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4.2 out of 5 stars21
4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 28 June 2006
this is thursdays third album and their most accesible but also their most profound and intelligent and meaningful,truth pours from this album,its an album that deserves praise for its ability to keep emo interesting,it isnt all lyrics about look at me,im sad and lonely,its alot more than that,the songs are just addictive.

the album opens with the frantic for the workforce drowning which rocks like a juggernaut and builds into a frenzy of anger and frustration,between rupture and rapture follows and the mood of the album changes into a more melodic tempo,division street follows and is simply beautiful,asleep in the chapel is another corker,i think you can tell how highly i rate this,there are times when you need pure metal and there are times when thursday can serve to lift your mood and this is the album to do it,an album that will never grow old.
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on 12 August 2004
Thursday - War All The Time - B0000CC7HB
A common criticism levelled at bands on their second or third album is that their sound has stagnated; their music has become merely formulaic. Apparently it is requisite for a band to reinvent their style every time they wish to release an LP. There are wonderful examples of bands moving their sound 'forward'; none of the brilliant Cave In's records sound remotely alike and Cursive's admission of Gretta Cohn (a Cellist) to their ranks was nothing short of inspirational. However some bands like Thrice have enjoyed continued critical acclaim without drastically changing their output, so it is wrong to say (as magazines such as Kerrang! did) that 'War All The Time' is a poor album because of its similarity to their previous full-length. Indeed one would surely consider it beneficial to be graced with an album reminiscent of 'Full Collapse'. It was a consistently brilliant album: 'Paris in Flames' featured spoken refrains that sounded so much like At the Drive-In, 'Cross Out The Eyes' provided a gripping rage that veered towards hardcore music and 'How Long Is The Night?' & 'Standing on the Edge of Summer' were perfect sing-along dystopian anthems. The fact that 'War All The Time' is nothing revolutionary does not make it a bad album. However it isn't a great album, and despite some cracking tracks, it is hard to avoid feeling that this album is like a low-calorie version of 'Full Collapse', 'Half Collapse' if you will.
As anyone who has heard Thursday live will testify, their presence onstage is enormous. Vocalist Geoff Rickly swings his microphone like a man possessed, whilst guitars screech and drums pound. On 'Full Collapse' it really seemed like all of Thursday's vivacity had been retained in the recording process, it wasn't raw and infectious in the way some post-hardcore can be, but it was nonetheless powerful. It is difficult to say where 'War All The Time' seems to lose this vitality. With the addition of Andrew Everding, a pianist, Thursday have clearly attempted to refine their sound, but to be honest the only impact seems to be that their intensity has been diluted. This is clearly exemplified by 'This Song Brought to You By A Falling Bomb'. It is squeezed between arguably the two finest tracks on the album, and it is perfectly 'nice' with its melancholic piano and whispered vocals, but it seems totally out of place, and detracts from the indisputable brilliance of 'Asleep In The Chapel' and 'Steps Ascending'. Elsewhere Thursday seem to be lacking too, the rather trite 'Signals Over The Air' is their weakest single to date, 'M. Shepard' and 'Between Rupture and Rapture' are really rather nondescript. It was hard to pick stand-out tracks on Thursday's last album, because of the continuous quality, but here the few tracks that are of high class really stand out, suggesting perhaps that 'War All The Time' suffers from an overdose of 'filler'.
Rickly remains one of the finest lyricists in modern rock. He shares the talent of songwriters like Ben Gibbard (Death Cab For Cutie) of being able to paint the most vivid of pictures with the most laconic use of words. In 'Steps Ascending' Rickly's account of losing his best friend never ceases to sound emotive, as the Bukowski referencing album title infers, each of these tracks sound like poetry set to music, although there is nothing here to match the beauty of 'Where the Circle Ends' from their first LP, 'Waiting'. The music video for the title track was banned in the US and although Rickly doesn't admit to any anti-governmental messages in the track discussion on [...] a frustration with US politics underlies a great deal of the anger in 'War All The Time'. It's certainly refreshing to Thursday attempt social comments for a change. However Rickly's words are more suited to poetry than politics, and sound rather hollow in comparison to anything written by the likes of Frank Turner (Million Dead).
'War All The Time' is a flawed album, but don't be put off, it is still immensely listenable and well worth purchasing. If you can somehow overlook the fact that every song here sounds similar to a previously-released Thursday song, then you'll love 'War All The Time' (indeed as I at first did). However an album has to be something special to deserve five stars and 'War All The Time', as good as it is, is not special. To end with a rather Jeremy Clarkson-esque pun: their last album collapsed spectacularly, this one feels more like it has been carefully dismantled.
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on 17 September 2003
'War All The Time' is absolutely incredible from start to finish. Geoff Rickys voice is amazing. The themes of the album are suicide, fear and apocalypse.
'For The Workforce, Drowning is a great way to start off an album. It is followed by the wonderful 'Between Rupture And Rapture'. if a song does let this album down than its piano ballad 'This Song Brought To You By A Falling Bomb'.
Still, not much could beat this C.D. If you like Thrice or Funeral For A Friend then you have got to buy this because you'll absolutely love it. More serious than a hamster.
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on 12 December 2003
Full collapse was and still is amazing! War all the time is musically sound and boasts some great songs like the title track and Signals over the air but the rest of the album fails to engage. Some of the lyrics conjures some beautiful images as the lead singer has a great way with words. As a Thursday fan to any other Thursday fan i could recommend this otherwise buy "Full Collapse" or even "Waiting" both are better!
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on 4 June 2007
I cannot believe how many bad reviews this album has had, and am moved to review it simply to counteract such views.

This is a great album, nothing less than you'd expect from Thursday, arguably the best band in this genre. Fair enough it's not instantly catchy, but then that's generally the mark of the best music. Give it a few listens and the genius will shine through.

Thursday are not generic emo/screamo/whatevermo - they write about more than just being dumped, and their songs are complex and hence sometimes inaccessible at first.

But if you are new to this band, I plead with you not to be put off by the negative press. Buy this album (and also Full Collapse and A City by the Light Divided) and you will not be disappointed.
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on 11 August 2004
Thursday - War All The Time - B0000CC7HB
A common criticism levelled at bands on their second or third album is that their sound has stagnated; their music has become merely formulaic. Apparently it is requisite for a band to reinvent their style every time they wish to release an LP. There are wonderful examples of bands moving their sound 'forward'; none of the brilliant Cave In's records sound remotely alike and Cursive's admission of Gretta Cohn (a Cellist) to their ranks was nothing short of inspirational. However some bands like Thrice have enjoyed continued critical acclaim without drastically changing their output, so it is wrong to say (as magazines such as Kerrang! did) that 'War All The Time' is a poor album because of its similarity to their previous full-length. Indeed one would surely consider it beneficial to be graced with an album reminiscent of 'Full Collapse'. It was a consistently brilliant album: 'Paris in Flames' featured spoken refrains that sounded so much like At the Drive-In, 'Cross Out The Eyes' provided a gripping rage that veered towards hardcore music and 'How Long Is The Night?' & 'Standing on the Edge of Summer' were perfect sing-along dystopian anthems. The fact that 'War All The Time' is nothing revolutionary does not make it a bad album. However it isn't a great album, and despite some cracking tracks, it is hard to avoid feeling that this album is like a low-calorie version of 'Full Collapse', 'Half Collapse' if you will.
As anyone who has heard Thursday live will testify, their presence onstage is enormous. Vocalist Geoff Rickly swings his microphone like a man possessed, whilst guitars screech and drums pound. On 'Full Collapse' it really seemed like all of Thursday's vivacity had been retained in the recording process, it wasn't raw and infectious in the way some post-hardcore can be, but it was nonetheless powerful. It is difficult to say where 'War All The Time' seems to lose this vitality. With the addition of Andrew Everding, a pianist, Thursday have clearly attempted to refine their sound, but to be honest the only impact seems to be that their intensity has been diluted. This is clearly exemplified by 'This Song Bought to You By A Falling Bomb'. It is squeezed between arguably the two finest tracks on the album, and it is perfectly 'nice' with its melancholic piano and whispered vocals, but it seems totally out of place, and detracts from the indisputable brilliance of 'Asleep In The Chapel' and 'Steps Ascending'. Elsewhere Thursday seem to be lacking too, the rather trite 'Signals Over The Air' is their weakest single to date, 'M. Shepard' and 'Between Rupture and Rapture' are really rather nondescript. It was hard to pick stand-out tracks on Thursday's last album, because of the continuous quality, but here the few tracks that are of high class really stand out, suggesting perhaps that 'War All The Time' suffers from an overdose of 'filler'.
Rickly remains one of the finest lyricists in modern rock. He shares the talent of songwriters like Ben Gibbard (Death Cab For Cutie) of being able to paint the most vivid of pictures with the most laconic use of words. In 'Steps Ascending' Rickly's account of losing his best friend never ceases to sound emotive, as the Bukowski referencing album title infers, each of these tracks sound like poetry set to music, although there is nothing here to match the beauty of 'Where the Circle Ends' from their first LP, 'Waiting'. The music video for the title track was banned in the US and although Rickly doesn't admit to any anti-governmental messages in the track discussion on [...] a frustration with US politics underlies a great deal of the anger in 'War All The Time'. It's certainly refreshing to Thursday attempt social comments for a change. However Rickly's words are more suited to poetry than politics, and sound rather hollow in comparison to anything written by the likes of Frank Turner (Million Dead).
'War All The Time' is a flawed album, but don't be put off, it is still immensely listenable and well worth purchasing. If you can somehow overlook the fact that every song here sounds similar to a previously-released Thursday song, then you'll love 'War All The Time' (indeed as I at first did). However an album has to be something special to deserve five stars and 'War All The Time', as good as it is, is not special. To end with a rather Jeremy Clarkson-esque pun: their last album collapsed spectacularly, this one feels more like it has been carefully dismantled.
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on 28 August 2007
I personally love this album, it is definately the thursday album that i listen to the most, it has so much energy. The songs are emotional but not in an immature, i just broke up with girlfriend, how will i cope way. Each song has so much depth and the lyrics are well written. Just go to a site that has the thursday lyrics and read them if your having doubts about buying this album. Stand out tracks would be 'for, the worforce drowning',' asleep in the chapel', 'Steps ascending', 'War all the time' and 'tomorrow i'll be you'. Buy this album!
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on 16 September 2003
Sounding closer to their debut Waiting rather than second album Full Collapse, War All The Time is nevertheless a very powerful piece of work, covering such subject matter as alienation, depression, and political injustice in Thursday's rather unique style, using multiple vocalists and melody to good effect, far surpassing the more consumer-friendly bands in the emocore genre.
The first track, For The Workforce, Drowning, is reminiscent in many ways of Jet Black New Year (from their last release, Five Stories Falling), but recent single, Signals Over The Air, seems most indicative of the tone of the whole album, a mix of rawness and beauty.
In my opinion, Thursday are nothing less than the best band in the world at the moment. Combining lyrical honesty with innovative music, they're exactly what the music industry needs right now.
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on 10 November 2003
Thursday
War All The Time
Island
For me 'War All The Time' was always going to be one of the most eagerly awaited albums of 2003. Thursday's first two albums 'Waiting' and 'Full Collapse' were nothing short of magnificent and would both feature in a list of my all-time favourite albums, so this was always going to have a lot to live up to.
So does this album live up to its hype? Frontman Geoff Rickly recently described the album as "an art-rock album with no hooks", and whilst this may be the least immediate Thursday album yet, all of the elements that make Thursday so great are present and accounted for. The balanced interplay of Geoff and Steve's Jeckyll and Hyde vocal attack combines to perfect effect with intricately woven angular guitar work on album opener 'For The Workforce Drowning', which was featured on a split 7" with labelmates and close friends Thrice. This song looks at the dehumanisation that occurs when you are a slave to the nine-to-five routine "we'll get up and drive to work, in single file, with everyday just like the last, waiting for life to start". This theme of personal examination is one that runs deep throughout the album, with the harrowing 'Tomorrow I'll Be You' looking at how Rickly dealt with losing a close friend in a car crash.
Recording the album provided a much needed focus for the band, after a turbulent time of broken relationships and label disputes, culminating in Geoff being diagnosed with epilepsy after having blackouts on stage. Despite these troubles, the recording process helped the singer look at issues from a different perspective, and this new viewpoint allowed the songs to be written with a more positive outlook. This ability to find a silver lining in even the darkest cloud is displayed in 'Marches And Manouvers', where Geoff, after a painful break-up with a long-term girlfriend, can conclude that "after time, all this will heal".
Thursday have overcome what has been a stumbling block for many bands by successfully negotiating the tricky transition to a major label, and aptly demonstrate that you can sign to a major and still retain both your musical and artistic integrity. They have once again created an uncompromising, intelligent, passionate record, and have re-inforced their status at the forefront of the melodic hardcore scene, showing why their near perfect blend of heartfelt emotion and gut-wrenching aggression is often copied, but rarely bettered.
So does it live up to its hype? Absolutely.
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on 3 November 2003
war all the time is a great album-the lyrics are full of emotion and meaning.I really recomend this album to everyone who likes emo rock-class.
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