Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Consistently superb
I first heard the Indigo Girls on 'Rites of Passage'; the same intricately woven melodies dominate their music as much now as they did then. Combine that with glorious harmonies, country and rock flavouring and intelligent lyric writing and you have some idea how much these two incredibly creative women deserve a much wider following. Surely one of the best kept secrets...
Published on 28 Feb. 2005 by P. G. Barrett

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow burner
As an unashamed Indigo Girls addict, I have to admit to being a little disappointed by "All that We Let In". It's not that there's anything wrong with this album; it has all the usual Ray/Saliers hallmarks of beautiful acoustic-led melodies, vocal harmony to die for, and the occasional bit of astutely cutting lyrics. But for me this is the Indigo Girls in soft focus,...
Published on 16 Nov. 2004 by amboline


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Consistently superb, 28 Feb. 2005
By 
P. G. Barrett (Wokingham, Berkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: All That We Let In (Audio CD)
I first heard the Indigo Girls on 'Rites of Passage'; the same intricately woven melodies dominate their music as much now as they did then. Combine that with glorious harmonies, country and rock flavouring and intelligent lyric writing and you have some idea how much these two incredibly creative women deserve a much wider following. Surely one of the best kept secrets of the music industry in the last 20 years (despite having Michael Stipe, a fellow Georgian, singing backing vocals on one of their earliest records)?
'All that we let in' is simply more poignant, uplifting, achingly beautiful and kick-ass tunes than you can throw a stick at. 'Cordova' is a particularly haunting song, reminiscent of the 'Swamp Ophelia' period. 'Tether' is my favourite - shades of Sheryl Crow here - with excellently understated guitar work, a kind of diluted 'Go'. 'Free in you' has to be the love song of the album.
This is not directly commercial - there are no 3 minute singles in here. But if you want authentic, earthy songs combined with musical integrity, then this is certainly for you. Let it in indeed!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The failure of activism, 3 Mar. 2004
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: All That We Let In (Audio CD)
I never thought I'd not give an Indigo Girls album 5 stars. After all this is a band who could twiddle their thumbs on a record for 45 minutes and still sound good - they just don't make bad records. Amy and Emily still put on a great live show and are always willing to try new things. There are those that didn't like any of their albums since 'Swamp Ophelia'; not me. I'm impressed at the way they went from being very acoustic guitars based to embracing banjos, mandolins, and electric guitars and still sounding great. Despite much of the criticism levelled against it at the time, 'Come on now social' contains some of their best material; 'Philosophy of Loss' is a truly beautiful song.
There's nothing wrong with the songs on this album, kicks off with enthusiasm, goes through a few classy ballads (the title track is superb) and closes down with excellent tracks like 'Dairy Queen'. Maybe I should wait a few more weeks before reviewing it, but it all sounds a bit indistinct to me.
To its credit it plays better on a sunny day (some music just does!) and one does rather get the impression that Emily has gone back to making music for fun and Amy is more comfortable with her punk groove. But for years the Indigo Girls have been influenced by other great artists and yet managed to produce a sound of their own. This album sounds just a bit too much like the bands they're looking up to.
Underlying this is the fact that independent thought and moralilty expressed through activism have taken a serious battering of late. The western powers have conducted 2 major wars since 2001, the rights of gay men and women have been ridden roughshod over in the US (a point beautifully made on Melissa Etheridge's 'Tuesday morning'), and there seems to be less success in protest than there ever was. Perhaps Amy and Emily are still in recovery from this or maybe they just made this whole album sat on the veranda while chugging down beers.
For the moment buy this and lazily enjoy it on a sunny day. Let's call this a hiatus and hope that new life will flower afresh soon. We still love you girls.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 17 Feb. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: All That We Let In (Audio CD)
OK, I'm a long term Indigo Girls fan, so this review is biaised. But this is easily the best new album by any group I've heard for a year. If you're familiar with the Indigo Girls back catalogue you know what to expect - half the songs by Emily Saliers, half by Amy Ray, the former melodically complex and reflective, the latter with raw power and harder sound. Both Emily and Amy sing on all tracks and complement each other perfectly.
I heard a rumour their last album (Become You) was album of the week on radio 2 a couple of years ago. This is in part a reflection of the mellow sound they have been discovering recently, with use of keyboards, acoustic guitars, cello and mandolin, that is also found on this CD. The lyrics match politically astute comment from a feminist viewpoint with insights about love, creativity and social responsibility.
Standout tracks include the opener, Fill it Up Again, with its memorable chorus; the title track All That We Let In, with a cool ethereal sound and great use of Emily's voice; and US single Perfect World. Amy and Emily have come up with the goods yet again; this is one of those really special albums that will be on your CD player for months to come.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Quality Offering from the Indigos, 6 Mar. 2004
By 
A E Murdock (Great Easton, Leics United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: All That We Let in (Audio CD)
The Indigo Girls have been releasing albums since the late 80's - all have been consistant in quality songwriting,excellent musicianship and a profound sense of who they are and what their music is about. They've never pandered to changes of image or direction or quirky production and this, their 13th (I think) album, is no exception. It continues and enhances what the Indigos have always done - a further collection of intelligent songs, beautiful melodies and their inimitable, interweaving harmonies. Their bottom line is just voices and accoustic guitars but they explore a whole range of instruments and can certainly rock it up when needed.
The new album opens and closes with upbeat tracks 'Fill it up again' and 'Rise up' - both bounce along with catchy choruses and lively accoustic guitars. The other uptempo numbers are all written by Amy Ray, 'Heartache for Everyone' has an unusual two tone ska feel whilst 'Perfect World' opens with Amy singing over a drum beat before swelling into the chorus underlaid with a sprightly banjo, the song deals with a familiar Indigo theme - that of the individual versus global responsibility. 'Tether' has a bluesy, rocky feel reminiscent of grungy Neil Young while 'Dairy Queen' is a bold, upbeat,break up song driven along by a springy guitar and accordion.
Emily Saliers has, for over a decade now, excelled at writing heartrending, bittersweet love songs that explore the intricacies and insecurities of personal relationships. Here we are treated to four more gems on this ever changing theme, 'Free in you', 'Come on home', 'Something real' and the title track 'All that we let in' all bear the the quality Indigo hallmark ... intelligent lyrics, sweet melodies and their gorgeous, counterpointing harmonies. These songs smoulder away, then grow and grow and continue to satisfy for, literally, years. On first listen, the track that really caught my attention was 'Cordova' by Amy Ray, singing, at her richest and smokiest, a haunting song of tragedy and loss over a mesmerising piano line.
This album, like all the Indigo girls albums,is for people who like intelligent, honest songs of beauty. 'All that we let in' reveals more with each play and,like anything of quality, will gradually take up a permanent and timeless place in your consciousness.
The accompanying DVD features the girls playing an accoustic set at the Bottom Line in New York. Four songs from this album, 'Dairy Queen', 'Fill it up again', 'Come on home' and 'Perfect world' plus the classic 'Galileo' and 'Kid fears'. Two women, two voices,a couple of instruments (+ a whole audience for the choruses!) ... an excellent display of passion and fantastic musicianship - EVERYONE should know about them!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow burner, 16 Nov. 2004
By 
amboline (York, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: All That We Let In (Audio CD)
As an unashamed Indigo Girls addict, I have to admit to being a little disappointed by "All that We Let In". It's not that there's anything wrong with this album; it has all the usual Ray/Saliers hallmarks of beautiful acoustic-led melodies, vocal harmony to die for, and the occasional bit of astutely cutting lyrics. But for me this is the Indigo Girls in soft focus, lacking the vitriolic edge and understated sarcasm of their best work and sometimes veering rather too comfortably in the direction of middle age and the middle of the road.
"Fill It Up Again" is arguably their weakest album opener ever (compare it with "Go", just two albums ago, and you'd hardly think it was the same band), a jaunty country-rock-lite number which woefully undersells Ray and Saliers' talents as lyricists and musicians. Fortunately the album does pick up steam after this; the Hammond organ intro on "Heartache for Everyone" is at least original, if not really to my taste, and "Perfect World" has a flash of the political idealism of old as well as the first really singable hook lines on the album. "Tether" is the closest they get to an epic rant in the style of old favourites "Kid Fears" or "Jonas and Ezechiel" but somehow it feels alittle forced, and doesn't quite achieve what it sets out to do. The remaining songs are variable: "Come On Home" could be vintage Saliers and is one of the high points on the album, combining sweetness and sarcasm and a beautiful, under-the-skin melody, but "Cordova" is positively painful. "Rise Up" finishes on a livelier, more triumphant note, a rallying-cry to the activists who first discovered the Girls in the late 1980s and are now heading with them (and me!) into middle age, and provides a satisfying end to the album and a welcome sense that Ray and Saliers have not yet exhausted their creative juices or their political awareness.
It's the title track which really makes this album, though, and probably rates as one of the Girls' best ever songs. A distinct slow burner, it took me three or four listens before it really began to captivate me; but stick with it, because this is a truly enchanting ballad on the mysteries of ageing, death and love, and contains some of Emily Saliers' most poignant lyrical matter yet. In a way, this song encapsulates the entire direction of the album: an older, more reflective piece than previous works, aware that the injustices of the world can't all be put to rights this minute and that sometimes it's important just to reflect and take stock of the good things that we have. But given their track record so far, I can't imagine the Indigo Girls staying quiet for too long.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

All That We Let In
All That We Let In by Indigo Girls (Audio CD - 2004)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews