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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nightswimming with the Man on the Moon
REM's long-awaited 'Best of' album is a must for anyone new to the band. It combines universally acclaimed tracks like 'losing my religion' and 'everybody hurts' with some of the lesser known but equally impressive numbers such as 'e-bow the letter' and 'orange crush'.
For die hard REM fans however, most of the songs here will feel slighlty overplayed and...
Published on 17 Nov 2003 by gareth moorhouse

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The selection of songs could have been better
A compilation album from REM, from 1988 to 2003, from "Green" to "Reveal", the period when it was commercially at its peak (we can argue whether it was their artistic peak as well; to me their best period in that regard was during the last years for the IRS label). Obviously, what makes a compilation album is a great job in selecting the material. There are many great...
Published on 11 Feb 2010 by Andres C. Salama


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good But Could Be Great, 29 Dec 2003
This review is from: In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 (Audio CD)
This album has taken it's time to come out but its been worth the wait. With old classics such as Man on the moon, great beyond and imitation of life, it is mixed with new songs like the highly rated everybody hurts. This album has a great beat and rem deserve sucsess after a long while in the music industry churning out great recods noe after another. What would make this album a little bit better though is adding a few tracks with a slightly different style to the rest of the album because after a while it can get a little bit repetative and make you switch the cd player turned off as yuo get bored. But any rem fan should relish the chance to buy this good album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars R.E.M.arkable, 24 Feb 2004
This review is from: In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 (Audio CD)
Well where to start.
R.E.M have been around for many years now and have been hugely successful, manily after the release of the title "Loosing my religion" which stormed nearly every chart going at the time of release.
This CD encompasses some of R.E.M's greatest works. Timeless classics such as Night Swimming, Side winder, Orange crush and Every body hurts, makes this one of R.E.M's most desirable works of art.
R.E.M define indie rock in my opinion and the money spent on this CD is money very well spent. It's definitely and albumn which can be listened through, time and time again without getting bored of it.
A master piece.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best rock acts of the past decade, 2 Oct 2003
Looking back over fifteen years and eight records at Warner Brothers, R.E.M. deliver IN TIME, a collection of thier best songs from the most successful part of thier career. What must be stressed here is the fact that this really is a 'best of', rather than a 'greatest hits', since here the band have selected thier best songs, rather than simply throwing together all thier hit singles, which is what makes this a great introduction to the band as well as a collectable record for the hardcore fan. The songs have been carefully selected; classics such as 'Man On The Moon', 'Losing My Religion' and 'Everybody Hurts' display the most ingenious songwriting in the R.E.M. canon, while greats like 'What's The Frequency Kenneth?', 'Imitation Of Life' and 'Electrolite' offer a taste of the wide scope of sounds and sonic experiments the band have delivered over fifteen years. This truly is a balanced representation of R.E.M.'s career, profoundly affecting ballads mingled with some of the best uptempo pop songs ever written. Also, as an incentive to the fans, there are two new songs featured here, 'Bad Day', a piece of uptempo fun (a track that originates from the time of the IRS record, Lifes Rich Pageant, and eventually became It's The End Of The World As We Know It), and 'Animal', both of which emerged from sessions for their next studio album (due for release in early 2004). If that isn't enough, there is also a bonus disc, featuring a collection of rare b-sides from singles and other forgotten rarities and covers. Whether you're new to R.E.M. or if you're a fan of the band, this cannot be missed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars R.E.M.'s Warner Years Show Fantastic Talent, 4 Dec 2003
There isn't a bad song on the first of these two discs, as all their best songs (minus Find The River) are displayed for all to see.
The second disc contains some bizarre ureleased material, as well as some excellent live versions/remixes.
All in all, you can't afford not to buy this, even if it's just for the two new songs, Animal and Bad Day, which are both superb.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An introduction to an essential band, 11 Nov 2004
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This review is from: In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 (Audio CD)
This compilation is called a Best Of collection for a reason. Those looking for a comprehensive record of R.E.M.'s biggest hits have almost got it. But the glaring omission of 1991's megahit 'Shiny Happy People' is one that may cause mass discomfort for R.E.M. newcomers. It's impossible to satisfy with only 20 tracks: there's a key track from pretty much every album, from Automatic For The People's hushed finale 'Find The River' to the epic 'I'll Take The Rain' from the slightly disappointing Reveal.
But even without that song, In Time represents some of the finest work of one of the most influential bands of the last couple of decades. Even if the arrival of the seemingly invincible Coldplay suggests that R.E.M.'s time might finally be up, these three friends from Athens, Georgia can finally present to the world their exquisite brand of rock poetry in its finest form.
In Time, a chronologically jumbled collection, documents their career from 1988's glorious Green to their most recent offering, Reveal, and two tolerable new songs, 'Bad Day' (echoing 1987's anthemic 'It's The End Of The World As We Know It') and the less appealing 'Animal'. The real gems here, however, come from their 1991 and '92 albums Out Of Time and Automatic For The People: if anything, the sweeping 'Everybody Hurts' and mandolin-assisted classic 'Losing My Religion' make more of an impact today to a new generation of emo-adoring fans than they did when they were first unveiled to a jaw-dropped world. Other tracks here suggest they never lost their way with a tune: 'What's The Frequency Kenneth' (the only track from '95's unwelcome Monster) has some of the most head-scratching R.E.M. lyrics you'll ever hear, married to a beast of a tune. Collectors can also save themselves the embarrassment of paying for 16 songs they already own with a decent but only fan-appealing bonus disc of rarities, including cult R.E.M. classics like 'Pop Song 89'.
But without their stunning, politically-aware '80s work, many densely-produced tracks here suggest the R.E.M. that sold their cult souls for record deals the budget of a small country than the R.E.M. that defined the anti-mainstream, alternative culture that earned them respect from people worth having respect for. Still, however much R.E.M. sell out and disappoint fans with snobbish omissions like 'Shiny Happy People', this CD will undoubtedly be in heavy stereo rotation, however secretly, of fey ex-indie kid Smiths fans, middle-aged casual HMV-goers and the new generation of Strokes supporters alike.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 21st Century Classic, 23 July 2004
This review is from: In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 (Audio CD)
With the music industry churning out manufactured bands as if they were oxygen, it is refreshing to hear a "best of" album of the calibre of REM.
The band, now 16 years in existence, have provided timeless non-pop classics over their time.
I feel there are no bands like this anymore. Who else can come up with classics such as 'Man On The Moon', 'Nightswimming', 'What's The Frequency, Kenneth?' and (of course) 'Everybody Hurts'.
Sadly, music is not made like this anymore and this album is a must for anyone who has sense on the music scene. Yes it is Pop, but it is pop music in the true sense. It makes people happy. Music should do this.
Purchase.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Clarity, 6 Dec 2008
By 
S. orton "oatmeal" (Leicestershire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A solid collection brought to life in a high resolution 5.1 mix. The clarity is much improved in the 5.1 when compared to the stereo CD version which is also included in this digi-pack. The 5.1 mix is subtle but for me the main benefit is the 96Kz resolution.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Country Feedback live?! Gorgeous!, 28 Dec 2003
By A Customer
This compilation should be appealing to all music fans - from the R.E.M. fan to the casual fan.
‘In Time’ is not a true representation of the band’s career (which started in 1980) as it only features songs from the beginning of their Warner Bros era, and so it is effectively made up of the songs that made them famous. It is suggested that you have a look at R.E.M.’s work before this era, as people argue that their work before they became famous is better than their later work. It is also a bad representation as it features only the ‘famous’ - not hits or best – songs. This is obviously good for the casual music fan, as I suspect that the likes of ‘Man on the Moon’, ‘Losing my Religion’ and ‘Everybody Hurts’ should be appealing, and so it should be worth it for those songs. It is also a great way to introduce the band’s other songs, like ‘Orange Crush’ and ‘E-Bow the Letter’, but it is very unfortunate that the best songs aren’t here.
From an R.E.M. fan point of view, ‘In Time’ is a little disappointing in that there are some truly great songs omitted - particularly from ‘New Adventures in Hi-Fi’ (which already has a great contribution to this compilation), ‘Monster’ and ‘Green’. However, this should not affect the choice, as I believe a great majority of fans should already own all the band’s albums, and so this is no worry and should not disappoint a fan.
What is appealing to an R.E.M. fan is that there are 4 tracks that some / most fans may not have on disc - ‘The Great Beyond’, ‘Bad Day’, ‘Animal’ and ‘All the Right Friends’. ‘The Great Beyond’ is without a doubt one of the best songs the band has recorded since Bill left the band. ‘Bad Day’ and ‘Animal’ are both singles from ‘In Time’, and although they are both great songs, I think that the single version of ‘Animal’ is better than this version. ‘All the Right Friends’ is a great early song from the band, but was only recorded recently.
The second ‘Rarities and B-sides’ disc is okay, but not brilliant.
Some songs are okay, but nothing too special (‘Pop Song 89’, ‘Turn You Inside-Out’, ‘Fretless’, ‘It’s a Free World Baby’ and ‘Revolution’).
There are songs that are there for the sole reason of being rarities, as they are so pathetic that I treat them as jokes (‘Chance’ and ‘Star Me Kitten’ which has a contribution from William Burroughs). The "funky" version of ‘Drive’ is also a joke and does the original song no justice. The alternative version of ‘Leave’ is okay, but it does the original (which is one of the band’s best songs) no justice at all. It can be nice, but it’s a bad representation of the original.
The highlight of the entire two discs is the final track of the second disc. The live version of ‘Country Feedback’ is absolutely amazing. I thought the original version from ‘Out of Time’ was enough to persuade someone to buy that album... well I think the same of this version of ‘Country Feedback’. The original was gorgeous, but this version is so much better - I was taken in immediately. If anything, buy this limited edition version of ‘In Time’ for this one song!
There are many reasons why you’d want to buy this compilation, for all people. For casual music fans, it would be a travesty to miss out on the band’s work. For R.E.M. fans, it would be wrong to miss out on owning some more songs on disc.
But for all music fans, it would be a tragedy to miss out on the live version of ‘Country Feedback’.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Some very good songs but ... frustrating on so many levels, 24 Sep 2014
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This review is from: In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 (Audio CD)
REM are undoubtedly one of the greatest rock acts of the last 30 years - U2, Radiohead, Muse and the rest don't deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as REM - and they should have had something so much better than this incredibly flawed release to be remembered by.

Yes, the songs included on this CD are of course, almost without exception, excellent. HOWEVER, attempting to compile a single disc "Best Of" covering a 15 year period for a band which recorded so many memorable songs in a wide range of styles is an impossible task, and one which should never have been considered. Whatever songs were selected, thousands of people would be disappointed, frustrated and/or angry at the glaring omissions.

Just some of the tracks which you will not find here are: Shiny Happy People; It's the End of the World As We Know It; Pop Song 89; Radio Song; Near Wild Heaven; Crush With Eyeliner; Strange Currencies; Bang & Blame; Radio Free Europe... the list goes on and on. A terrible shame: a missed opportunity to create a wonderful double cd - or even a superb 3 or 4 disc set!

Next, and I'm sure not everyone will agree me here but this is a pet hate of mine - I detest seeing new material, unreleased songs, on Best Of / Greatest Hits albums. Two of the songs here fall into that category.

It's hard to see who this release is aimed at. Any real fan of the band will already own all of the songs except perhaps the two new ones (which aren't actually very good in comparison to the rest of the tracks here); and for new fans or those curious to obtain a sample of what REM are capable of, well this release doesn't come close to providing even a satisfactory overview of their output.

Finally, it is a write-protected release which means you can't copy it to your mp3 player or play it on your PC etc. To make matters worse, I find that the process of copy protecting a CD seems to have an adverse effect on the sound quality too.

In summary, there is a reason why you can pick up a copy of this for a couple of pounds... it's because that's all it is worth!

My personal recommendation would be to buy the previous "Best of"(covering the IRS singles upto 1987); Green; Out of Time; Automatic for the People; and Monster. This may sound like an expensive option but you can obtain VG quality second hand copies of each of them for £2 or less ... so for under a tenner, you really are getting the best of this great band.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent set of songs!, 9 April 2013
By 
Amazon Customer (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 (Audio CD)
I confess, I was only familiar with a couple of tracks by R.E.M before I bought this album. When I saw this compilation of their greatest hits in a second hand music store, I decided to give it a go and look into their music further. I am so glad that I did, so many of the songs on 'In Time' made my iTunes 'Top 25 Most Played' within days, and I quickly built up a collection of their studio albums.

This single CD captures the many highlights of R.E.M's internationally successful career from almost twenty years: 1988-2003, so you can expect a collection of diverse and classic tracks.

If you only knew a few of R.E.M's songs, one listen of this CD will almost surely convert you into a fan. It's rare that I would say that I was a fan of every song on a rock band's hits collection, but this is one of those rare exceptions, because there isn't one on here that I dislike. As soon as I heard 'Man On The Moon' for the first time, I kept playing it over and over, even before I listened to anymore of the hits on here. 'Everybody Hurts' is an all time classic, and has comforted me during very bad periods of my life.

I don't even think that you have to be a serious fan of rock music to be able to enjoy R.E.M. The band have so many songs that will appear to people of all musical tastes.

Great band, great music, highly recommended!
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In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003
In Time: The Best of REM 1988 - 2003 by R.E.M. (Audio CD - 2003)
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