Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Sheep Bleat Very Effectively
These pieces were recorded in the late 1980s and have been digitally remastered for this compilation. I have already reviewed the first of the three volumes.

This second volume again comprises two full discs (both of seventy-seven minutes) and comprises poems from the period between 1888 and 1903. `Macbeth' (1888) was Strauss's first tone poem, written when he...
Published on 2 Dec 2009 by Nicholas Casley

versus
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average performances
According to my opinion, these intepretations - compared i.e. to Karajan or Bohm, are much less dynamic. Jarvi's reading brings is very damped result, with very detailed intepretation, but nearly no story-telling and ferocity, necessary for some of R. Strauss's symphonic poems. I find detailed and soft intepretation very suitable for Don Quixote and Symphonia Domestica,...
Published on 25 Dec 2004 by J. Vich


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Sheep Bleat Very Effectively, 2 Dec 2009
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Strauss: Symphonic Poems, Vol. 2 (Audio CD)
These pieces were recorded in the late 1980s and have been digitally remastered for this compilation. I have already reviewed the first of the three volumes.

This second volume again comprises two full discs (both of seventy-seven minutes) and comprises poems from the period between 1888 and 1903. `Macbeth' (1888) was Strauss's first tone poem, written when he was twenty-four years old. Whilst lacking perhaps in memorable themes, it has a Wagnerian atmosphere and intense drama.

`Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks' of 1895 has always been viewed as an orchestral showpiece from the very beginning and here Neeme Jarvi shows why. Jarvi effectively prolongs momentarily more than normal the horn's fourth note into the fifth of Till's theme.

A year later came `Also Sprach Zarathustra'. Jarvi produces an opening the concentrates more on the deep bass pre-dawn rumble than the sunrise itself, but even that is impressive. I sensed that the organ is more to the fore than usual in this interpretation. Jarvi's is a standard and competent performance. I am pleased to report he captures well the drama of the midnight bell, which always provides a benchmark for me. Again there is an emphasis on the bass; the timpani are stormy. (But I still consider Karajan's interpretation worthy of five stars.)

Two years later Strauss came up with what Michael Kennedy describes in the sleevenotes as perhaps the greatest of his tone poems, Don Quixote (1897). Not so, in my opinion, as I find the music rambling with only occasional sparks of genius. The sound quality here is though probably the best of the lot in terms of depth and clarity - the sheep bleat very effectively - perhaps due to the different recording venue.

Chronologically the last of the five poems on this set, I always thought that the `Symphonia Domestica' was best listened to in the abstract, but the more I listened, the more I became sympathetic to Strauss's intention. One cannot fault the playing and the sound is pretty good.

In my review of the first volume of this series I criticised the sound quality. I am pleased to say that this second volume is better - the sound is balanced so that the breadth of the orchestra can be heard - but one might say it is too balanced so that there is again a lack of depth. The digital remastering has ironically reduced the effectiveness of the performing sound, resulting in an almost but not quite blandness.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Average performances, 25 Dec 2004
By 
J. Vich "A. R." (Prague, Czech Republic, EUROPE) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Strauss: Symphonic Poems, Vol. 2 (Audio CD)
According to my opinion, these intepretations - compared i.e. to Karajan or Bohm, are much less dynamic. Jarvi's reading brings is very damped result, with very detailed intepretation, but nearly no story-telling and ferocity, necessary for some of R. Strauss's symphonic poems. I find detailed and soft intepretation very suitable for Don Quixote and Symphonia Domestica, but I think there are far better (more vivid and spirited) intepretations of Eulenspiegel, Macbeth, and Zarathustra (Bohm for sure, Blomstedt, Kempe probably, and Karajan sometimes - I prefer Bohm's or Blomstedt's excellent reading of most R. Strauss compositions).
Anyway, I must appreciate Jarvi's intepretation of Don Quixote once more, it is really well done.
Finally, I gave three stars, because I heard some R. Strauss pieces at the concerto recently - under maestro Blomstedt's, conducting Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, and Jarvi's results with same pieces are notably worse (although I like mr. Neeme Jarvi as conductor very very much).
This set is valuable as alternative if you already another with some of conductors written above. If this should be first (or only one) R. Strauss's recording you will own, I would recommend you going for someone esle than mr. Jarvi.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Strauss: Symphonic Poems, Vol. 2
Strauss: Symphonic Poems, Vol. 2 by Raphael Wallfisch (Audio CD - 2004)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews