barbarian' is an instrumental, bombastic piece based, recognisably on Allegro Barbaro by Bartok.

`Take a Pebble' is a beautiful, acoustic and considered piece written by Lake and at over 12 minutes is the longest piece on the album. Interestingly, Emerson opens the piece by strumming the strings of his grand piano. The lyrics are amongst the strongest that Lake was ever to write.

After the gentle Take a Pebble, `Knife Edge' takes up where Barbarian left off, this time however it is a song based upon Sinfonietta by Janacek and depicts a dark, rather 1984 like world.

`The Three Fates' is another instrumental piece in three movements. The first (Clotho) features Emerson on the Pipe Organ at the Royal Festival Hall and is followed by Lachesis, which is possibly one of Emerson's finest piano solo movement. Atropos is a fiendishly complicated and enjoyable piano trio, which aptly demonstrates Emerson's virtuosity, but it's more than that, it demonstrates the thought, depth and complexity that is a hallmark of Emerson's work.

`Tank' is another instrumental written to showcase the enviable talents of Carl Palmer. It has a brutal riff and is very different in style and structure to anything else on the album; it also features a two-minute drum solo. Whilst I admit that Palmer was a prodigious talent with arguably the best technique and fastest speed, but Tank is not exactly my favourite ELP piece.

The album ends with `Luck Man' pleasant enough ballade written by Lake. It is musically simplistic but interesting for two reasons. Firstly it was to become the piece that became synonymous with ELP in the US (probably much to Emerson's frustration and secondly it features the first example of a Moog Synthesiser to be used on record. We're talking 1970 here remember.

Emeson Lake and Palmer (the album) containes all that was good about prog rock. It is a coherent, collection of tracks that gel into an outstanding album and with few of the excesses that were later to plague the genre. It has no 30-minute tracks or needlessly overcomplicated arrangements and deserves a place in the rock hall of fame. I doubt we would ever have heard pieces like Dark Side of the Moon had this album not have been released. It is a vital piece of any self respecting rock fan's historical music collection. The digitally re-mastered version is a great reason to buy it again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ELP sounds better than ever on this 2001 edition!, 4 Jun. 2001
By 
Bjrn Are Davidsen (Norway) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
What is it with these 2001 editions of ELP? Without telling about it (at least I haven't seen any commercials), ELP's back catalogue has undergone a tremendous remastering! This album, their first, sounds so good that it must be heard to be believed! If you're not familiar with ELP, or think you own albums with a wide range of styles, this should be an eye opener. One piece is furious modern classical music, another a great piano ballad, one is Bach meets metal, another pure Church organ music, one a piano trio, another intense fusion and the last one - "Lucky Man" one of those great English pop classics on accoustic guitar ending with one of the first Moog syntheziser solos ever!
If this doesn't expand ones musical horizon, nothing will;-)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ELP 1st album 3cd box set, 5 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
I write this review posthumously so to speak I was not around at the time of its release as the large amount of reviewers here were.
There is a lot of old geezers and old bands who say "ELP" were terrible and boring but there is no evidence of that here.
In fact the first 5 albums are all worth having that I have listen too, this and "Trilogy" are the best.
Seems to me "ELP" had it all back then, good looking very hip,virtuosos,some great songs,young and hungry,and from video evidence a top live band.
I would say some critics,bands,were jealous, there musicianship is frightening at times that other bands could only dream of.
The Opening track "The Barbarian"is very eerie sounding with some stunning Hammond playing,and drumming, like being in a cathedral looking through a stain glass window with bats coming out from a vault to quote a critic who like them.
Next is "Take a Pebble" this is quite beautiful music painting an aural landscape you can almost see the water and the ripples from stones thrown.
Singer "Greg Lake"has a wonderful tenor voice and a fine bass player as well,Keith Emerson must be the finest rock keyboard player I have ever heard.
Knife-edge is hard rock with some cool lyrics I am surprise no ones covered this I will have to do this with my band.
Last track "Lucky Man"is a stone fire classic,I have done this at acoustic gigs and it all ways goes down a storm,brilliantly sung by Lake.
This is a 3cd set,disc one is the original album,disc two is alternate stereo remix by "Porcupine Tree" front man "Steve Wilson"he did all the "king
Crimson"albums as well and a fine job he has made of this and "Tarkus"as well ,disc 3 is DVD audio 5.1 mixes,lovely fold-out digi pack with booklet.I like the remixes alternate mixes "Promenade"from Pictures at an exhibition is added at the intro to the 3 fates because the original beginning had no multi tracks but it works,"Luck man "out-takes are well worth having,highly recommended and all for a "Tenner"bargain get it.Can not wait for Trilogy,Well done Steve fine job,so the old saying don't believe everything you read, I looked between the line and glad I did.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars TALENT, TECHNIQUE AND SUPERB MUSIC, 6 Aug. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
Take 3 great musicians let them do what they want at the height of their musical powers and at a time when anything seemed possible and if you are lcky you get this. Keith Emerson was at this time the greatest keyboard player in rock music bar none not only on the Hmmond organ but also on the grand piano. I never tire of listening to The 3 Fates, Take a Pebble and The Barbarian where Emerson shows what a true talent he had. Carl Palmer's drumming astounding for someone just 20 he was so fast and precise and even supplied Tank, filler, perhaps? but an exercise in precision and still superb to listen to. Greg Lake's voice and bass enhance this music often said to be the weak link of the 3 I think he is more likely the magic ingredient that brings it all together.
This album has rock, ballads and of course classical music.
This album was all about showing what they could do with a promise of more to come which it certainly did.
In a way its a bit like the later Works Vol 1 each showing what they could do, but preferable to that effort as they band play on all tracks TOGETHER!
Great Debut now sadly underrated as is the case with most of their output, one day surely people will remember just how good ELP were and still are to listen to = play it loud on a good system its magical.
With this version you get various version of tunes , mixes and some bonus material possibly of most interest to ELP nuts when I bought it, it wasn't that expensive but it seems prices have risen . Up to you if you go for the Bells and Whistles version but make sure you get at least one version of this album as you'll listen to it for many years to come
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A Groundbreaking Classic, 5 Mar. 2008
By 
Graham Mccarthy "gmccarthy15" (Cheshire) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Progressive Rock music was all about pushing at the boundaries of style, structure, technique, and virtuosity. It took its influences from many sources including, classical, jazz, and even folk. In pushing the envelope, musicians often used the latest instruments, the melotron, synthesiser, and Brian Eno tape loops to name three.

Emerson Lake and Palmer were later to become guilty of excess and at times they sacrificed soul and feeling for showmanship and bravado, but not on this, their first album. Their first album defined the new way forward for prog rock and this is an example of Emerson Lake and Palmer leading from the front.

`Barbarian' is an instrumental, bombastic piece based, recognisably on Allegro Barbaro by Bartok.

`Take a Pebble' is a beautiful, acoustic and considered piece written by Lake and at over 12 minutes is the longest piece on the album. Interestingly, Emerson opens the piece by strumming the strings of his grand piano. The lyrics are amongst the strongest that Lake was ever to write.

After the gentle Take a Pebble, `Knife Edge' takes up where Barbarian left off, this time however it is a song based upon Sinfonietta by Janacek and depicts a dark, rather 1984 like world.

`The Three Fates' is another instrumental piece in three movements. The first (Clotho) features Emerson on the Pipe Organ at the Royal Festival Hall and is followed by Lachesis, which is possibly one of Emerson's finest piano solo movement. Atropos is a fiendishly complicated and enjoyable piano trio, which aptly demonstrates Emerson's virtuosity, but it's more than that, it demonstrates the thought, depth and complexity that is a hallmark of Emerson's work.

`Tank' is another instrumental written to showcase the enviable talents of Carl Palmer. It has a brutal riff and is very different in style and structure to anything else on the album; it also features a two-minute drum solo. Whilst I admit that Palmer was a prodigious talent with arguably the best technique and fastest speed, but Tank is not exactly my favourite ELP piece.

The album ends with `Luck Man' pleasant enough ballade written by Lake. It is musically simplistic but interesting for two reasons. Firstly it was to become the piece that became synonymous with ELP in the US (probably much to Emerson's frustration and secondly it features the first example of a Moog Synthesiser to be used on record. We're talking 1970 here remember.

Emeson Lake and Palmer (the album) containes all that was good about prog rock. It is a coherent, collection of tracks that gel into an outstanding album and with few of the excesses that were later to plague the genre. It has no 30-minute tracks or needlessly overcomplicated arrangements and deserves a place in the rock hall of fame. I doubt we would ever have heard pieces like Dark Side of the Moon had this album not have been released. It is a vital piece of any self respecting rock fan's historical music collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THANK YOU to ELP and SONY, 31 Aug. 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
Dear people at Amazon

Please pass my on my gratitude to ELP and Sony Music for releasing ELP and Tarkus in the new 3-disc formats.
The surround mixes are stunning and the prices are amazing. An absolute must-have.

THANK YOU THANK YOU.

Oh and by the way, I will certainly be ordering ALL further ELP releases in the same format.

Bas Möllenkramer
Soesterberg
The Netherlands
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vintage ELP, 20 Sept. 2011
By 
P. Ronayne "Pablo" (Liverpool UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Emerson Lake & Palmer (Audio CD)
A super debut album from the trio that would go on to set the pace for much of the early '70s Prog Rock scene. Emerson Lake & Palmer were one of the first 'Supergroups' of the time, Emerson from The Nice and Lake from King Crimson continuing their Progressive work with the fabulous Carl Palmer on drums. Lake's vocals are excellent throughout-like a choirboy on steroids, particularly on the classical/jazz/rock 'Take a Pebble.' Emerson's keyboard work and Palmer's drumming are breathtaking with one of the first recorded drum solo's on 'Tank'.

They would go on to great things, if a little over-hyped along the way, but this album set them on their way to stardom. Groundbreaking and influential it still sounds fresh and different-imagine the effect on listeners 40 years ago!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 36 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Emerson, Lake & Palmer by Emerson, Lake & Palmer (Audio CD - 2008)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews