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You Forgot It in People
Format: Audio CDChange
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on 16 March 2004
Extraordinary album this. A vast cast of musicians and influences seemingly sculpted in the studio by careful, intelligent production. Not just for indie fans, this has a universal appeal with the added lure of subtle shades of electronica (Capture The Flag), jazzy post-rock (Pacific Theme), and borderline psychedelics (Shampoo Suicide). The predominating theme lies in the richly textured MBV-meets-Dinosaur Jnr fuzz pop of tracks such as Stars And Sons, Almost Crimes and Cause = Time, which are as good as anything in the cannon of the current rock renaissance (i.e., The Strokes, Franz Ferdinand, White Stripes etc.). It is an eclectic collection that sounds more like a label compilation than the work of a particular band, without seeming to try to hard. The distorted, looped vocals of 'Anthems For a Seventeen Year-Old Girl' evoke the surreal pop of The Sleepy Jackson while 'Lover's Spit' could be a less-histrionic U2, with its stately piano and haunted vocals. Furthermore, for someone like myself who is not traditionally a indie-music fan, this is a record of remarkable detail that takes many listens to fully digest and appreciate - such is the detail in the production that never threatens to over-indulge the separate players.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 2 October 2006
I guess it's only fitting that, having already essentially kept post-rock alive in difficult times, the eastern Canadian scene would break out of that ghetto and into the larger indie-rock, er, ghetto. And it's not much of a surprise either that the result is simply epoch-making. It's no exaggeration to say that, in another 12 years, people will talk about this in the same hushed tones as they do about MBV's Loveless today - provided that they don't already, which they should.

For this second album, BSS extended from a duo to a ten-piece "official ensemble", with a further 15 or so 'guests' on various tracks. While that debut was a largely ambient affair, this covers everything. There's Tortoisey undertones on 'Pacific Theme', brushed-snare folkiness on 'I'm Still Your Fag' and string-swells on...well...everything.

The first part of the album is the more energetic - opener proper 'KC Accidental' repeats the same 8 bars with ever crazier climaxes until a brief vocal section leads into a few more goes at it. 'Stars and Sons' lopes on a motorik drum groove with barely-there vocals and FZ giving way to a feedback freakout, one of the album highlights. The first real release comes with 'Anthems to a Seventeen Year-Old Girl', whose sparse banjo-pluckings and ultra-treated vocals carry a beautiful theme into indie legend. Then it's time for standout track 'Cause = Time', which draws together all the elements for a searing, oblique social satire.

After that, the pace slows - a couple of weaker tracks meander too much for their own good. "I'm Still Your Fag" rescues things nicely, with subdued horns and guitars carrying the tragic ballad through to "Pitter Patter..." a refrain of Anthems which closes the record.

Apart from the saggy slow-mo cuts towards the end, this is an unblemished masterpiece - and frankly, I've forgiven greater sins to other bands. Buy. Right. Freakin'. Now.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2003
Broken Social Scene's You Forgot It in People arrives on these shores nearly a year after it first caused a stir in its native Canada. Since then its reputation has been gathering and gathering to become one of the most hyped records of 2003, even if it remains virtually unheard of in the UK.
A massive supergroup made up of members of various post-rock/experimental bands like the extraordinary Do Make Say Think and A Silver Mt. Zion, Broken Social Scene are a sensation. This, their second album (and very different from their instrumental first one), is made up of 13 tracks, none of which sounds like the one before it.
This album is bursting with ideas and inspiration, starting with the ambient noodling of 'Capture the Flag', then bursting into the rocking second track 'KC Accidental'. 'Star and Sons', which is next, is simply a fantastic experimental pop song, with a really catchy and uplifting riff.
In fact, what makes the many different styles coalesce into feeling like a proper album is this hands-in-the-air uplift that so many of the songs provide. Another favourite is 'Pacific Theme', which is like the best Do Make Say Think track, only more much more joyful and happy sounding.
'Anthems for a Seventeen Year Old Girl' is also exceptional; filtering a simple, repeated female vocal in a completely charming and endearing way. Fantastic pop music in the best sense - but with an experimental edge.
With this variety in mind, I'm tempted to say that there is something for everyone here - but realistically, not everybody is going to get as much out of this as I have. I don't think this is a perfect album, for all its eclecticism I think it ends a bit unsatisfactorily, and the first half is probably a bit better than the second. But if you enjoy experimental styles, but also know when to recognise great catchy songs when you hear them, then look no further - there's still time to be in on it before everyone else.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 3 March 2006
I downloaded "Looks Just Like The Sun" many years ago and always liked the song but never really got round to getting anymore off the album. Recently I saw the album at a knock-down price so a purchase was made. After two listens I realised I was an idiot for not buying it all those years ago..OK so I realised I was an idiot a long time ago but this compounded the fact. Basically it's got the lot, rolling instrumentals, solid rock and beautiful folk music. People throw out 5 star reviews on albums too often in my opinion but this is the real deal.
The first half of the album may sound stronger then the latter but I think that's intended. The album is a journey and as the album ends the music is much more relaxed and calm leaving you to fall asleep and drift away.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 6 August 2009
'You Forgot It In People' - the second album by ever-expanding Toronto collective Broken Social Scene - is probably few people's idea of the greatest record of all time. But the lasting effect it first had on my bored 16-year-old ears makes it unlikely I'll ever take it off its pedestal.

On release, it emerged from relative obscurity. Broken Social Scene had existed as a side-project between Toronto scenesters Brendan Canning and Kevin Drew, putting out the ambient Feel Good Lost in 2001. Lush and sweeping but relatively unremarkable, it laid few clues to what was to come, with nothing on the scale of the indie variety show on offer here. The pair added countless more friends to the Scene and returned with this just a year later.

Far more than a solid indie-rock record, 'You Forgot It In People' still sounds like some sort of divine compilation album, such is the range of perfectly-executed styles on offer. It's a true magnum opus, going through noisy blowouts ('Almost Crimes') to kitten-soft delicate pop tunes ('Anthems For A Seventeen-Year-Old Girl') via laid-back improv-sounding jams ('Looks Just Like The Sun').

The concept is, then, an ambitious mission statement which for many bands would end up as a pretentious, masturbatory disaster. The number of official 'band members' playing on the album - all key players in their own right on the Toronto indie-rock scene - reaches double figures. Yet it's immediately clear that the idea is to bring together people who are full of talent and ideas: check out the way the distorted guitars overlap with Brendan Canning's hypnotic bassline and joyous handclaps in 'Stars And Sons', or how Kevin Drew and Leslie Feist's voices entangle each other on 'Almost Crimes'.

What makes 'You Forgot It In People' so special is that it goes through every effort to avoid such perfect pieces falling apart. The band's attitude to production seems to be to throw everything into the melting pot, but the tightness and sense of rhythm overpowers any sense of scruffiness. They keep everything focused on even the most meandering pieces like 'Shampoo Suicide', a song so busy and experimental it sounds like frontman Kevin Drew is speaking in tongues. There's also a prevalent sexiness - seen everywhere from Emily Haines' breathy vocals on 'Anthems...' to the overt fantasising on 'I'm Still Your Fag'. The whole thing just works sublimely.

'You Fogot It In People' is by anyone's ears a masterclass in bringing together a huge variety of people and styles into a solid and somehow beautifully cohesive album. And if you were lucky enough to have such a feast cure your musical rut, it will never leave your heart.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
I bought this when it came out, for once a music magazine recommendation came up trumps and I´m writing to tell you all how BRILLIANT this is.
All the tracks are amazing and subletely different. The many musicians in this band allow them to have a go at pretty much anything they want and it´s difficult to believe that this isn´t a perfectly put together compilation album.
Basically it goes through a serious purple patch in the middle.
"Looks just like the sun," is a beautiful acoustic number, the singer´s voice is beautifully insipid. "Pacific theme," is a fine instrumental number that pulls nicely into,"Anthems for a seven year old girl," a really catchy, inventive tune. I love the woman´s lyric,"park that car, sleep on the floor, dream about me." "Course=time," is one hundred miles an hour rock and this contrasts nicely with the excellently transcendral,"lover´s spit." A cool dreary lament.
Buy this and their new album which is equally as good.
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on 18 August 2014
this is a lovely album. heard of them because of collaborations with Feist, and this album popped up on a search i did, so gave it a whirl, and very glad i did. some lovely, relaxing tunes mixed in with some livelier numbers, and instrumental pieces. If you want something beautifully crafted to indulge your ears in then this is a good start. going to try some more of theirs in the future.
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on 11 July 2014
One of the great experimental-pop records to come out of Canada, or anywhere. Life affirming. Stars and Sons is my all time fave.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 June 2012
I have loved this album, I had it when it came out and I listened to it incessantly. It had the kind of magic to it which I associated with all the great albums I have appreciated over the years. Somehow I lost it, but kept the feeling it gave me in my memory. After buying it again now I can still see what attracted me to it but the magic had fallen away. I don't know what it was because even at the time the reason I liked it was elusive. I guess I changed but the music didn't follow me, unlike that of Arcade Fire's Funeral or Cat Power's The Covers Record. I guess I forgot it in Broken Social Scene.
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 10 September 2003
There's no way in the world that a "band" pulled together from some of North America's most wilful musical dissidents should work. Yet Broken Social Scene, a collaboration between some of the Canadian art-noise rock bands at the furthest end of the spectrum from pop, have pulled out an absolute blinder here. Thirteen tracks that fizz with energy and invention, each one exploring different styles and themes. There's a debt to the art-rock stylings of Eleventh Dream Day on 'Cause=Time', a hypnotic Tortoise-like swirl of noise on "Anthems For A 17 Year Old Girl", an almost-emo sound to 'Stars And Sons'.
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