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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Food for the thoughtful
This film could only have been made by the French, and then only in the 1970's. It would be easy to dismiss it at first glance as a chauvinist celebration of political incorrectness; indeed, when the Americans tried to remake it in 1983 by casting Burt Reynolds in the Charles Denner role, that is exactly what it became.
However, here the story is in the hands...
Published on 17 Nov. 2005 by DocMartin

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The original is the real deal
This review is for the Burt Reynolds version. For some unknown reason, reviews of the French version have also been inserted into this page for the American remake. This film was never released in the UK so the only way to see it is via this Region 1 DVD so make sure your DVD player is multi-region. To be honest, the French version is the more entertaining of the two,...
Published on 14 May 2010 by ergoatlantis


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Food for the thoughtful, 17 Nov. 2005
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
This film could only have been made by the French, and then only in the 1970's. It would be easy to dismiss it at first glance as a chauvinist celebration of political incorrectness; indeed, when the Americans tried to remake it in 1983 by casting Burt Reynolds in the Charles Denner role, that is exactly what it became.
However, here the story is in the hands of a master. Truffaut's deft directorial touch poses myriad questions about the nature of the relationship between men and women; about love, commitment; physical attraction and sexual politics. The film begins with the funeral of Betrand Morane (Denner), attended only by women and then tells the story of his relationships with most of them. Interestingly, he really does love the women - he can't seem to help loving them. He is not a philanderer, nor is he interested in conquest or sexual gratification: the film is, in fact, strangely asexual.
He decides to write about his experiences, the book is dismissed by the male reviewers but his manuscript is accepted by the sole female with whom Morane inevitably falls in love. As the story moves forward and, in doing so, flashes back, one grows to like Morane more and more; he is a sweet, bewildered character who is also a man loved by women. This film will not be for all: if you are the Hollywood blockbuster type; if you hate subtitles; if you like your films with nice, neat endings then this is not for you. However, for lovers of the European school of whimsy, this is a must; not Truffaut's best - but even his second best is better than most.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 8 Mar. 2012
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
This film is wonderful... Nestor Almendros' work is sensational, seamless and the long-honed result of ten years hard graft in the New Wave (much of it with Truffaut). The moving camera is a joy and check out the static shots, too! Nathalie Baye is gorgeous, as well... The unrelenting honesty of the protagonist's revealed confesssion grips from the first few minutes. This is brave, fluent film-making that manages to be at once restrained (neo-Classical, even) but also supremely capricious and intimate. That is Truffaut's signature, of course... Really, really enjoyed seeing this again in this transfer. Highly recommended for fans of French and, indeed, any cinema that prizes candour.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Romantic Memoir, 31 May 2008
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Room for a View - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
Truffaut's The Man Who Loved Women could be viewed as an oblique homage to Casanova's often misinterpreted memoirs. Bertrand (Denner) is obsessed with women but not in the sense of a misogynistic chronicler of conquests. This man, like Casanova, is at the mercy of love or rather the concept of love - someone who is irresistibly drawn to the beauty of the female form (posture, fashion, speech, mannerisms etc) and the unending attraction of the company of women (he does not socialise with men). Betrand's primary motivation is the continuous seduction of women from any class, nationality or occupation. He does not revel in the transgression of society's moral absolutes and cannot conform to the contract-based monogamy of conventional gender relationships. Consequently the film centres on Bertrand's women, his relationship with his mother and his desire to document his `life history' in the form of a philosophical novel. Within this narrative framework the film exudes humour, warmth and exceptional wit. I found myself laughing out loud on many occasions: Delphine, the young Bertrand, the lingerie shop, the baby sitter etc etc. Interestingly Truffaut appears at the beginning of the film and is seen donning his cap as Bertrand glides by!!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Oozes with charm, 4 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
I saw this film at Birmingham Arts Centre when i was 19 or 20 and don't remember much about it, other than feeling envious about all these lovely French women he was loving. And how they all seemed to fall easily into his lap, loving him up too. Why can't i have his irresistible seductive charm (i was probably wondered at the time)

Watching now i can see its still a charming and sweet film. Charles Denner is sweet and charming, almost like a little boy lost (well, he was neglected if not abandoned by his slutty mother) He seems so innocent in his pursuit, so earnest about his captures.

The jammy b. The man loved by women more like. Cus they all say Yes.

"Its hard to refuse you anything. You have a special way of asking. Its as if your life depended on it" says one smitten women. And its true - he does. He's not just putting it on to get them in the sack. Well, he is. But at the time he must believe it. The woman in front - before his captivating gaze - is captivated, is the be all and the end all. Of this moment, of this very moment of capture, of conquest - she is It.

He captures these women like a painter or a poet would: with devotion to the visual image, with utter fidelity to the language of love: "the way she moved...she undulated like seaweed"; he distinguishes "between the tall stems and the pretty blossoms"

He's leched or loved after (take your pick) just about every woman he comes a across. What he seems to like is not women, the whole woman - just their legs with stockings on and stilettos. Or perhaps a specific aspect or attribute. Cus every woman has some particular thing about them that can be loved. Some bit, some part, some posture or pose. You divide that bit off - and discard the rest.

"You think you enjoy love, but its just the concept you love" says Geneviève (Brigitte Fossey) Yes. he's in thrall to the idealisation of women. That's why he has to keep chasing after the next one. Cus the actual is never as ideal as the perfected fantasy.

"I was worried. You haven't caressed my legs for a week" says Delphine (Nelly Borgeaud) That made me laugh. Out loud. I'm sure there are some (French) women who just crave their long legs (preferably stockinged) being caressed.

There's a warmth about this film. It's not oily. He's not a misogynist wolf. The smarmy juice of seductive insincerity is not present (the way i imagine it would be in the American remake starring that smarm-master, Mr Insincerity himself - Burt Reynolds). Charles Denner means it. He loves women. He does. Loves them to death.

I'll probably watch it again (and revise this review too) sometime soon. It's a film to go back to. On lonely loveless Sundays.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Film, 26 July 2009
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Mjbrassington "MICKYBEE" (UNITED KINGDOM) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
I saw this film years and years ago,and it always stuck in my mind as being a good film.Although I don't speak french fluently it doesn't matter as the film is simple to understand.Buy it watch it and appreciate what a good film can be like.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars L'Homme Qui Aiment Les Jambes, 14 May 2009
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DL Productions UK (Merseyside, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
When this came out in the late 70s, a lot of people marked this off as some kind of chic movie about women and his conquests, but they couldn't be further from the truth, this film explores love, relationships, and his love for the shapely leg, and how his love affairs went. I like the way he went into detail about his initial meetings and how the relationship progressed, and all in the guise of us reading his manuscript, and the script itself is very well written, and makes you feel like he's not just some self-gratifying love addict, but he's actually a thoughtful, conscience lover, who just loves women. He doesn't even boast about conquests, he pretty much gentlemanly about it all.

Charles Denner is perfect for this movie, and he has the right amount of charm without coming out all bizarre, his understanding of Bertrand Morane is spot on. I also liked Nelly Borgeaud as Delphine Grezel, her delinquent side made the film a bit more varied - and more profound. I also enjoyed Nathalie Baye's performance as Martine, as she was great, and the main reason why I rented it. François Truffaut showing that he can do slow films, with a lot of profoundness and show that a film with dialogue can have as much action as a lot of camera angles, locations and movement.

I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys French cinema, and has patience, otherwise you're going to hate this, it's slow, and can be rather boring at times if you don't enjoy long periods of dialogue. It does make for a great movie and is worth adding to your Truffaut collection. I like the way he doesn't insist on making every movie about Paris, but looks to other towns in France to make his films, even though we don't get to see much of Montpelier, you do get the feeling of the town, and the elegant women living there.

Have a go, worth a look.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The original is the real deal, 14 May 2010
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This review is for the Burt Reynolds version. For some unknown reason, reviews of the French version have also been inserted into this page for the American remake. This film was never released in the UK so the only way to see it is via this Region 1 DVD so make sure your DVD player is multi-region. To be honest, the French version is the more entertaining of the two, this one lacking the charm and whimsy of the original.

There are plenty of big-name stars in this, but perhaps that is the problem. Somehow, I just cannot accept that the man portrayed by Reynolds should end up on the psychiatrist's couch because he is attracted to and by, women. He gives a good performance but there is the overriding suspicion that Burt Reynolds can only ever be Burt Reynolds. Julie Andrews' as the psychiatrist seems much too sympathetic and I am not sure that Reynolds as the patient would pour his heart out to a woman unless he intended to bed her. Kim Basinger turns in what is almost a slapstick role and some of the comedic moments lean towards the silly rather than insightful. The impression seems to be that the cast was chosen for the box office receipts rather than the characterisations

For some reason, a film like this is something only the French seem to pull off with any aplomb. If you are a fan of any of the stars then you will watch this anyway but the French way is the better.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good filmmaking is timeless, 23 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
Nothing much happens but still enjoyable; must be a French film! No nudity or bedroom scenes despite the title suggesting that this must happen! I suspect the American remake is not much good; with Burt reynolds cast the lead in that you just know the subtlety of the original will be lost.
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5.0 out of 5 stars excellent!, 1 May 2014
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graham (leicester UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] (DVD)
very funny simple film...have watched it 6 times so far...these 'realistic-cinema' films makes very evident the stuff churned out by Hollywood appear very surface like; empty with enormous holes in attention-to-detail & basically unwatchable! a must have in 1's film collection.
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The Man Who Loved Women [DVD]
The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] by Francois Truffaut (DVD - 2003)
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