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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 31 August 2008
In my opinion this is a true classic.

I always judge an album by its opener, if its good then I will probably like the rest. This album opens with 'Of Sins and Shadows' which is a bone-crunching masterpiece full of crunching guitar riffs and a mind blowing solo. Michael Romeo's technical ability and speed is too amazing to behold.

The whole album follows on in the same fashion, fantastic technique, the interplay between guitar and keyboard work is breathtaking and sometimes inseparable to the ear. I love the classical influences especially the intro to 'Out of Ashes' and the 'Witching Hour'.

Russell Alan's vocals are heavenly. His range is immense, mind you he needs it to have any chance of matching the other musicians.

If you want your a jaw dropping moment then listen to the twenty minute masterpiece, the title track. It opens with Gregorian style chanting (always a winner for Progressive music. It then moves onto to a guitar tribute to 'The Planets'. Then it kicks off into some amazing guitar work which interplays with the keyboards and all at one hundred miles an hour. Then it slows down to some nice acoustic work........you get the picture. The song never stays the same just when you think you know whats going on they change to song entirely always to good effect.

Progressive Metal at its finest and in my experience Symphony X are untouchable in this genre.

Who do I recommend this album to.....anyone that loves well-made metal music made by fantastic muscians. I think followers of Rush, who like the stuff pre-Signals should give this a go. The riffs are meaty and will appeal to many fans of more mainstream metal, such as, Metallica.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 May 2000
Generally seen to be the best album to date produced by Symphony X. This is largely due to the awesome musical talents of the individuals - mentioning any names is unfair, but Michael Romeo and Russel Allen shine through. Russel's vocals vary from deep and guttural to screeching Dickinson/Labrie melodies. His range and variety of tone is exceptional. Michael Romeo is undoubtedly one of the unsung heros of modern guitar. His rhythm work on this album owes a great deal to Dimebag Darell of Pantera - double and triple tracked grinding riffs that really get the adrenalin pumping. However, his solos and lead playing are a superb cross between smooth,flowing Malmsteen neo-classical scales/arpegios, and tapped passages reminiscent of Vai. His whammy work is also superb - and perhaps on this album Romeo acheives the best balance and contrast of lead and rhythm I have heard to date. This album only fails in my eyes in occasional excessive use of keyboard solos - a sad and common mistake made by similar bands.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 18 April 2009
My boyfriend bought this Cd & we listened to the whole album yesterday & i loved every single track it sounded awsome. I would deffinetly buy this album for myself, it's an album i could listen to all day everyday. Some of my favourite tracks were "The eyes of medusa" & "the devine wings of tragedy" which is about 24minutes long but it's deffinetly worth listening to all the way through, the contrast of singing with the guitar solos in it are just music to my ears. Overall it's a really good album & i deffinetly recomend this to any metal fan. It's just a shame that Symphony X aren't more well known because they're a really good talented band.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 5 October 2003
this is their greatest release ever.
symphony x the new jersey metal band release this awesome third album,filled with excellent vocals by russel allen, monster guitar licks and riffs by michael romeo and awesome keys from pinella.the songs rule, every single one of them.the epic "divine wings of tragedy" is filled with operatic vocals,super fast licks ,long instrumental passages what more do ya want.
two words "buy it"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 26 November 2002
I have to say I don't go along with the comparisons with Dream Theater. True, both are superb bands with world class musicians, and both like long instrumental passages.
But Symphony X has a more "thrash" feel to them (although DT on their latest release 6 Degrees Of Inner Turbulence did come close), the vocals are of the RJ Dio school, something DT can never be accused of, and the band as a whole has a heavier feel to it.
And they are SO GOOD at what they do. Some of it is a little too heavy for me, and I probably prefer the album "V", but it is close, and people who like their metal interesting but conventional should flock to this.
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on 30 July 2004
The Divine Wing's of Tragedy is the third album of Symphony X's, and to many people it is their first really high quality album. I personally believe that the band's debut and also the second album, (The Damnation Game), are both masterpieces too, but there is certainly a higher quality of production and more imaginative realisation in TDWOT. The song writing was generally better when Thomas Miller - Symphony X's excellent bass player in their first four albums - was involved in the writing, and the album being reviewed has some well written lyrics in places, (not that I pay nearly as much attention to what is being sung as I do to the music, and particuarly the guitars seeing as I'm a guitarist). On initially hearing this album I thought that Romeo's guitar playing, and his solos in particular, were generally better than in V, though V is a more focussed album and is themed, whereas DWOT is one of Symphony X's albums where the imagination floodgates were thrown open, with a new concept for each song. Symphony X themselves are actually some of the main proponents of this album being their first 'true' album, as they opined this in more than one interview. It is true that by this album, Russell Allen had had a chance to settle into the band, though I admittedly think that his debut with the band, (The Damnation Game), was a great success in terms of his singing even though it was recorded in just a couple of days. This album is a real bestiary. There is a song with an egyptian theme, "Pharoah" (though I find this the weakest song on the album, and I think the band's "Egypt" on the album V is a lot better). There is a very neo-classical style song on the album: The Witching Hour, and this has a great atmosphere, and is surely a classic Symphony X creation. The other distinctly neo-classical song on this album is Out of the Ashes, which is another one of the weaked songs on the album alongside Pharoah, but would appeal to neo-classical fans. Of Sins and Shadows is the first song on the album and is a very catchy song with a chorus that might stay in your mind for some time. Sea of Lies and The Eyes of Medusa are heavier, though without doubt, the latter is the heaviest song on the album, (with the acception of sections of the title epic which I'll get to shortly), and is perhaps the best song on the first seven tracks of the album. The final two tracks of DWOT are important however. The first is the epic of the album, with the same name as the album, and at 20:41 it is Symphony X's longest epic song apart from 'The Odyssey' which is over 24 minutes long. I think that DWOT is the finest epic that Symphony X have ever produced though, and by a long margin. It's just an amazing song that has so many good sections in it that it's hard to recall the entire song. Even back in their debut album, Symphony X showed precocious promise with the excellent epic 'A Lesson Before Dying', but TDWOT is from a more developed band now that it is their third album, and the quality of the epic song is outstanding. It went to extremes in the next album in effect because the epic never saw the album, (Twilight in Olympus: the name of the album, and the name of the intended epic song), but actually turned into an entire album: V; and this could explain why V sounds like such a coherant opus: it all stemmed from a single epic song. So in 'only' having a 24 minute epic in their new album 'The Odyssey', Symphony X have in effect been quite conservative given their history of epics growing longer all the time. I think that there is more variety in TDWOT than in any other Symphony X epic though, including The Odyssey, (but excluding what became the album V). The album itself doesn't seem to cease being very listenable, and this song is the epitome of this really, (though the first minute or so of chanting sometimes finds itself being fast forwarded, not that it isn't worth listening to). As for the final track on the album - Canlelight Fantasia - this is one of the best emotive songs of Symphony X's, and the lyrics are excellently written by Thomas Miller, (I think though that Communion and the Oracle from V might have the edge over it however, but then again perhaps not). This album would be a good release without the final two songs, but WITH the final two songs it is a brilliant album. The band themselves tend to comment that TDWOT is their best ever album, apart from their later releases such as V and The Odyssey, which they are obviously going to say are their favourites. This is a progressive classic, and is an album in high-spirits and of great artwork.
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on 27 June 2000
When I first heard this album, I could not take it all in because there is so much happening on it. The guitars and keyboards are multi-layered and the bass is amazingly executed by Thomas Miller - carving its own journey through the music.
Though the musicianship on this record is outstanding, the mixing isn't, with the keyboards overtly quietened by the heaviness of the guitars. I'm all for heavy guitars but I like the contrast of the keyboards and you really need earphones to appreciate this properly when one shouldn't have to resort to such measures.
Russel Allen's vocals are the definite highlight of the opus. Through some of the song's long instrumental passages (e.g. THE ACCOLADE) you wait in anticipation for his vocals to lift the song into the stratospheres. His range is incredible from a Phil Anselmo / Tom Araya guttural style to the more melodic James LaBrie / Roger Waters effect.
My favourite songs on the album are "Sea of Lies" and "Out of the Ashes" for Allen's dynamic vocals. The title track has not completely won me over yet as it is very disjointed (when it comes to 20 minute epics, you can't beat "A CHANGE OF SEASONS" by Dream Theater).
I would recommend anyone who likes their prog metal with a slightly harder edge to purchase this album
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 June 2000
When I first heard this album, I could not take it all in because there is so much happening on it. The guitars and keyboards are multi-layered and the bass is amazingly executed by Thomas Miller - carving its own journey through the music.
Though the musicianship on this record is outstanding, the mixing isn't, with the keyboards overtly quietened by the heaviness of the guitars. I'm all for heavy guitars but I like the contrast of the keyboards and you really need earphones to appreciate this properly when one shouldn't have to resort to such measures.
Russel Allen's vocals are the definite highlight of the opus. Through some of the song's long instrumental passages (e.g. THE ACCOLADE) you wait in anticipation for his vocals to lift the song into the stratospheres. His range is incredible from a Phil Anselmo / Tom Araya guttural style to the more melodic James LaBrie / Roger Waters effect.
My favourite songs on the album are "Sea of Lies" and "Out of the Ashes" for Allen's dynamic vocals. The title track has not completely won me over yet as it is very disjointed (when it comes to 20 minute epics, you can't beat "A CHANGE OF SEASONS" by Dream Theater).
I would recommend anyone who likes their prog metal with a slightly harder edge to purchase this album
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 2 August 2004
The Divine Wing's of Tragedy is the third album of Symphony X's, and to many people it is their first really high quality album. I personally believe that the band's debut and also the second album, (The Damnation Game), are both masterpieces too, but there is certainly a higher quality of production and more imaginative realisation in TDWOT. The song writing was generally better when Thomas Miller - Symphony X's excellent bass player in their first four albums - was involved in the writing, and the album being reviewed has some well written lyrics in places, (not that I pay nearly as much attention to what is being sung as I do to the music, and particuarly the guitars seeing as I'm a guitarist). On initially hearing this album I thought that Romeo's guitar playing, and his solos in particular, were generally better than in V, though V is a more focussed album and is themed, whereas DWOT is one of Symphony X's albums where the imagination floodgates were thrown open, with a new concept for each song. Symphony X themselves are actually some of the main proponents of this album being their first 'true' album, as they opined this in more than one interview. It is true that by this album, Russell Allen had had a chance to settle into the band, though I admittedly think that his debut with the band, (The Damnation Game), was a great success in terms of his singing even though it was recorded in just a couple of days. This album is a real bestiary. There is a song with an egyptian theme, "Pharoah" (though I find this the weakest song on the album, and I think the band's "Egypt" on the album V is a lot better). There is a very neo-classical style song on the album: The Witching Hour, and this has a great atmosphere, and is surely a classic Symphony X creation. The other distinctly neo-classical song on this album is Out of the Ashes, which is another one of the weaked songs on the album alongside Pharoah, but would appeal to neo-classical fans. Of Sins and Shadows is the first song on the album and is a very catchy song with a chorus that might stay in your mind for some time. Sea of Lies and The Eyes of Medusa are heavier, though without doubt, the latter is the heaviest song on the album, (with the acception of sections of the title epic which I'll get to shortly), and is perhaps the best song on the first seven tracks of the album. The final two tracks of DWOT are important however. The first is the epic of the album, with the same name as the album, and at 20:41 it is Symphony X's longest epic song apart from 'The Odyssey' which is over 24 minutes long. I think that DWOT is the finest epic that Symphony X have ever produced though, and by a long margin. It's just an amazing song that has so many good sections in it that it's hard to recall the entire song. Even back in their debut album, Symphony X showed precocious promise with the excellent epic 'A Lesson Before Dying', but TDWOT is from a more developed band now that it is their third album, and the quality of the epic song is outstanding. It went to extremes in the next album in effect because the epic never saw the album, (Twilight in Olympus: the name of the album, and the name of the intended epic song), but actually turned into an entire album: V; and this could explain why V sounds like such a coherant opus: it all stemmed from a single epic song. So in 'only' having a 24 minute epic in their new album 'The Odyssey', Symphony X have in effect been quite conservative given their history of epics growing longer all the time. I think that there is more variety in TDWOT than in any other Symphony X epic though, including The Odyssey, (but excluding what became the album V). The album itself doesn't seem to cease being very listenable, and this song is the epitome of this really, (though the first minute or so of chanting sometimes finds itself being fast forwarded, not that it isn't worth listening to). As for the final track on the album - Canlelight Fantasia - this is one of the best emotive songs of Symphony X's, and the lyrics are excellently written by Thomas Miller, (I think though that Communion and the Oracle from V might have the edge over it however, but then again perhaps not). This album would be a good release without the final two songs, but WITH the final two songs it is a brilliant album. The band themselves tend to comment that TDWOT is their best ever album, apart from their later releases such as V and The Odyssey, which they are obviously going to say are their favourites. This is a progressive classic, and is an album in high-spirits and of great artwork.
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on 1 May 2015
Not their best album but still has some good tracks
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