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4.6 out of 5 stars
The Charmer - The Complete Series [DVD] [1986]
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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on 14 March 2004
How wonderful to watch again this classic ITV serial from the late 1980s. And how well it has stood the test of time.
Memory sometimes plays tricks with TV programmes – we become a little starry-eyed about them, and when we get the chance to see them once more, we can be quite disappointed.
But not this time. The Charmer, for want of a better phrase, certainly retains its charm. And let's not forget – it was also quite brutal, with Nigel Havers playing that nasty but suave character, Ralph Gorse.
Wonderful performances, also, from Rosemary Leach and Fiona Fullerton, who are both captivated by the smooth-talking conman, and from Bernard Hepton, who soon sees through the deceit.
The series also delightfully and convincingly recreates the era in which it is set.
A shame, though, that the DVD release contains no extras – an interview with the leading actors recalling their involvement with the six-part series would have added a nice touch.
The Charmer is based on the book Mr Stimpson and Mr Gorse by Patrick Hamilton, whose work also includes the stage play Rope which Alfred Hitchcock was to later make into a film.
Hamilton was born in March 1904, and it's sad that in this, the centenary year of his birth, the DVD fails to contain a profile or tribute to this largely forgotten, and certainly under-rated, author.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 27 January 2008
This was an enjoyable and surprisingly startling series. Given a post watershed schedule when it was aired back in 1987 one was left to wonder what all the fuss was about as even the scene in the knocking shop was merely suggestive without being graphic. It seems that the Ralph Gorse character (played admirably by Nigel Havers) was nothing more than a wideboy with a plum in his mouth. It is only when you see Gorse tie up Clarice Manners (the object of his affection, played with little conviction by Fiona Fullerton) that you get a hint of his more sadistic side.

The contrast of the more twee and civilised mannerisms of Gorse's first victim Joan Plumleigh-Bruce (played wonderfully by Rosemary Leach) and her confidant Donald Stimpson (played equally well by Bernard Hepton) provide a nice contrast to the murkier depths that Gorse goes to in order to provide a means of support to Clarice. The tug of war between Plumleigh Bruce's forgiveness and Stimpson's suspicion tied in with Gorse's increased desperation makes this a fascinating series with a dramatic conclusion in which ultimately everyone's a loser.

I enjoyed this immensely at the time, and was willing to catch up with it again some 20 or so years later and enjoyed it as much, if not more. If it was made by ITV today they would try and squeeze it into a 2 hour special on a Sunday night, so one should appreciate the depth and quality that went into this production. Worth a look.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 26 December 2008
This top quality, six part 1987 drama is an excellent example of what happens when casting directors get it just right.
Nigel Havers, Bernard Hepton and Rosemary Leach are the intertwined trio in middle class 1939 southern England.
Havers is the superficially suave psychopathic "Charmer" of the title who gets his hooks into middle-aged, wealthy widow Leach. Hepton is the "cuckolded" self-made, successful local businessman consumed by jealousy who turns into Nemesis.
All three of these talented performers are on top form closely followed by an excellent supporting cast which includes George Baker and Judy Parfitt.
Whether you remember this highly entertaining series or not it has certainly stood the test of time and is well worth watching.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
"Not too tight, old boy," says Ralph Gorse at the end of The Charmer. We've spent nearly 312 minutes leading up to this point. They are 312 well spent minutes.

Gorse (Nigel Havers) is a charming English con man in the early Thirties. He lives by his amoral wits, seducing, enticing and working the side deals. He wants everything he isn't and everything he hasn't. Eventually he works his way up to murder. The Charmer, a wonderful Masterpiece Theater presentation now twenty years old, maintains every bit of its queasy allure, thanks in large part to Havers, to Rosemary Leach and to Bernard Hepton. Leach plays Joan Plumleigh-Bruce, a somewhat frumpy upper-middle class, snobbish Englishwoman, a widow who attracts Gorse's attention because of her property and her income. Hepton plays Donald Stimpson, a man who wears round, thick eyeglasses, has a rather silly mustache and is a property broker. He is a long-time friend and wooer of Joan, and he also fancies a marriage to her, to her income and to her property. The idea of a regular bit of the old bed springs is attractive to Stimpson, too. When Gorse meets Donald and, through him, Joan, the main pieces in this sly, malicious and self-serving game come into play.

In the course of this six-part series we will watch Gorse woo and manipulate, empty bank accounts, impregnate, cause a fire with fatal results, seduce, and murder. Following his trail like a middle-aged, self-serving angel of retribution is Donald. And Donald pulls along in his wake Joan, a woman who knows she was had and scorned, who still loves her Rafe but has Donald whispering to her that Rafe must be held accountable. Donald, of course, would like nothing better than to see Gorse brought down, partly because he detests Gorse and partly because he is sure that will be the path back to Joan's heart, bed and finances.

Is there anyone likable in this drama? Not really, and that's so satisfying. It is the ability of Gorse, Joan and Donald to ignore their real motives and fail to hide their real moral characters from us that gives us so much pleasure. By the end of the drama, Gorse, Joan and Donald each in their own way find a comeuppance that allows us to think our own upright moral characters might even be real.

Nigel Havers has a particularly tough job giving us the picture of Ralph Gorse. Havers must show us what a heel the man is, yet he also must make us see Gorse's charm. We know when Gorse is thinking up some disreputable betrayal for his own benefit. We can see how he is justifying a death. Havers also is able to show us how seductive, how pleasant, how companionable Gorse can be when he wants to. Rosemary Leach gives us a wonderful portrayal of a singularly unlikable, self-deluding woman who wants to be loved, who flutters at Gorse's attentions, who rather likes Donald's insistent courting and who thinks nothing of giving her young Irish maid condescending disdain. And last, we have Bernard Hepton, in my view one of the best of Britain's skilled character actors. With those thick glasses and that mustache, Hepton turns Donald Stimpson into a figure of slightly pompous amusement for us; that is, until we begin to realize just how resentful Stimpson is becoming, and how relentless he is in the pursuit of bringing down Gorse. Hepton turns Stimpson into a little man dangerous to underestimate, who simply won't let go.

The Charmer is murderous black comedy that is a great deal of fun, and features three outstanding performances.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Adapting a story from a book to television has always been a tricky matter. Here we have a great series from 1987 that takes the basis from the Gorse Trilogy of books by Patrick Hamilton published in the early 1950s. The series borrows mostly from the second book Mr Stimpson and Mr Gorse but the clever script brings together elements from book one and three and adds parts to create a story that in many ways is better than the books.
The series was originally transmitted in Britain in autumn 1987. It is a well produced and interesting period drama set in the 1930s. Nigel Havers plays the central role as Ralph Ernest Gorse, a seducing conman and murderer. For a while the character appears as a bit of a loveble rascal but that soon changes. Rosemary Leach is very good as Joan Plumleigh Bruce who is conned by and smitten with Gorse. Bernard Hepton plays Donald Stimpson an estate agent who is also affected by Gorse. He had been the would be beau of Plumleigh Bruce and vengefully pursues Gorse after he has conned her.
The drama is a bit different from the book but the cast and atmosphere are great and the script is excellent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Adapting a story from a book to television has always been a tricky matter. Here we have a great series from 1987 that takes the basis from theGorse Trilogy of books by Patrick Hamilton published in the early 1950s. The series borrows mostly from the second book Mr Stimpson and Mr Gorse but the clever script brings together elements from book one and three and adds parts to create a story that in many ways is better than the books.
The series was originally transmitted in Britain in autumn 1987. It is a well produced and interesting period drama set in the 1930s. Nigel Havers plays the central role as Ralph Ernest Gorse, a seducing conman and murderer. For a while the character appears as a bit of a loveble rascal but that soon changes. Rosemary Leach is very good as Joan Plumleigh Bruce who is conned by and smitten with Gorse. Bernard Hepton plays Donald Stimpson an estate agent who is also affected by Gorse. He had been the would be beau of Plumleigh Bruce and vengefully pursues Gorse after he has conned her.
The drama is a bit different from the book but the cast and atmosphere are great and the script is excellent.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 1 December 2009
I worked nights for 29 years and had never heard of this series till I saw it on tv recently.

I watched all the episodes on different channels so my image of this was completely disjointed and I didn't know if I had seen every episode.

When I opened the box and found just 2 discs I was quite disappointed.

I watched it from the beginning to the end in an evening in rapt admiration of all the cast and the story - wanting "Rolf" to get away with it and yet waiting to watch his comeuppance.

I was very sad when HE reached his end and I had to put the second disc back in its box.

If only there had been more in the original book.

No doubt I will watch it again soon.

This will be enjoyed even by non-nigel fans.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2009
I remembered watching this series when it was shown originally on television. Nigel Havers was very dashing his portrayal of the handsome but ultimately dangerous rogue was perfect casting. I enjoyed how his originally successful scheming starts to unravel and culminate in his eventual downfall. The interesting characters played excellently by Bernard Hepton and Rosemary Leach add to the intreague. Only the over the top portrayal by actress Fiona Fullerton, as the main character's love interest, minimally mars what was an excellent series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 August 2010
Does exactly what it says 'The Charmer' Based in the late 1930's and shown on TV in late 1986, shows Havers as the real cad he is, superbly acted with a great supporting actors and actresses.

Exceelent quality double complete series DVD with five hours of great watching. It's a wonder these actors et al are not all deceased, as they smoke more ciggies in an episode that you'll have ever witnessed. Nigel Havers the chain smoking Charmer. Ha Ha!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 26 April 2013
I was one of millions who watched this series when it first was shown on TV and loved it. I suddenly remembered it and to my surprise found you could buy it on Amazon.

Its still a brilliant series, but now the style of acting seems a bit artificial and formal so the series has lost some of the 'charm' (sorry, could not resist) it had when it was first shown.

Its still very entertaining though and I'm glad I bought it.
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