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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The comeback! Sort of...
Intended, at the time, as George Harrisons comeback, 33 1/3 (his age as well as the speed of lp's) had a lot riding on it. The career of this x-Beatle had gone somewhat sour in the middle of the 1970's. Just like the other two members who hadn't broken up the Beatles, his solo career had a stellar start. Soon after however, things started going down hill. He was sued for...
Published on 10 Mar. 2008 by MORTEN AASTAD

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A promising return from the 'quiet one' - George hits 33 1/3
George Harrison was an amazing musician/songwriter who followed in the footsteps of two giants - John Lennon and Paul McCartney. George's 'All Things Must Pass' released in 1970 after the break-up of the Beatles was a revelation of a maturing talent. Whilst he never quite reached such heights again, he did produce a fairly slow flow of albums through the decades. This...
Published on 2 Mar. 2004


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The comeback! Sort of..., 10 Mar. 2008
By 
MORTEN AASTAD (Oslo Norway) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
Intended, at the time, as George Harrisons comeback, 33 1/3 (his age as well as the speed of lp's) had a lot riding on it. The career of this x-Beatle had gone somewhat sour in the middle of the 1970's. Just like the other two members who hadn't broken up the Beatles, his solo career had a stellar start. Soon after however, things started going down hill. He was sued for My Sweet Lord, he spent his momentum on the consert for Bangladesh, returned to dwindling interest with gradually less inspired recrods, his voice went during his one attempt at touring the US, and on top of all of that and divorce, he found it harder to write, and tougher to care. By the time he released Extra Texture things were supposed to look up. Free of the Apple contract, he signed with a new record company and set up his own lable, Dark Horse Records. And then he set about recording the record that would bring him back where he belonged, on top.

33 1/3 is a great piece of work. It is far more optimistic than the last offerings, and a lot more coherrent. I personally think the record is quite sweet at times, with love being a recurring theme. Some songs are supposedly leftovers from the last days of the Beatles, but is still feels like a grown up George Harrison record. The guitarwork should be mentioned, it is simply lovely. There's also humour here. This songs is a wonderful kick towards everyone who ripped into him during the 'My Sweet Lord' debacle. It shows a George who might be a bit bitter, but has taken a page from Monty Python in delivering his 'revenge'.

The production is also good, perhaps flawed by todays standards, but you know, I like the production from the 1970's. It's far more timeless than the production done on many records of the 80's, and flawed sounds more human that the production done today, where records are inundated with everything but the kitchen sink and are so loud you can't make out any nuanses.

When it came out, 33 1/3 was quite well received, but people didn't care to find out. The record did better than the last two, but George did feel dispondant about it all. The record company complained, relationships were ended, and George went to the racetrack and didn't pick up a guitar much for a couple of years.

This is my favourite George Harrison record. I find it a bit hard to explain why, but it just feels so complete.

Warmly recommended!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars George's best solo album, 23 Feb. 2007
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R. JAMES "sidjames" (walesy wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
By the time 33 1/3 was released, George barely had any credability left. Sure, his albums and singles sold respectively, but then they would do, as a former Beatle. However, every album offering since the much praised 'All Things Must Pass' had seen a steady nosedive in quality. By the time of the largely hideous 'Extra Texture' (1975) George had proved his best days were clearly behind him and were never likely to return.

So what a delight '33 1/3' was an is - an extremely listenable, focused, oftentimes sublime album. George is confident and content and produces some of his best ever tracks: "This Song" "Beautful Girl" and "Woman Don't You Cry For Me".

33 1/3 resuscitated George's solo career and proved the benchmark by which future albums would be measured.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A promising return from the 'quiet one' - George hits 33 1/3, 2 Mar. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
George Harrison was an amazing musician/songwriter who followed in the footsteps of two giants - John Lennon and Paul McCartney. George's 'All Things Must Pass' released in 1970 after the break-up of the Beatles was a revelation of a maturing talent. Whilst he never quite reached such heights again, he did produce a fairly slow flow of albums through the decades. This album was his first for a new record company and showed some promise for better things to come. I don't think George ever got the recognition he deserved and many of his musical offerings, including this, were invariably as good as those of the other ex-beatles. So sad to lose you, George.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars George's powerhouse, 24 Mar. 2004
By 
softie "gmdobbs" (wales, uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
George Harrison has rarely sounded better than he does on this, mid period reissue from his own Dark horse stable. This record, like the others in the reissues series, has been unavailable for some years which is more to do with bad judgement from the distributors than any indication on the quality contained on this shiny disc.
Things kick of with Woman don't you cry for me, a mid tempo number with some dazzling trademark slid work from the quiet one. The next two tracks continue the mellow vibe with great style before the bitter and funny This Song kicks off with George bemoaning the My Sweet Lord copyright issue.
The remainder of the album boasts a number of musical styles from the soul of Pure Smokey to the rock of Crackerbox Palace. But never once is the album boring and thirty three and a third is another in George Harrison's much underrated solo cataloug.
This is fab
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Exuberant but flawed, 11 Mar. 2005
By 
John Heaton (Budapest, Hungary) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
An improvement on 'Extra Texture' for sure. And the best thing to report on this album is that we hear much more of that unique Harrison slide guitar so absent from the previous two albums. And secondly that the album maintains a positive uplifting mood throughout, a massive contrast to the last outing. A trend that was to continue on the next album 'George Harrison' (1979). But the difference between this and the next album is in the songwriting, so consitently melodic and brilliant on the latter, and so uneven here really. In truth this is a 3 and half star album and the only reason I have rounded it up as opposed to down is because of the numerous outstanding guitar solos and because George had dragged himself out of the pit of depression he seemed to be in on the previous album 'Extra Texture'.
OK let's get to the songwriting which probably ultimately dictates how often we return to listen to an album. There is at least one outstanding track 'Learning How To Love You', a tender moving ballad which brings the album to a serene and relaxing finish. There were even two minor hit singles, quite a rarity for George post 1973: 'This Song' and 'Crackerbox Palace'. Both catchy and inoffensive on first listen. But after repeated listenings they become pretty tiresome and show themselves to be what they mostly are. Lightweight.
There is one track 'See Yourself' which had been started in 1967 in response to when McCartney admitted to the press that he had taken LSD. He didn't finish until now nine years later. No big surprise but although it's lyrically quite interesting, as a melody it's pretty mediocre. 'It's What You Value' and 'Woman Don't You Cry For Me' are both cheerful good sounding songs taken to a higher level than they might have been by the superb musicianship, especially George's superb slide on 'Woman'. As songs they are better than mediocre, but not by too much.
'True Smokey' is another meandering dirge to Smokey Robinson, like the one on 'Extra Texture'. Boring.
The other two songs which I've not discussed are probably the best, excepting 'Learning How To Love You'. 'True Love' covers the Cole Porter classic in confident style and the guitar hear makes it about ten times better than the original if you ask me. Trust no Cole Porter fan is reading this.:-). The second track 'Dear One' is a heartfelt plea and thank you to Harrison's God. Good melody, interesting arrangement and a very sincere and moving set of lyrics. Then there is 'Beautiful Girl', the first of many truly great songs George would write for his Olivia. Although this one in particular probably achieves great status on account of the wonderful slide work.
So this is a mixed bag of Harrison goodies and not so goodies. It paves the way for the triumphant next album 'George Harrison' but lacks that songwriting quality which was so obvious there but which then somewhat deserted him again on the next two albums after that one, 'Somewhere In England' (1981) and 'Gone Troppo' (1982). Another review or two!
For mood, style and guitar this is probably a 5 star album. But for songwriting it is not much better than a 3 if we're honest.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Memories, 27 Feb. 2014
By 
R.A.S. (England, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
I had watched a documentary about George Harrison and was impressed by a lot of his music. It wasn't very, 'The Beetles' nor was it like his first solo album. So I went mad and bought 5 of the CDs that had tracks I had heard on the documentary and liked because he was able to make so many different styles/genres of music. I have to admit I also bought the CDs because I respected the man. The talent he had lives on, I'm just glad he made time to make as much as he did before he passed away. Some melodic, some almost classical, some acoustic, some country-ish, some pop, some rock, some ballads.
Arrived in time specified and in perfect condition.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Return To Form For Mr H!, 14 Dec. 2014
This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
I fell in love with this album when I was about 13 (in 1992) and found it on Vinyl in a second hand shop in London. After ATMP this is one of my favourite solo albums by George.

The opening track, "Woman Don't You Cry For Me" just hooked me in on the first few notes and I knew that this was going to be a great album.

"Pure Smokey" is one song that is totally underrated, "See Yourself" gives you food for thought and "Learning How To Love You" is just beautiful.

Even though a lot of songs featured on this album are religion based it does not come across as preachy and the song "Crackerbox Palace" is fun, catchy and George at his humerous best.

This was a really good return by George who had seen less success with his previous albums like Dark Horse and Extra Texture.

As a George fanatic I can't rate this highly enough but there is enough to keep the casual listener interested, too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 33 1/3- another great release from the Dark Horse, 28 Sept. 2004
This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
This is an interesting album with some great cuts on it. The Harrison trademark slide guitar sound is in abundance as usual and the sleeve notes taken from an interview with GH throw light on the conception of each track. The bonus track 'Tears Of The World' is outstanding and a welcome addition.
Lyrically this album maintains the high standard you would expect of Harrison and certain tracks, such as 'This Song' and 'Crackerbox Palace' see him with tongue firmly in cheek in contrast to some of the more introspective and contemplative tracks he has created. Even Eric Idle chips in a quick line in Pythonesque style during 'This Song'.
Despite being re-mastered the mix of one or two tracks seems just a tad muddy, others are crystal clear. It's not noticable enough to spoil the enjoyment of this great album though.
It's not in the league of, for example, 'Cloud 9', 'All Things Must Pass' or 'Brainwashed'in my personal opinion but it's original and enjoyable and the style is unmistakeably George.
There are some very strong tracks on here and it's a worthy addition to any Harrison fan's collection.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The long wait is over for this classic Harrison album, 15 Jan. 2004
By 
Touring Mars (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
At long last, George Harrison's 1976 solo album "Thirty Three And 1/3" is back out on CD! Recorded when George was 33 & 1/3 years old, this is certainly one of his most solid solo albums, and for the greater part, has stood the test of time.
Stand-out tracks include the 'Abbey Road'-era "Beautiful Girl", a Harrison classic that no fan should be without. Also, "This Song" is a brilliant and bitter musical response to the successful lawsuit for plagerism over "My Sweet Lord" (brought by Bright Records Ltd.) Starring Eric Idle, "This Song" comments on the fact that 'This Song has nothing Bright about it', and 'This Song came to me, unknowingly...', and begins with an archetypal 60's style bassline that 'Sounds like Sugar Pie Honey Bunch'... a musical joke that was no doubt not lost on his critics!
"See Yourself" is another great track, but the keyboard intro/refrain might be just a touch on the 70's side for some people. Another single from the album, "Crackerbox Palace" is a fun song, and boasts a real Harrison lyrical gem in it's opening line - "I was so young when I was born.."... we know what you meant George! Otherwise it's a great piece of music, even if the lyrics are quite daft.
The opening track "Woman Don't You Cry For Me" and also "It's What You Value" have aged rather less gracefully, but are still mighty listenable. For me, "Dear One" is probably the one track that has aged the most and is somewhat of an anachronism now. But with lyrics inspired by and dedicated to Parahansa Yogananda (author of "Autobiography of a Yogi"), this song is more akin to what George Harrison is best-known/loved for, and is the most meditative/reflective song on the album.
There is also two more ballad-like songs, "Pure Smokey" and "Learning How To Love You" (dedicated to Herb Alpert). Both are subtly understated moments of sublime music. For good measure, Harrison also has a go at covering the Cole Porter classic 'True Love', and produces an upbeat and worthwhile piece of music to maintain the overall balance of the album.
Although not to everyone's taste, especially since some tracks sound quite dated now, I still can't understand why this album has been kept from us for so long. This album has it's fair share of 'must-have' Harrison on it, and proves once again that there was more to this man than met the eye.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thirty Thee And 1/3, 28 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: Thirty Three And 1/3 (Audio CD)
I liked the album, the song, the musicians and George Harrison’s performance. It is essential for those who are Harrison’s fans.
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