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80 of 85 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars History in Black and White
Thomas Keneally's bestselling book was made into a movie of awesome power and emotional impact. Oskar Schindler was a Catholic war profiteer during World War II. He initially prospered because he went along with the Nazi regime and did not challenge it. But Schindler ultimately saved the lives of more than 1,000 Polish Jews by giving them jobs in his factory, which...
Published on 24 Nov 2007 by Jay

versus
95 of 105 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Five stars for the film but this boxed set is only worth 2
Important note - this review is of the boxed set contents for this limited edition release of Schindler's List and not for the film itself, which is an absolutely essential buy.
The boxed set really adds nothing to the standard release of Schindler's List on DVD, which is beautifully packaged and has some interesting extras. On top of this standard release you also...
Published on 20 April 2004 by Anthony Lynas


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Take a journey, 10 Sep 2007
By 
This film takes the viewer into a dark, hellish place. It's horror will remain with you forever. Watch, see and feel the sadism and depravity you, your family, your friends and your neighbours could have been reduced to in a different time, different place. Terrifying.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars generally worthy of its subject, as far as a film can be, 22 April 2007
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Mr. Ian A. Macfarlane "almac1975" (Fife, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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I think this film has faults but its merits are so great that it would be ungenerous to dwell on them. For me, Schindler's outburst of weeping as he leaves his 'factory' to escape from the advancing Russians is a sentimental addition - I wonder if the historical Schindler did that and suspect he did not. The clever device of the little girl in red works well, though - it is so true that the plight of an individual affects most of us far more than the equally terrible plight of nameless thousands - and the very end of the film, when it moves into colour and genuine survivors appear, is most imaginative and very, very moving - a coup de cinema. There is great skill in the way in which the times have been recreated visually, and the atmosphere of the film is about right all the way through. The central performances are very good, particularly that of Ralph Fiennes as Goetz, the appalling camp commandant. As an adjunct to this film there is a very good TV documentary from perhaps 20-25 years ago with archive film of Schindler, Goetz and other key figures and extended contrubutions from Schindler's long-suffering wife, Goetz's mistress and many Schindler 'employees' which, if still available, it's more than worth looking out for. It is a tribute to the integrity of this film that it maintains the spirit and. largely, the letter of what we learn from that documentary.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spielbergs genius superbly crafted....., 24 Jan 2002
By A Customer
Theres not much one can say about a film like this, its so real so moving and artisticly perfect that it should just be watched and absorbed. But this is a picture that needs disscussion and demands involvment from the viewer so it is best watched in a non-entertainment way but as a documentery. All schools should show this at GCSE or A level as it just so perfectly speaks for itself, it teaches and makes you question your own ways of living and presents the reality of just how cruel humans can be towards one another. I saw this at GCSE level not long ago and it has completly changed the way i see the world, see evil and the oppurtunitys for change and understanding.
The genius of speilberg here is taking such dark sensetive and disturbing subject matter and bringing light to it and making it accesible for any mature audience.
Truly a film that can change your life and indeed change the world. If its message gets through to you then thats one less bad person in the world and therefore the film has served its purpose. Schools need to show this to pupils its just so important that youngsters have the chance to see true art and learn about the triumph of good over bad. Always. Steven Spielberg...thank you.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant evocation of inhumanity, 20 May 2001
By A Customer
This film is a stunning achievement! Totally matter-of-fact in its depiction of violence and genocide, it totally skips the usual Spielbergian sentimentality (until the end) and remains a totally heartbreaking and moving masterpiece. The performances, particularly Neeson, Kingsley and of course, Fiennes, are superlative and Spielberg's grainy black and white images give it a "documentary" style which enhances its power. Simply marvellous!
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spielbergs finest moment, 30 July 2006
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S J Buck (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
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In the list of major films that Spielberg has made this is the one above all others that everyone should see.

Its the true story of Oscar Schindler, a paid up member of the Nazi party who saved the lives of around 1,100 Jews in WW2.

Liam Neeson plays Schindler brilliantly, but the whole cast are excellent. It would be unfair to pick out any one person, such as Neeson, since for example Ralph Fiennes is also brilliant as a ruthless camp commandant. I've seen the film 3 or 4 times now and its one of the few films that has brought me close to tears, as true horror of the Holocaust is brought to life.

What Schindler did shows a side of humanity that most of us will never see. At great personal risk, because he realised that people were being slaughtered, he bribed Nazi officials and ensured in the process that his factory never produced anything useful for the Nazi's. Scene after haunting scene is left etched on your memory. Perhaps for me, where Schindler hoses down the people who are packed into the trains in unbearable heat sums up the whole movie for me. He needn't of helped them, they were going to die anyway, but he did. We all know about mans inhumanity to man, but here is a demonstration of one mans great humanity. So whilst the film is very sad and emotional on one level, because of Schindlers actions the film doesn't leave you in a state of manic depression at the end!

Its a fabulous movie and at 3hours and 7mins it is long, but you will never look at your watch, its that good.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An education, 8 Feb 2004
By A Customer
As a history teacher, I use Schindler's List to try and help the pupils that I teach about understanding the Holocaust. They start off by asking why they have to watch a film in black and white, by the end of the series of lessons (over 3 weeks - its that long) they are completely engrossed.
When compared with Pearl Harbour which I also use, there isn't really any comparison. Schindler's List is a film that everyone should be at least given the oportunity to watch.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire, 19 Feb 2005
A very moving film based in the time of the Holocaust and on the entrepeuner Oskar Schindler who tried to save as many Jews as he could even though the Nazi's were watching. The film gives a sort of documentary feel as it is in black & white whilst as I have heard real footage was also used in the film from the Holocaust.
"Saving Private Ryan" followed on from this film in 1998 as another one of Steven Spielberg's adaptions on the WWII. But "Schindler's List" is not such a war movie but Speilberg trying to show us how one man can make a difference whilst the Nazi's are all powerful. Liam Neeson as Oskar Schindler was the perfect part for him, giving it all he could and helping to turn this movie into a masterpiece. A very emotional side from him nearer the end showing us how Oskar Schindler may have been a member of the Nazi party but that didn't mean he was one of them. Spielberg as always lets himself streak off through the film adding a touch of his own brilliance and focussing on the little girl in the red dress which was cleverly put into the black & white cinematography.
You will be wondering of course if a movie of such standard as this won any awards, yes it did winning seven academy awards including Best Director and Best Picture. I am sure that it was a mistake for Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley and Ralph Fiennes not to win an award but it does not matter as without them the film would not be what it is. John Williams as always contributes to the film with another one of his unforgettable scores.
As it it says in the film "The List is Life."
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomal and moving - one of the greatest., 11 May 2000
By 
Schindler's List: A Review
'Schindler's List' may be set in the Second World War but it isn't yet another gung-ho action 'Saving Private Ryan' type film. In fact, it is a wonderfully crafted documentary style piece, whose moving imagery, technical mastery and understated dialogue combine to deliver a very moving and powerful presentation of the terrible inhuman atrocities of the Holocaust.
Growing up in peacetime, in a relatively liberal country, it is hard to fully understand the horrors and discrimination that happened during the Second World War, but Schindler's List is a film that leaves us in no doubt about the scale of human suffering that occurred. The film concentrates on the true story of Oskar Schindler, a Nazi Polish businessman initially interested only in capitalizing on the circumstances by using cheap Jewish labour from the Ghetto. By the end of the film, he is transformed into a hero who lost his fortune to save over a thousand persecuted Jews and defraud the Nazis.
Liam Neeson is superb as Oskar Schindler. His immense physical stature reflects the importance of the character. He handles the change of character from businessman to humanitarian with great restraint and control so when he finally allows Schindler open emotion at the end the impact is overwhelmingly powerful.
Ben Kingsley gives a brilliant performance as Itzhak Stern, a clever Jewish accountant hired by Schindler to run his factory. Stern uses his position to employ and protect many of his fellow Jews. When Schindler finds out, he is at first disappointed but eventually actively instructs Stern to do the things that he would have frowned upon earlier. Stern recognizes Schindler's humanity and the relationship that grows between them develops subtly. They only really show their feelings when the war ends. The scene where Schindler breaks down in tears at the end because he doesn't think he has done enough and is comforted by Stern is very emotional.
The other key role is that of Ralph Fiennes, as Amonn Goeth, the Nazi in charge of the labour camp. He gives a fine performance as a stupid, brutal and unstable man who personifies the Nazi ideology. He shows no humanity towards the Jews and takes great pleasure in playing God to decide who lives and who dies, such as taking pot shots at the prisoners from his balcony, for fun.
The film would not have been such a success if not for the masterful direction, camerawork and the special effects of individual scenes. Spielberg himself lost relatives in the Holocaust and was intent on educating his audience about what happened and make us question our own views of prejudice by showing how far it can go if we let it. The film is shot in a documentary style, in black and white, with cutting techniques as would have been used at the time in the early forties to make it seem real and true to the period. He also uses actual locations, including Schindler's factory and the gates of Auschwitz, to make it look authentic. There are some very poignant moments of camerawork such as when he picks out a little girl in a red dress, one of the few bits of colour in the film. The first time we see her she is running away from the soldiers to hide, the second she is being burned at Chujowa Gorge. Spielberg clearly wants us to remember these shots. The technique speaks more eloquently than any dialogue could about how even the young and innocent were not spared.
Some plaudits must go to both Steven Zallian, who spent ten years writing the script, and got an Oscar for it, and Anna Biedrzycka, who outfitted not just the stars, but thirty thousand extras as well. (That's a lot of washing!)
There are several scenes of massacre and confusion that involve thousands of extras in the foreground, mid-ground and in our peripheral vision. These are some of the most convincing scenes of mass pandemonium and terror ever filmed. They were achieved by sending in the actors with spoken lines and a few hidden hand held cameras into the melee so the extras didn't know they were being filmed and didn't feel as if they were under pressure. The effect of all this is powerful. By allowing the audience to observe the horrors, the evil of the Holocaust really comes alive. This is a departure from Spielberg's usual style of melodrama and special effects for box office pay offs, such as his other hit of the year, 'Jurassic Park.' His personal passion for the subject shows in a restrained and sincere way.
All films are entertainment, but it would be hard to describe this film in those terms. It certainly has all the components of a great film. The acting, direction, camera work and composition are absorbing. It certainly gripped me for the entire three and a quarter hours. But, the subject is such an overwhelming one that it would be better to describe it as a historical document depicted in an entertaining way.
It is down to Spielberg's genius that he found a way of conveying his message of persecution and inhumanity to a popular audience. The film is one that every young person should see.
Tom Newton - Lewis 14 England
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving, timeless movie, 24 Nov 2005
By 
Darryl Curtis "Max" (Shepperton) - See all my reviews
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Words cannot really express the brilliance of this film. It is one of the select war movies that shows the horrible side to war. War as it should be shown, rather than glorified. The terror, the loss, the suffering. It should be compulsary viewing for every child in school. I feel I learnt more about war in this and Saving Private Ryan than I ever did reading books about it in school.
With relatives who were in Austria during the war and fled to USA and UK, this film has an even more emotional effect on me. Every time I see Schindler cry, I want to cry myself.
It's miserable and emotional uplifting at the same time. There is good in every situation, somewhere.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving story......, 2 Feb 2004
By 
J. C. Eames "Winston" (Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
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This is one of those films that I have been waiting for on DVD. In my eyes it is one of, if not the best film by Steven Spielberg. Depicting the story of one Oscar Schindler during WW2, who daringly crashes a German officers/movers evening of pleasure in order to make all the right friends for his business plans. He initially seeks to use the Jewish minority as cheap/non paid labour however this changes. As the war progresses, and Schindler learns what was happening to the Jews, he does all he feels he can do in his power to protect his work force and many others. He is hailed as a hero, however still felt that he did not do enough to help them.
With a great director, great actors and great story this is one of the films that stays with you. The use of black and white (a sometimes unpopular and off putting medium to some viewers) was both brave and genius. It makes a scene, where Schindler see's a little girl in a red coat lost in amongst the chaos of the Nazi war machine, very moving and enduring. This film deserved all the awards and nominations it recieved as in my lowly opinion it is a must own film and essential viewing.
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Schindler's List [DVD] [1994] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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