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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bogart Bacall Magic
Thanks to Amazon, I am able to see again now and in the future one of my favourite movies of all time.
The screen sparkles with the dialogue between Bogie and the new star Bacall 'You know how to whistle, don't you?
Just pucker up your lips and blow.' Then there's the great piano playing and singing of Hoagy Carmichael, and the wonderful Walter Brennan.
Published on 17 April 2012 by Davehutton

versus
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hemingway onscreen
An odd stop-go-stop-go screenplay, with Bogart being himself as usual, the hard man whose shell is crackable only by, in this case, Lauren Bacall. Walter Brennan is his rummy sidekick who we feel is likely to take a bullet or otherwise croak - but doesn't. He does a bang up job with this part. Dan Seymour is the loathsome Vichy French head cop who is the main enemy. Bad...
Published 17 months ago by Kilrymont


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bogart Bacall Magic, 17 April 2012
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This review is from: To Have and Have Not [1944] (DVD)
Thanks to Amazon, I am able to see again now and in the future one of my favourite movies of all time.
The screen sparkles with the dialogue between Bogie and the new star Bacall 'You know how to whistle, don't you?
Just pucker up your lips and blow.' Then there's the great piano playing and singing of Hoagy Carmichael, and the wonderful Walter Brennan.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What are you so sore about?, 8 Mar 2011
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Loosely based on Ernest Hemmingway's novel, To Have And Have Not features crisp dialogue, seamless direction from Howard Hawks and top tier acting. But be that as it may, the film is best remembered for the coupling of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, who quickly took their on screen romance out into the real world. The rest as they say is history.

The story is set in the Caribbean city of Fort de France, Martinique, shortly after the fall of France to the Germans. Harry 'Steve' Morgan (Bogart) is a world wise fishing boat captain who is wanted to do a secretive people smuggle from a nearby island for the French Resistance. Initially very reluctant, Harry has to take on the job when a series of events leave him flat broke. Also into his life comes Marie 'Slim' Browning (Bacall), an American pickpocket who has come to the island more by default than design. So with his alcoholic pal in tow {Walter Brennan} and the Gestapo breathing down his neck, Harry has a whole heap of issues suddenly making his once neutral and tranquil life explosive.

Legend has it that Hemingway & Hawks were involved in a debate one day during one of their fishing trips in Florida. The out-shot of that argument was that Hawks proclaimed he could make a winner of a movie out of what he considered was Hemingway's worst novel, To Have & Have Not. Hawks duly delivered this hugely endearing, often funny and entertaining movie that is a lesson in on screen chemistry and finely tuned writing {Jules Furthman and William Faulkner}. The similarities to Casablanca are many, so in that, this is weak by comparison. In fact dig away the buzzing like atmosphere here and you find a pretty weak plot. But in its purest escapist form the film is a triumph. Savvy, sexy and not short on suspense, To Have And Have Not holds up to its classic status. 8/10
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bacall and Bogart together are always worth seeing, 30 Jun 2002
By 
Penguin Egg (London, England) - See all my reviews
I'm not in a position to say how closely the film version of 'To Have and To Have Not' follows the Hemmingway source novel (not very much, from what I understand), but I can say that the film is an absolute gem. Bogart plays a skipper of a fishing boat. As in Casablanca, he is trapped in foreign territory belonging to Vichy France. He cares little about the political situation until his hand is forced and he throws in his lot with the Free French. He's the cynic who turns freedom fighter, and no one does this more convincingly than Bogart. Lauren Bacall is the girl whom he falls in love with and who is the unwitting reason for his conversion. Its incredible to think that this is Bacall's screen debut. She was only nineteen when she made this film, yet her performance sizzles. She oozes more sex appeal than Mae West, and yet has more class than Lana Turner. Bacall and Bogart fell in love while making this film, and it shows. The electricity they generate between the two of them could power Las Vegas for a month.
The dialogue, written by Jules Furthman and William Faulkner, is as sharp as a knife. Howard Hawkes' direction is as masterly as always. Add a good supporting cast, especially Walter Brennan as a 'rummy' and a guest appearance from the singer Hoagey Carmichael, and you have all the ingredients of a classic film, which this certainly is.
Dark Passage is hardly likely to go down as one of Bogart and Bacall's greatest celluloid efforts. Bogart is beginning to look his age. The age difference may not have been that noticeable in 'To Have and To Have Not' and 'Casablanca', but a couple of years down the line and Bogart is beginning to look like Bacall's father.
The film starts with Bogart escaping from prison. We see everything though his eyes - literally. The camera is Bogart. This carries on until half way through the film. There is a reason for this, but I won't spoil it for those who have not seen the film. Although this is quite an intriguing idea, I can't say that it works to any great effect. All it does is make you aware of the camera. Why they would want to keep their star off the screen for half the film is a mystery to me. You literally spend that half of the movie waiting for Bogart to appear. Dark Passage has a 1930s B Movie feel to it, and must have appeared dated when it was released in 1950s. Entertaining enough if you catch it on telly or can borrow a copy, but hardly classic Bogart.
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Did you Ever Get Bitten by a Dead Bee?, 18 Sep 2007
Everything is a classic these days even before anyone outside the studio has seen it, therefore the language has become debased and cheapened. These films on the other hand come from an era when film stars were actually something special and films valued the art of story telling. Sure there were strong commercial presures.

To Have and Have Not is a reworking ot the successful Casablanca theme. The ignition of the Bogart/Bacal chemistry helped that film ride above the obvious formula at work. This goes to show that great movies can be made under the mort crass attempts to cash in on a previous success.

Out of these films I guess that Dark Passage is the least well liked but I always loved the way that they avoided the complication of trying to convince us with two actors playing on character, before and after plastic surgery by only showing us the action from his point of view until the bandages came off and he was revealed as looking just like Humphrey Bogart!

How did he become a rugged sex symbol with a anme like Humphrey? I once asked a colleague this question, she was just short of retirement and very strong and serious woman. She immediately transformed into a blushing girl and said, "Yes but he really had it!". I gained an interseting insight into both my colleague and Bogart that day and they have never seemed that same since.

These are all 5 star films. I would have bought this for the recurring line in To Have & Have Not alone: "Did you ever get bitten by a dead bee?"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What are you so sore about?, 8 Mar 2011
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: To Have and Have Not [1944] (DVD)
Loosely based on Ernest Hemmingway's novel, To Have And Have Not features crisp dialogue, seamless direction from Howard Hawks and top tier acting. But be that as it may, the film is best remembered for the coupling of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, who quickly took their on screen romance out into the real world. The rest as they say is history.

The story is set in the Caribbean city of Fort de France, Martinique, shortly after the fall of France to the Germans. Harry 'Steve' Morgan (Bogart) is a world wise fishing boat captain who is wanted to do a secretive people smuggle from a nearby island for the French Resistance. Initially very reluctant, Harry has to take on the job when a series of events leave him flat broke. Also into his life comes Marie 'Slim' Browning (Bacall), an American pickpocket who has come to the island more by default than design. So with his alcoholic pal in tow {Walter Brennan} and the Gestapo breathing down his neck, Harry has a whole heap of issues suddenly making his once neutral and tranquil life explosive.

Legend has it that Hemingway & Hawks were involved in a debate one day during one of their fishing trips in Florida. The out-shot of that argument was that Hawks proclaimed he could make a winner of a movie out of what he considered was Hemingway's worst novel, To Have & Have Not. Hawks duly delivered this hugely endearing, often funny and entertaining movie that is a lesson in on screen chemistry and finely tuned writing {Jules Furthman and William Faulkner}. The similarities to Casablanca are many, so in that, this is weak by comparison. In fact dig away the buzzing like atmosphere here and you find a pretty weak plot. But in its purest escapist form the film is a triumph. Savvy, sexy and not short on suspense, To Have And Have Not holds up to its classic status. 8/10
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful movie, 14 Dec 2006
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This review is from: To Have & Have Not [DVD] [1944] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
They dont make them like this any more, never mind that it's the first screen outing for Bogart & Bacall this is a great movie. The chemistry between the two leads is awesome. It's is the story of the little guy standing up to tyranny and winning through guile and determination and in the process getting the girl. Walter Brennan is excellent as the amiable drunk side kick to Bogarts wise cracking anti hero. It is a little like Casablanca but who cares when there are actors of this quality on screen. The ensemble case is excellent, the interplay between Bogart and Bacall is scintillating. Love this movie. It has heart and warmth in its soul.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic, 16 Aug 2011
By 
Dipak Nandy (Nottingham, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: To Have and Have Not [1944] (DVD)
For aging film buffs like me, names like Orson Welles, Humphrey Bogart, Gary Cooper, Gregory Peck ... are all classics. At 75, I'm collecting this small library of DVDs to remind me of my youth before it is too late. Will today's HD colour, 3D image, oriented cinema goers like it. I doubt it. No matter: the loss is theirs. This one, based on Hemingway's classic novel of that title, is for my generation a must-have.
Dipak Nandy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "To Have And Have Not (1944) ... Bogey & Bacall ... Howard Hawks (2006)", 18 Mar 2011
By 
J. Lovins "Mr. Jim" (Missouri-USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: To Have and Have Not [1944] (DVD)
Warner Bros. Pictures presents "TO HAVE AN HAVE NOT" (1944) (106 min/B&W) -- Starring Humphrey Bogart, Walter Brennan, Lauren Bacall & Sheldon Leonard

Directed by Howard Hawks

"To Have and Have Not" is notable mainly for an electric first teaming of soon-to-be marrieds Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, and this free adaptation of a Hemingway story gives the stars plenty of time to shine. Bacall in particular steals the show with her checkered suits and her husky voice 'You know how to whistle, don't you? Put your lips together and blow.'

The interplay between Bogey and Bacall is some of the most unforced, natural acting ever to grace the big screen. And what could be sexier than Bacall's flirting before they kissed? One not to be missed.

The film works because of the great cast. Bogart does "downbeat but ultimately heroic" better than many others and he does it well here - tough, smart and morally challenged. Bacall has less of a character to speak of but she makes up for that by sheer force of personality; The two fell in love during the film and it does show on screen, with a great chemistry and real sexual tension between them - a heavy amount of classic scenes and hot moments also helps.

And then there's Walter Brennan, who takes a second-string role and turns it into a delight at every turn. He's a lush who can't string two thoughts together, and yet he sees all, knows all, and tells too much to the wrong people. And that walk! The booze, the sea, and the years, all rolled into one gait that's both wavering and seaworthy.

The great composer musician Hoagy Carmichael puts in an appearance as Cricket, the entertaining pianist at the hotel lounge. Flawlessly there are three musical numbers. Still remember Mr. Carmichael's rendition of "Hong Kong blues" that one keeps ringing in your ears forever. Two other tunes were, "Am I blue?", and a sultry rendition of his hit by Lauren Bacall, "How little We Know". Her interpretation stays with you.

BIOS:
1. Howard Hawks [aka: Howard Winchester Hawks]
Date of Birth: 30 May 1896, Goshen, Indiana
Date of Death: 26 December 1977, Palm Springs, California

2. Humphrey Bogart
Date of Birth: 25 December 1899 - New York City, New York
Date of Death: 14 January 1957 - Los Angeles, California

3. Walter Brennan [aka: Walter Andrew Brennan]
Date of Birth: 25 July 1894 - Swampscott, Massachusetts
Date of Death: 21 September 1974 - Oxnard, California

4. Lauren Bacall [aka: Betty Joan Perske]
Date of Birth: 16 September 1924 - New York City, New York
Date of Death: Still Living

Mr. Jim's Ratings:
Quality of Picture & Sound: 5 Stars
Performance: 5 Stars
Story & Screenplay: 5 Stars
Overall: 5 Stars [Original Music, Cinematography & Film Editing]

Total Time: 106 min on DVD ~ Warner Bros. Pictures ~ (07/25/2006)
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Love falls where it will, 14 Oct 2009
By 
Amazon Customer "Boo62" (Ilkeston Derbyshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
There is little doubt that of the titles collected here only 1 would really be able to stand up amongst Bogeys classics 'The Maltese falcon' & 'Casablanca'. 'Key Largo' Has the tension and acting that puts it up there with his best and it is perhaps no coincidence that he is matched line for line by the superbly overwrought & unhinged performance of Edward G Robinson as the hair triggered bad guy with a ruthless streak a mile wide.
In all of these films Bogart is, well, Bogart. Sideways smiles, casual smoker, a master with the snappy one liner, a lady killer with a downbeat and fatalistic attitude who isn't afraid to shoot but would rather cuff someone and walk away clean. It's Bogart's ability to appear as an ordinary Joe caught up in the unfolding events against his will. A casual manner that simply added charm to an actor whose looks surely should have put Hollywood out of his reach but whose effortless acting ability made him an icon.
Of the other films 'Dark passage' is something of an oddball affair with our man breaking out of prison to look into who killed his wife and then set him up for it. You don't see Bogey until about half way as he is at first only seen from the waist down and then covered in bandages after having plastic surgery to change his face. It's not until Bacall, whom he stumbles in to along the way & who helps him, unwraps his face that he takes an active role in the proceedings. There is a great scene when Bogey goes to get the plastic surgery at a back street doctors. The whole thing takes about an hour with just a scalpel and a few bandages and everything is filthy! Great stuff. I like this film as it is very quirky and Bogey & Bacall are both put under pressure by people wanting money & power over them. Not a classic by any means and the furthest from noir in the box set but worth a look.
'To have and have not' is the one everyone goes on about because it's where the two met and fell in love and true enough it's pretty clear to see they share a rare chemistry on screen. As charming as that may be though it is up against a pretty ropey script and some truly schonkey acting. Apparently Howard Hawks reckoned he could film Hemmingways worst book and he cited this as being it. Unfortunately the re-writing of the plot to place it in war torn Martinique with Bogey a sea captain roped in to helping the French escape the Vichey governments operatives and the threat of Devils island does little to improve an already thinly stretched plot. Walter Brennan hams it up horribly as Bogeys,(laughably called 'captain Morgan!),drunken old sea dog mate. Every time he's on screen the performance is cringe worthy. Nevertheless it's worth a look to see where it all began and so long as you start with this one you can relax knowing things will improve dramatically.
'The big sleep' see's Bogey back as Phillip Marlowe's gumshoe and this has some great snappy dialogue and a real noirish feel to it. For my money this is my favourite with Bacall & Bogey relaxed and firing one liners off left right & centre. The plot rattles along at quite a lick although you will need to keep alert as it twists around all over the place and in the end takes a bit of unravelling. As usual bodies begin to pile up and Bogey has to dig deeper and deeper in order to keep himself ahead of the game and Bacall alive. The dark and moody feel is classic noir as is the very down tempo plot. It's also pretty salty for it's day and has a hard edge that befits it's genre.
There are some extra's but not many. All sorts of languages are catered for and the short documentaries that are attached give a surprising amount of detail in a very short space of time so are well worth having. The cartoons may seem odd but actually give a feeling of the cinema back then and are a nice addition.
All 4 film cases state there is English & Italian for the hearing impaired but to be honest I can't confirm that as I haven't tried it out. The sound is the usual mono but is clear with the dialogue generally open and easily heard. You'll just have to crank the volume up a bit as it is fairly quiet. The picture varies with 'To have and have not' being a bit ropey, (the opening credits wobble like a cork at sea!), but for the most part the other three are pretty clear and certainly don't detract from being able to see or indeed enjoy what's going on.
With each film in its own case, a few worthwhile extras and 2 strong films, 1 lesser but still enjoyable and the other worth it for a bit of film history, this box set has a lot to recommend itself. If you love the old classics, Bogey & Bacall or noir then this is a collection worthy of buying.
The chances are if you're reading this you'll have them anyway but if you get this then make sure you invest in the superb 3 disc edition of 'The Maltese falcon' which is simply superb and the 2 disc 'Casablanca' which is also well worth your seeking out.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Likely to Live Forever Because of Its Cast, 19 Mar 2012
By 
Stephanie De Pue (Wilmington, NC USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: To Have and Have Not [1944] (DVD)
"To Have and Have Not, (1944), a sexy, rather old-fashioned and routine World War II thriller, was taken completely out of the routine, as it was the first of the four films made together by Humphrey Bogart (Casablanca [1942] [DVD]) and Lauren Bacall (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes [DVD] [1953]). That would be the mid-twentieth century pair who were, and are, still, great individual Hollywood stars, and an A-list power couple, tremendously admired for the strong stand they took while being harassed in the post-war period by the left-wing hunting (HUAC) House Un-American Activities Committee. The picture was directed by the famed Howard Hawks (The Big Sleep [1946] [DVD]). Like all the pictures of the incandescent stars, TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT, although nominally set on Martinique, in the Caribbean tropics, was made on Warner Brothers' back lots, filmed in crisp black and white.

The film supposedly resulted from a bet between Hawks and Ernest Hemingway, (Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises (Arrow Classic)) world-famous and admired American author of the book on which it's based. Hawks said he could get a good movie from Hemingway's worst book, which this was. Hawks did so, with a screenplay by another greatly honored American novelist, William Faulkner, (The Sound And The Fury (Vintage Classics)). And Jules Furthman, one of the most prolific, and well-known, screenwriters of his time, who was responsible for the screenplays of some of Hollywood's most highly regarded films, such as Mutiny On The Bounty (Special Edition) [DVD] [1962], and Nightmare Alley - Masters of Cinema series [DVD].

TO HAVE, however, is largely an effort by all concerned to remake Bogart's monster, Oscar-winning wartime smash CASABLANCA, while lacking Ingrid Bergman, and most of the earlier movie's sterling supporting cast. Like its predecessor, TO HAVE is set in the French-speaking world --Martinique-- with Vichy French and Free French at war, and it features an almost-heroic Free French fighter, and his wife.

Bogie is Henry (Steve) Morgan, hardboiled expatriate antihero who still, as in the previous film, sticks his neck out for nobody. He captains a fishing boat for hire. Walter Brennan (Red River [DVD] [1949]) plays his alcoholic first mate Eddie, who is fond of asking people "Was you ever stung by a dead bee?" and is treated with romanticizing kid gloves by all concerned; he's just the sweetest drunk. Anyway, there's a war on, World War II, to be precise, and business is slow. A customer who owes them a lot of money stiffs them. Against his better judgment, Morgan is forced to agree to transport the resistance leader and his wife to Martinique from another island.

Talented American singer-songwriter Hoagy Carmichael plays Cricket, singing piano player in the bar where Morgan passes time. The singer/composer is evidently in for Dooley Wilson, as Sam, in the earlier movie. Unfortunately, despite Carmichael's many beautiful compositions, he just doesn't hold the screen as did Wilson, nor does he have a song as evocative and evergreen as "As Time Goes By," in the earlier film. Finally, we have the breathtaking 19-year old Bacall, as Marie (Slim) Browning, lounge singer, looking for work, who's just landed on the island because she's run out of money. She's given a snazzy check suit, and some snappy dialogue. Remember "You know how to whistle, don't you?" She even sings; legend says she was dubbed by the 14-year old Andy Williams, but that's not necessarily true. All hands say her part was beefed up when the studio execs saw what was happening onscreen: Bogart and Bacall literally falling in love, shooting out sparks as they did.

Marcel Dalio, the croupier in CASABLANCA, and Sheldon Leonard, popular novelist-to-be, as Lt. Covo, round out the cast. Sid Hickox's noirish cinematography contributes greatly to this moody thriller combining romance, faraway adventure, and a macho Hemingway hero. Well, it's not CASABLANCA, but, as mentioned above, the Bogart/Bacall canon consists of but four pictures. This one is a good film, likely to live forever because of its cast, and if you want all their work, you will want this.
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