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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars RACING GAME NOT
I write this review in answer to the player that has in theory played the demo and 'prefers racing games'. For one survival horror can't even be tagged alongside racing games - go play Gran Turismo 69.5 or whatever ripoff is out this time. Silent Hill: The Room is the fourth in the franchise and having FULLY played the Japanese version I can safely say it is just as...
Published on 14 Sep 2004 by Neil

versus
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Silent Hill... er... where is it?
Silent Hill 1-3 all had something in common. They were set in and around the town of Silent Hill. Silent Hill 4 has a small reference to it, but nothing actually takes place in Silent Hill.
Graphically, nothing has changed since SH2, and although there are some new themes and sounds, Akira Yamaoka hasn't done anything ground-breaking for this release.
Naturally,...
Published on 25 Oct 2004 by Experienced.tk


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars RACING GAME NOT, 14 Sep 2004
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
I write this review in answer to the player that has in theory played the demo and 'prefers racing games'. For one survival horror can't even be tagged alongside racing games - go play Gran Turismo 69.5 or whatever ripoff is out this time. Silent Hill: The Room is the fourth in the franchise and having FULLY played the Japanese version I can safely say it is just as good if not better than the previous 3 games in the series. Considering they are amongst the finest any generation of Playstation has produced this is no easy feat. There is nice branch out from the previous series with a first person mode for the apartment aspect of the game which is cool although thankfully not overused as this would perhaps put off Hill fans. The sheer fact that this series has warranted a fourth title proves the quality of the title and yet again Konami have supplied a winner.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but could be better................, 22 May 2005
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
I have played and enjoyed all the Silent Hill games since the original, and enjoyed them all. Silent Hill 4 is a game that if it came without the baggage of the name, would be regarded as an excellent addition to the genre; unfortunately, in the context of the other SH games, it falls a little short.
The back story is a little complicated, and like other reviewers I found the constant back tracking a little tiresome at times, and the opponents were definitely style over substance. On the good side, the first person view in Room 302 was a good innovention, as was the nod to the film Rear Window, and the possessions were fun!
To sum up, I enjoyed it overall, but felt it lacked that little bit of substance to make it great. Not worth the effort to play multiple times to get the extra endings, either!!
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39 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A welcome improvement from Silent Hill 3, 23 Jun 2004
By 
D-No (Hampshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
I have been playing a Japanese import of this game for about a week (haven't finshed it yet), and it is definitely as good as I had hoped. There are some nice new features - first person mode, better combat physics, plus all the usual Silent Hill hallmarks of creepy sound effects, poor lighting, never enough ammo, last gasp swipes with the lead pipe, running out of health, etc etc. Fans will know what I mean immediately!
Perhaps the biggest departure from previous versions in the series, is that the game is very loosely divided into a series of connected "missions". The main character, Henry Townsend, returns to "the room" afterward to save and refresh his health. Henry is trapped in his apartment, and a strange hole appears in his bathroom, which forms a tunnel into other "dimensions". It is through this hole that most of the game takes place, and were the typical Silent Hill monsters are waiting for Henry. Gone are the endless referencing to maps, checking locked doors, getting lost, getting lost again, and there is more emphasis on progression in the game, which I think is a welcome change.
There is however, still plenty of scope for discovery in each "level" - the usual looking for ammo, and searching for clues to unravel the overall plot, which in true unfathomable Silent Hill fashion seems to be connected with a strange cult, a very big stone, and an orphanage in the town of Silent Hill.
There are also some strong references to previous Silent Hill games, most notably the return of the Subway station level, and even a glimpse of the pink bunny rabbit soft toys from SH3. Fans of the series will love it, and I'd say it's a return to the "wet the bed scary" heights of SH2. A must purchase.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars S H: the room, 16 April 2006
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
In the considerable wake of Resident Evil 4 the arrival of another survival horror game is somewhat under-whelming. RE 4 was a revolution in a genre that was becoming increasingly outmoded, failing to take full advantage of the capabilities of the current generation of consoles. The recent Resident Evil Outbreak games demonstrate this amply. With tedious gameplay and graphics that are indistinguishable from those of its Playstation forebears they reek of a cash-in. It should come as no great surprise that the latest Silent Hill game, The Room, fails to match its zombie-infested contemporary in terms of breakthroughs. Such comparisons are inevitable, yet to say that The Room's gameplay and specifically its combat system is vastly outdone by that of RE 4 would be to miss the point.

Silent Hill's strength lies in its storytelling ability, a facet that is frequently neglected by many developers. Suguru Murakoshi's delicately woven plot sucks you into a macabre world that explores the fundamental fears of society and the darker side of humanity. In previous outings Silent Hill had used locations such as schools, hospitals and fairgrounds, normally associated with safety, well-being and even fun to accentuate the horrific reality of the infamous town. The perversion of these havens undoubtedly underpins the series' objective, to create a thoroughly unsettling and disturbing atmosphere in an otherwise familiar environment. Such paradoxes are of course common ground for the horror fan, being expertly used in the likes of The Omen, Halloween and The Exorcist to name a few.

The Room progresses this theme making your own home a prison cell, leaving you isolated and bewildered, unable to communicate with fellow residents. You play as Henry Townsend, a single man in his late twenties, living in apartment 302 in South Ashfield Heights, in the town of Ashfield not far from Silent Hill. Henry's rather solitary life had been going well until a few days ago when he began having a re-occurring nightmare. Upon waking from such a dream you find your apartment has been barricaded from within. Upon discovering a mysterious portal on the bathroom wall, you seize the chance to escape from room 302 only to emerge in a nightmarish version of the Ashfield subway. It here, although the phrase hardly seems appropriate, is where the fun begins.

As you venture further into the other world the line between reality and fantasy becomes increasingly blurred. After the frustration of unsuccessfully trying to alert your neighbours to your imprisonment your first encounter with another person should be a great relief. Upon meeting the alluring Cynthia her matter of fact statement that you are in her personal dream-world does little to assuage your fears. When you finally return to your apartment, it has at once become reassuringly familiar and peaceful, no longer a confining tomb but a peaceful haven from the other world. In fact, Room 302 not only offers the chance to save your game, but also even revitalises your health for much of the game's duration. The immediate contrast between the first-person orientation in Room 302 and the typical third-person perspective of the otherworld is critical in establishing such notions. The slightest of changes in your apartment for instance shatter the illusion of safety that could otherwise have been easily overlooked. In the eerie subways and dank prisons beyond the portal, the third person perspective develops the detached sense of reality. While this is standard fair for Silent Hill its juxtaposition with the unexpected FP view in your apartment raises some rather unwelcome questions. Are you alive and dreaming, or dead and remembering your descent into madness? If nobody can acknowledge your presence than do you cease to exist? Any game that flirts with such existentialist questions and gives you the opportunity to bludgeon two-headed mutations with a variety of blunt objects deserves high praise indeed.

For all this hyperbole though The Room is by no means without its faults. Gameplay remains stolid as the assortment of ghosts and deformed beings are often sluggish and at times just plain annoying. This is exacerbated by the lack of any truly challenging puzzles, a feature that typified previous Silent Hill outings. Indeed, the option of selecting puzzle difficulty has been removed altogether, with one that encompasses the game as a whole. Considering that The Room is most likely to appeal to those already familiar with the series this seems a strange decision. In fact the success of SH4 is largely dependent on how it stands up to its predecessors. There are indeed highlights to the game, which won't be mentioned here for obvious reasons, yet they fail to live up previous examples. In Silent Hill 3 the room with the large mirror looks insignificant at first yet quickly establishes itself as the best and worst point of the game, its only point being to mess with your head in the most disturbing manner possible.

Silent Hill 4: The Room is certainly not a game for the casual gamer looking for fast and frenzied slice of gore soaked action. Its gameplay is barely different from its Playstation prequels while its locations are familiar for all the wrong reasons. Yet from the discordant guitar on the title screen Murakoshi's latest work sucks you into a world that sickens and delights with equal measure, compelling you to see the story's conclusion. Few games can get by on the strength of their narrative alone, yet SH4: The Room does this is with the greatest of ease.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Silent Hill... er... where is it?, 25 Oct 2004
By 
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
Silent Hill 1-3 all had something in common. They were set in and around the town of Silent Hill. Silent Hill 4 has a small reference to it, but nothing actually takes place in Silent Hill.
Graphically, nothing has changed since SH2, and although there are some new themes and sounds, Akira Yamaoka hasn't done anything ground-breaking for this release.
Naturally, the 'monsters' have all changed, but I feel Tsuboyama has run out of ideas. There are a lot of 'Ringu' references in an effort to be popular, the undying ghosts are too human to be disturbing and the whole genre of 'Horror Survival' just doesn't fit with Silent Hill anymore.
The game becomes too repetetive after half-way through when you have to do each of the areas again with new objectives, and by that time, the game hasn't really done much to disturb, shock or scare you and it becomes tedious to play.
On the plus side, Silent Hill 4 has many hours of gameplay, but that's almost all it has going for it.
I read the rest of these reviews and see Silent Hill fans raving about how good it is. I'm a Silent Hill fan, but this game does not live up to the expectations I had. In my opinion, Silent Hill 3 was the best in terms of plot as it carried over a story from Silent Hill 1, and in terms of disturbing imagery, Silent Hill 2 had it covered. Silent Hill 4: The Room seems thrown together.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Silent Hill Like Never Before, 1 Jan 2005
By 
Michael Cawdrey "Codger" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
This is the 4th game in the brilliant Silent Hill series. This game is very different from the previous games. You take control of Henry, a single man who has been living in apartment 302 for two years. You start off in a 1st person view, this is
strange, a first for the series. It can be hard to get used to, but it will get better as you play more. When you are in the different levels, your view changes back, to the traditional view. This game can be quite disturbing, with grotesque imagery and other things, not for the faint hearted. After playing on the Silent Hill games since Silent Hill one, i can say that this game is one of the best in the series. I had my doubts about it after reading some internet reviews, but I really love this game. So, if you are a fan of the Silent Hill series, or games simular to the Silent Hill series, I advise that you purchase this game, money well spent on a very good game.
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32 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Soundless berg' is lacking more life than usual., 28 July 2004
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
Oh dear, take a deep breath all you Silent Hill fans because you're in for a bit of a dissapointment. I'm the bearer of bad news because Silent Hill 4: The Room is the worst in the series so far. That's not to say it's a complete disaster because if you've never played a Silent Hill game before, the tense and nervy atmosphere is sure to impress but fans of Konami's premier survival horror series may be a tad underwhelmed. You play Henry Townshend who wakes up one morning to find chains on the door of his apartment and a large hell portal in his bathroom. Once crawling through this hole he meets his neighbour Eileen who, for the first time in the Silent Hill series, can fight alongside the main character in battle on occasions. Throughout the game futher portals open up in Henrys apartment which lead him to different areas of Silent Hill. The combat and camera are both dissapointingly clumsy however, which can be frustrating when you are fighting a huge two headed monster baby. There are also ghosts in this new game, some of which are impossible to kill which leads to futher teeth-grinding. There is only one boss character in the whole of Silent Hill 4 whch is a shame as some of the boss fights in previous games were massively entertaining. Later on in the game, Henrys apartment is infected with monsters and as this is your save game hub, it is massively frustrating to lose health and potentially die after completing a dangerous and difficult mission before you have the chance to save your progress. Silent Hill 4 was made in about a year and it's clear that the team didn't have the time to convert the games promise into a worthy addition to the Silent Hill franchise. Lets just pray they take a little more time and care should there be a Silent Hill 5.
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5.0 out of 5 stars takes the game to a new level, 6 Dec 2007
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
total mayhem. scarier than the others. a new style of gameplay where you get to see alot more creepy horrors than just hear them. silent hill 4 provides a more unsettling story than the rest and pretty much sums up the links between each silent hill title. the storyline in this title is actually quite sick and very very strange. something that isnt typical in horror games or movies. the best part of the game is when it reaches night time and your apartment starts to maninfest some very strange sounds and objects. everytime you go back you dont know what to expect. the only contact with the real world is the fisheye on you chained up apartment door. even thats unsafe! i highly recommend this title for anyone who hasnt entered the realm of SH.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thumbs Up !, 2 Oct 2009
By 
Ms. Sharnah Lloyd (Telford, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
Yet another great addition to the Silent Hill franchise, i'd say the scariest yet.
The story line didn't match up to previous Silent Hill games, but it is still a must have in your collection.

Great to play with the lights off !
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68 of 87 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just as eerie as the previous Silent Hill games, 25 Feb 2004
This review is from: Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) (Video Game)
Silent Hill 4 (or ‘The Room’ as it is also known) follows a young man named Henry Townsend, who one morning discovers that he is trapped in his apartment by some sinister force that has cursed his home. A week passes, and Henry is no nearer the truth as to exactly what is in possession of his apartment, nor how to escape. That is until, in a hysterical state, he notices that a mysterious hole has appeared in his bathroom (bizarre yes, but this IS Silent Hill). With no other means of escape, he decides he has no choice but to transport himself through the hole. The producers have promised that Silent Hill 4 will match (or possibly even surpass) the level of creepiness that was present in the three previous games. It’s really not a game you want to be playing late at night.
The game contains more terrifying creatures than ever before, such as spirits that can attack through walls, individuals in wheelchairs (kitted out in bondage attire), deformed spectres, slug-like beasts, demonic wolves and misshapen torsos with two squealing baby heads. Whilst the three previous Silent Hill games tied in with each other and shared similar characters, there is a whole new set this time around, with relatively few links with its predecessors. Similarly, there will be new areas to explore, such as a hotel, prison and forest.
One scene from the preview shows an elegant Gothic-inspired room with a stylish chandelier and then, in complete contrast, decomposing bodies bursting through the walls. There is also the mist that seems to seep into every available area – enough to let the game player know that something terrifying is about to happen. It is not unusual either, for Henry to be strolling down a seemingly normal pathway only to discover a levitating body waiting to greet him at the other end.
The duration of the game will be divided between the apartment and the worlds on the other side of the portal. Whilst once again there will be a select few individuals that are able to help the hero on his quest for the sunny world he once knew, there is an overwhelming force of evil wishing him harm. With that in mind, the producers have attempted to put more emphasis on action, and there is a great variety of weapons to choose from, which are easier to access from the menu than the system of previous games. Gameplay is much more like the original Silent Hill than games two and three, with a more puzzle-orientated feel; codes to decipher and riddles to solve, that sort of thing.
The distorted, grainy black and white footage of the trailer was particularly disturbing, reminiscent of Japanese horror film Ring. The haunting lullaby-type song that is part of the soundtrack also serves to scare the gamer witless and complements the game down to a tee. The ethereal compositions, songs layered with piercing screams and pathetic whimpering (courtesy of producer and composer Akira Yamaoka) are also suitably frightening. Another point of interest is the perspective from which the game-player views the surroundings. In parts of the game where Henry is in his apartment, there is a first-person viewpoint, designed to make the player feel claustrophobic. In the worlds beyond the portal however, the viewpoint changes to a third-person perspective. Regarding the graphics however, whilst impressive, they have not improved a great deal since Silent Hill 3; most of the characters still possess the paddle-like hands and relatively simple skeletal structures. In general however, it is a hugely impressive game, and fans of the franchise will not be at all disappointed. Just remember not to play it whilst home alone - especially if you live in an apartment.
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Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2)
Silent Hill 4: The Room (PS2) by Konami (PlayStation2)
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