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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars bfi new refurbishment
first off this is for the BFI 3 disc 2013 version of the original 1925 print, Amazon got it wrong for a start its the original 1925 version, (black & white, 103 mins the rest of this review is from the BFI page *BFI Video proudly presents this definitive three-disc Dual Format Edition of this celebrated classic of silent film and horror cinema.
Directed by Rupert...
Published 9 months ago by chojin

versus
52 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic Silent Horror
Along with Nosferatu this is the best horror film of the silent era. The film on this DVD has been produced by David Sheppard and has really good picture quality and quite a nice score. At the moment this is the best edition of the film availble in the UK. There is also a trailer of the films 1929 rerelease and an interesting 12 minute audio essay.
So why not five...
Published on 12 Dec 2003


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52 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic Silent Horror, 12 Dec 2003
By A Customer
Along with Nosferatu this is the best horror film of the silent era. The film on this DVD has been produced by David Sheppard and has really good picture quality and quite a nice score. At the moment this is the best edition of the film availble in the UK. There is also a trailer of the films 1929 rerelease and an interesting 12 minute audio essay.
So why not five stars?.
Firstly I have deducted a star because there is an even better restoration of this film which could have been put on the DVD (By Photoplay Productions with a score by Carl Davis).
I am deducting another star because this is the 1929 re-issue with about twenty minutes of footage missing. The reason for this is that the re-issue version is the only one existing with superior picture quality. However on the American Milestone editon of this film both versions appear in the same set, so you are able to compare them. (You can choose between poor picture quality or scenes cut from the film).
This is still a worthwhile DVD to add to your collection, at least until some else releases a better region 2 edition.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars bfi new refurbishment, 7 Nov 2013
By 
first off this is for the BFI 3 disc 2013 version of the original 1925 print, Amazon got it wrong for a start its the original 1925 version, (black & white, 103 mins the rest of this review is from the BFI page *BFI Video proudly presents this definitive three-disc Dual Format Edition of this celebrated classic of silent film and horror cinema.
Directed by Rupert Julian, this lavish 1925 production launched the Hollywood Gothic style - which would become the trademark of Universal horror films.
Original prints of the film were fully tinted, with some sequences in Technicolor, and a rooftop scene using a special process that enabled the Phantom's cloak to show red against the blue night sky. This Photo play restoration carefully re-instates all these effects, and is accompanied by Carl Davis' celebrated score which draws heavily on Gounod's Faust, which is the opera being performed in the film.
Extras
* Presented in both High Definition and Standard Definition
* The original 1925 version, (black & white, 103 mins): with newly commissioned piano accompaniment by Ed Bussey
* Original 1925 trailer and 1929 sound re-issue trailer
* Reel 5 from lost 1929 sound re-issue (12 mins): the only surviving element, newly discovered in the Library of Congress archives.
* The 'man with a lantern' sequence: mysterious footage thought to have been shot for non-English speaking territories
* Lon Chaney: A Thousand Faces (2000, Kevin Brownlow, 86 mins, DVD only): Kevin Brownlow's definitive documentary on the legendary actor.
* Channel 4 Silents restoration souvenir programme (PDF)
* Fully illustrated booklet featuring new essays, review and film credits
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great presentation of a the Lon Chaney Classic, 20 Dec 2011
Having had the old Eureka version for many years, which I always thought was good, I was a bit apprehensive about spending the money on the Blu Ray. After all this is a silent film from 1929 and I would not have thought it could be improved that much. But I was wrong. Yes, the film elements show their age but the definition and clarity is superb. The technicolor sequences hand recreated look good. Not sure what the other reviewer felt was wrong with three versions of the film and numerous scores but I am more than pleased. Lovely packaging and superb content.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best edition yet of a wonderful film, 2 Jan 2014
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I had already bought the American blu-ray edition of the silent Phantom of the Opera, and was impressed by it. But the BFI edition is a BIG improvement on the American release. The 1929 version of the film is presented in the correct speed transferred to 24fps, with a glorious orchestral score by Carl Davis. Also, the 1925 version is presented on this disc in HD, and there is an extremely interesting booklet. Buy this edition, and you will have obtained the ultimate version of this film. I doubt it will be surpassed in the near future. I thoroughly enjoyed watching both the 1925 and the 1929 versions.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yet again, 6 Oct 2013
This Blu Ray has not even been released, but it has 29 reviews! When will Amazon decide to place the correct review with the correct product. Again and again I find this. Other websites like Play.com have got this sorted. It is misrepresentation of a product and very misleading. Amazon please get this sorted. Thank you.

I have put 4 stars as I know with out a doubt this will be an excellent BFI release.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An improvement over the 2003 Milestone Ultimate Edition(2003), 20 Sep 2012
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I spent several hours moving back and forth between the Blu-ray
edition and the Milestone DVD Ultimate edition (2003).
The picture clarity and the quality of the tinting
is very much improved in the Blu-ray version-the Bal Masque sequence is stunning!
However, why is the Blu-ray version presented in a 1.2:1 format,
while, according to IMDb, the film was shot in 1.33:1 ?
The extras in the Blu-ray version pale in comparison to those in the
Milestone edition. And you need a computer in order to view the
original script and the souvenir program, as they are in a pdf form!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Contains a tantalising glimpse of the 'lost' 1929 sound version., 23 April 2014
By 
Allan Broadfield (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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As Amazon still persists in mixing reviews up with wrong editions, this review is for the BFI edition. I received this DVD after one day of ordering, what a result!
Watching it, however, I can't help comparing it with the still definitive 'Milestone' Phantom disc set, as this BFI set succeeds and fails in equal proportions. I bought this mainly for the apparently only surviving reel (part 5) of the 'lost' 1929 sound release, in which the principle actors (minus Lon Chaney, as he was now working for MGM) were bought back four years later to fill out the feature so that a part talkie could be released.The section of the film this concerns is following the fall of the chandelier with Mary Philbin, looking slightly older, (it's 1929!) back in her dressing room.This alone was worth it for me. So the programme goes--
Disc 1. The Photoplay blu-ray version of the 1929 re release (silent) version-- fine, though the grain seemed now a little more apparent in HD, and the original 1925 release, as good as can be expected, considering the worn out 16mm origin. Also sound and silent trailers and Part 5 of the sound re release, plus the 'Man with the lantern' sequence, without any explanation.
Disc 2. The same things in standard DVD.
Disc 3. Documentary; Lon Chaney: A thousand faces.
What's missing for me is what's only in the 'Milestone' boxset---The excellent Scott MacQueen commentary on the Photoplay 1929 silent re release, and the wonderfully atmospheric organ score by Jon Mirsalis in the 1925 version. This BFI set had an adequate piano accompaniment in my opinion.
What a bonus if they could find the complete 1929 sound release print!
All in all? If you've got the Milestone edition, you've got this and more, (including trailers). If you want a tantalising glimpse of the 1929 sound release, however, you'll have to cough up for this one.
An excellent addition in this set is a booklet explaining it all.
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82 of 93 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Night to Forget, 25 Aug 2005
By 
Raymond Notley (Suffolk, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This DVD is issued closely following in the wake of the Lloyd Weber release - the cover graphics are derivative at first glance.The copy of the movie transferred to this DVD is lacking 25% of the original image. Being thus clipped means the titles and intertitles (this is a silent movie) are either partially missing or half seen in an annoying and increasingly irritating manner. Goodness knows the history of this copy but it is not a good print at all. The music added to the movie is a hodge podge of orchestral and instrumental snippets that neither complement nor serve to enhance the impetus of the story. Not worth buying and this is one for all movie buffs to avoid. If I am not mistaken there was also a brief sequence in early colour in this movie. Perhaps I am wrong. What a disappointment all round.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The soundtrack in the Cleopatra edition is pop music, 20 April 2008
The music in the Cleopatra edition is pop music that is inappropriate and has very little to do with the film itself. I watched the whole thing in mute because I found the music was preventing me from enjoying film.

The Special Collector's edition has a very good soundtrack by Gabriel Thibaudeau; it also includes some of the music of the opera Faust (for the scenes where Christine is performing). I just watched that version and enjoyed the film much more.

Update on my review above:
Another reviewer (M. D. Hart) made the same complaint about the music. He's also referring to the Cleopatra Edition.

I wish Amazon would allow users to give reviews for different prints/releases of the same film. I tried to write another review specifically for the Special Collector's Edition in order to give it 5 stars, but I wasn't allowed to because I'd already written this review. So I'll just say it here: Special Collector's Edition 5 Stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A superb restoration of an old classic, 11 Jun 2000
By A Customer
The 'BFI' video label has come to symbolise the seal of quality. Like their other silent film releases such as 'It' and 'The Lodger', the first thing you'll notice about 'The Phantom of the Opera' is the excellent picture quality. There has obviously been a lot of work put in to restoring this film to its best possible condition. The film is beautifully tinted in various colours throughout and it includes a scene originally shot in primitive red/green Technicolor. The fact that it's a 75 year old silent film inevitably gives it a dated feel, but it is much easier to watch than many other silents still around. Whilst the storyline does manage to hold the attention, there is also a lot of interest in just watching how silent films used to look. You also witness one of the great moments in early cinema when Mary Philbin whips off Lon Chaney's mask to reveal his hideous skeleton-like face! Credit must also go to Carl Davis who once again provides a superb soundtrack to accompany the pictures (see also BFI's video release of 'It'). I would not recommend this video to anyone not interested in silent films, but it is certainly a good place to start if you want to sample a taste of early cinema. And if you do enjoy it, why not check out other silent classics such as Clara Bow's 'It', Alfred Hitchcock's 'The Lodger' and Charlie Chaplin's 'City Lights'.
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Phantom of Opera & Phantom of Opera [DVD] [2029] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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