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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best there is
Let me start by saying I don't really like punk. Generally speaking I prefer the haunted or slayer, but this band truly is something special. This is their greatest album to date, even beating the superb 'from here to infirmary'. The utter contempt that matt skiba and co show for the abysmal current punk scene in the superb 'we've had enough' show that this is a punk...
Published on 27 Nov 2003 by Mr. S. P. Edwards

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not What I Expected
I was expecting something exactly the same as From Here To Infirmary with this album, and I was expecting too much it would seem. Unfortunately this album does not have the same punk feeling that From Here To Infirmary had. It is still a good album, and worth buying, but I would recommend FHTI much more, unless you are expecting a rock album. Good Mourning is a good album...
Published on 6 Jun 2004 by Ayersy


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best there is, 27 Nov 2003
By 
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
Let me start by saying I don't really like punk. Generally speaking I prefer the haunted or slayer, but this band truly is something special. This is their greatest album to date, even beating the superb 'from here to infirmary'. The utter contempt that matt skiba and co show for the abysmal current punk scene in the superb 'we've had enough' show that this is a punk band smart enough to not require milking each morning. Other higlights include the brooding 'continental', the incredibly catchy three cords of 'fatally yours' and the gentle post-good riddance closer 'blue in the face'. Overall this album is heartfelt, honest, catchy, accesible and downright genius.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 shots of pure brilliance, 18 Jun 2004
By 
Adam Cox (Blackpool, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
After discovering Alkaline Trio, by seeing their Private Eye video, I listened to From Here to Infirmary. It was one of the finest albums I have ever listened to. Good Mourning has that effect on me also, but even more so. Good Mourning has not been off my CD player since I got it. Opening with the loud and large rock anthems of This Could Be Love and We've Had Enough, the kind of songs that made them what they are today. Then comes the more melodic 100 Stories, with its catchy chorus. Followed by the well-written anthems of Continental and All on Black, perfectly cathcing Matt Skiba's great singing voice, with their brilliant loud and large choruses. Emma is a step into the more typical pop-punk genre away from the Trio's usual dark style. Fatally Yours and Every Thug Needs A Lady are more into the trio's normal punk style. Blue Carolina combines good riffs with a very catchy chorus. Donner Party is another of the simple well-written fun rock songs that made the Trio famous. If We Never Go Inside showcases Dan Adriano(Bass) taking the microphone and execute his good voice to a great song with a great chorus. The album ends with the excellent Blue In The Face, an acoustic solo effort by Matt Skiba, ending the album with the question, Your coffin or mine?
The verdict is as follows; Alkaline Trio do not disappoint on their follow-up to From Here To Infirmary, with a diverse collection of great songs, including their usual dark style and some new takes on songs also. Good Mourning is a must-have to any punk fan or Alkaline Trio fan. Take my word for it, if were not a fan of the Trio before, this album could very quickly cahnge your mind.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning addition to their already amazing back catalogue, 14 Feb 2004
By 
Richard Starr (Northallerton, North Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
About two years ago, I bought a ticket to see a punk band who were to play Fibbers in York, on the recommendation of a friend. As it turned out, they cancelled, leaving me with a tenner spare, so I went out and bought their current album to see what I'd missed. That turned out to be the magnificient From Here To Infirmary, packed full of catchy punk riffs and the darkest lyrics I'd ever heard from a band of their kind. Naturally when Good Mourning came out, I was eager to hear it. At first I was unsure, they had more slick and creative guitar parts to what I was used to, but it din't take long for me to be converted. It is technically better on every level, with Derek Grant adding a wall of sound and some spine-tingling howls to the mix, and Matt's voice has developed into a husky growl. The songs themself are all pretty excellent, but in particular I have to recommend Blue In The Face: A beautifully dark accoustic song that brings out the best in Skiba's vocals, Continental: for it's catchy lyrics and tune, Emma: for one of the best choruses that the trio have ever written, and finally All On Black: in my opinion, the best song they've ever written, featuring darker than dark lyrics and beautifully crafted guitar parts. I would say that the first half of the album is a fair bit stronger than the second half, but with out a bad song on the record, I'm not complaining. Awe inspiring.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, 2 Feb 2004
By 
(Nearly) Mr D Grohl (Bradford, West Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
This was the 1st Alkaline trio I got and its amazing. I'd heard the better known song off their other albums-Stupid Kid, Private Eye-and loved them so decided to get the album. The songs are all superbly written and to quote another review, manage to make you feel bad even when your in a good mood. This could get depressing but songs like 'Every Thug Needs A Lady' are brilliant pick ups. 'Every Thug....' is prob one of my fav tracks of all time. From a drumming point of view the albums faultless too. I saw these guys in Manchester and they're even better live than on CD.
I wouldn't group them in with blink, NFG like a few other reviews say. I think they're a bit more 'grown up' than those bands- good as they are. I'd say they were more like American Hi-Fi or Green Day. Generally a Brilliant album and a good introduction to this amazing band.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Punk Rock from the Windy City, 6 Jun 2003
By 
Mr. N. A. Johnson "fugazi34" (Swansea, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
With all the bubblegum and weak bands being bandied about as punk these days, yes we mean you Sum41, Good Charlotte, Blink etc, etc. It's cool to see a band come by with good tunes covering the darker side of life. Although not as totally engaging as From Here to Infirmary, this albums has more hooks than a fishing tackle shop, We've Had Enough is mental blowing away that we punk fans have had to put up with. Buy this album, and if you don't own From Here To then buy that as well, you won't be disappointed!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A class act, 6 Jun 2003
By 
Andy Gaskell (Leicester, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
Matt Skiba and his Alkaline Trio return with this fantastic new album, slighly different to the previous From Here To Infirmary album, as the songs are a lot darker. To me this album appears to be very similar to the Maybe I'll Catch Fire Album. Once again superb use of drums and brilliant guitar work make this album a classic and a must for any Alkaline Trio or alternative rock fan
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Somewhat similar 5th album from Chicago's emo-rocker's., 19 May 2003
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
The similarities between Good Mourning and From Here To Infirmary are obvious, it has an comic title, 14 tracks (2 extra for us in the UK) and, surprisingly for an album which was intended to propel the 'Trio further into the mainstream, little change in the topic or sound of the music. On first glance it would appear that Alkaline Trio haven't progressed one iota over the past two years. Matt Skiba still hasn't learned how to play anything apart from power-chords and his lyrics still tell of death, love and hate, though perhaps in a more eloquent fashion. Even a new drummer in the form of Derek Grant has done little to change the sound. Is this a bad thing though? Alkaline Trio's strength has always been in their trademark sound which has the rare ability of making you cry, before picking you up and then hurling you down again.
The new album has inexplicably lost much of the instant sing-along properties of From Here To Infirmary but has gained the aura of a somewhat more meaningful, less poppy, album. Admittedly you will find yourself bawling along to We've Had Enough and Every Thug Needs A Lady but songs like This Could Be Love and Dead End Road (which, I believe, initially appeared on compilation LP Living Tomorrow Today and is arguably the highlight of the album) demand to be listened to and understood, something which can be said of few of the tracks on the previous album. Skiba also finally picks up his acoustic again on Blue In The Face which is brilliantly similar to he fantastic Sorry About That from 1998's Goddamnit.
Good Mourning has all the hallmarks of an album by a band which has finally found itself, from the vastly improved production to the great presentation, hell, it even smells nice. However this is not a quick fix album, it will take you at least a couple of weeks to get into. If you're already a fan then don't expect different, but then you guessed that. For newcomers get From Here To Infirmary first, then Maybe I'll Catch Fire and finally this. Crazy sounding advice I know which will no doubt go largely disregarded but when you own all their albums you'll maybe understand that new is not necessarily better. Please don't buy this album if your understanding of "punk" is Blink 182, Avril Lavigne and Sum 41 but if you can enjoy stirring guitar riffs and the most intellectual, evocative lyrics you're heard for a couple of years then dive in, fall down and you'll never look back...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth The Wait?, 14 May 2003
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
I've been waiting a few years for this album now, and i must admit i was concerned that age might blunt the fury of this talented and ever-angry three piece.
I'm happy to say that my fears were totally unfounded, as Good Mourning sees the boys return on blistering form. The clue is in the title; a pun which hints at a darkness that chief vocalist Matt Skiba can never seem to escape.
Quite where this album fits into the Alkaline Trio legacy I'm not sure. Its glossier than any previous release, and some might argue that its the rawness of their earlier albums which gave the songs their powerful emotional edge. On the other hand, the quality of the songwriting is undiminished, and a few tracks here stand alongside established classics such as "Radio" and "Goodbye Forever".
Overall another great record from Alkaline Trio. I've been a fan of this band for years, and they've yet to let me down. If you're a fan of the band or of emo/punk in general then this is a must. If not then ask yourself one question; do you want an album which can make you laugh and cry, bring you down and lift you up, time after time? If so, click "add to basket"
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5.0 out of 5 stars Step One Buy this Album, 11 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
This is an excellent album with many great songs and also the first album with Derek who I was lucky enough to see live recently and a very good drummer indeed and has helped Alkaline Trio grow into a tighter more efficient unit. For me this was the break out album for Alkaline Trio.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good Mourning to you too, Sir, 11 Jun 2007
By 
J. Clarke "Alright Sally" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Good Mourning (Audio CD)
"So go plug in your electric blanket.. We can stay in 'till our southern summer wedding day'

2003 subtly saw Alkaline Trio's fourth album come into the light. With 'From Here To Infirmary' proving to be the bands most successful release at the time, 'Good Mourning' certainly had to cater to those ambitious expectations and promise, tenfold as they had to introduce a new member of the band - Drummer, Derek Grant. Somehow though, it seemed to go under the radar of many critics, magazines and websites, escaping any hype, disappointment or critique of any kind. In due course though, GM started to get its sound heard thanks to an official music video for one song and standard single release for another. For me, I was a bumbling 13 year old ready to be influenced by a greater wealth of sound, finding my way in the world of rock music, with only a couple of AT songs under my belt in 'Private Eye' & 'Stupid Kid' - both singles from FHTI. A blind purchase of GM however proved to be one of the luckiest and appreciative gambits I'd ever made concerning music. That's not to say the album caters exclusively to teenagers, nearly ten years later and I still find selections of its songs in my playlists, along with one of my all time favourite songs...

"I don't blame you for walking away, I'd do the same if I saw me. I swear it's not contagious, swear to God it's not contagious.."
3 seconds into 'This Could Be Love' is fresh and surprising due to the use of a 2nd guitar in the introduction (They're called Alkaline Trio for a reason). It's melody, dark and sinister on only 3 chords, manages a sturdy, palm muted version during the verses where vocalist Matt Skiba recalls his disgustingly sadistic and heartfelt affections in a gentlemanly mannar with "I touch myself at thoughts of flames, I POOP the bed, I laid there in it, thinking of you, wide awake for days". With each verse, the guitar gains more snap, crackle & pop than rice crispies down to its sweet pull offs and rhythmic breaks. In classic Trio style, the chorus brightly picks up a gorgeously happy tone, using a new set of 3 chords, whilst detailing their maddening violent escapades - "Step 1, slit my throat, step 2, play in my blood. Step 3, cover me in dirty sheets and run laughing out of the house. Step 4, stop at lake Michigan and rinse your crimson hands - You took me hostage and made your demands, I couldn't meet em so you cut off my fingers - one by one". Bassist Dan Andriano holds the notes of the 'steps' with a resolute richness as he echoes the backing vocals. It's only until the end where the pace gets a kick up the jacksey, bells ring out like it were Christmas and Derek Grant attempts to snap both wrists with intense drum rolls. Despite the songs imaginative content, I normally find a sickening urge to sing along to the troubling lyrics. 'We've Had Enough' continues the speed where track 1 left off, keeping the church bells too. "That said, we've had enough, please turn that f-ing radio off. Ain't nothing on the air waving the despair we feel, NO!" is another tempting line to shout out as well. Used as the albums lead single, it's a solid song that anyone can appreciate, although by no means the best of offerings. It also includes some influences in its lyrics mentioning The Misfits song 'Walk Among Us".. worth noting.

"You're in the next room sleeping and I'm, shouting out a song for you"
The first line of 'One Hundred Stories' after a familiar but welcome 3 chord riff. 'One Hundred Stories' the first Andriano song, its a fair break from the energetic dose of a 2-packs-a-day smoking Skiba. It's lyrics ressemble that of album and title track 'Maybe I'll Catch fire' considering its suicidal thoughts of despair, ("No one could tell even if I fell 100 stories straight down") but this time has a twinge of pleasantries as Dan delicately urges you to "Dream a good one tonight". The use of hammond organ, as delightful as it sounds, gives an almost gothic twist to the proceedings. Contemplations of killing himself and musing over what Hell is like, Dan closes the song in contrasting mood as Skiba etches out the previous sweet dreams shtick and he tells that he "was getting bored with hurting himself", again, surprisingly depressing despite the jolly rocking guitars. No.4 on the songlist is a peculiar one. 'Continental' uses a note hopping riff (instead of the usual octave) to good effect in a song supposedly about a heroin addict, lovely. Surely enough, the chords come back for the 1st verse with Skiba casting an equally morbid image by closing with "I've got your pictures on my walls, I've got a long list of calls I must make... to your existing family". It has a real driving force to it because of the show off behind the drum kit and all over chorus chords. "You had nine lives and one by one you chewed them up. Your final coffin nails been driven far too much" is sang in a controlled jazzy voice the first 2 times until the climactic 3rd (after a bassy solo and tap delay effects) where Skiba roars with emotion, almost screaming, you can imagine his eyes bulging out of his skull and spit hitting your eyeballs.

"What's upside down what's coated in silver? This crucifix is my four leaf clover"
I absolutely love this Alkaline Trio song, the strongest on the album and odds on favourite as personal best of all time, 'All On Black' is the song that got me into rock music for good, got me picking up the guitar and being the very first thing to learn. Ok, so I oversold that but its nostalgic value to me makes it a real winner. It starts pretty predictively with a congregation of harsh chords, then descends into a dark sequence of bass notes and shifting snare drum. "I put it all on black, no colour you're all dressed in and a stab in the back, left you bleeding on the floor" is as always a horror story regaled by Skiba in grotesque detail "And I'm mourning the death, the recent passing of your insides". Despite the tale of tragic love and other themes I couldn't possibly comprehend, you feel slight sympathy for him when he says "I'm living in lack of the blood sent from the heavens. I'm just trying to relax, as the killer's waiting right outside my door". Then bam, a strong note is hit with force and the bridge kicks in and head-banging ensues. "What's black and white what's, red all over? This tired book this, organ-donor" is the cryptic satire joke that acts as a momentum building moment and major turning point in the song - to the chorus. A concoction of a ritualistic checklist including a "sacrificial offering of virgin ears". Suddenly the guitars come in waves of high pitched scratches and there's a rushing feeling to it. After some "Sweet Blasphemy and "Salivating over you", the trio take part in some echoed harmonising at the death. "One of these days, it's gunna catch up to you, throwing looks like those around... And one of these nights, I promise to you, I'll soon be sleeping sound as soon as I leave town" are the last words of a gloating and spiteful Matt Skiba, cut off by an upbeat speeding melody, mimicking the getaway he sought after.

"You went out with a bang when you took.. with you all my dreams underground"
'Emma' is possibly the bands happiest sounding song they've written. Still using that 3 chord structure religiously, it's Andriano who takes the reigns once more, stating that "Emma appeared like an angel, Emma fell like rain. Into my lap like a heart attack, like lightning from her name" - puts Shakespeare to shame! Truly the party song if ever there was one, 'Emma' chugs away on all instruments and boasts a perplexing chorus with "a poinsettia in poison rain", "trading true love for insult & injury", a couple of medieval weaponry and vicodin of course! This has to be the easiest song to perform but a right mouthful trying to sing. 'Fatally Yours', the shortest track at 2:16 is a blur of up/downstrokes and a bouncy skiba reminiscing over a grisly relationship, "You told me that you missed me, but you meant with the grill and hood" indicating a hit and run style break up. Completely smitten, the threats of a manic girlfriend aren't enough to discourage Skiba as he doesn't mind packing his 'POOP' and leaving without a word or being put out of his misery altogether. Andriano' best track arrives in the form of 'Every Thug Needs A Lady' - which sounds just as poetic as its lyrics. "From here I can hardly see a thing, but I will follow anyone who brings me to you, for now, forever, for on and on and on". See? the guys can come up with in the odd romantic gesture, even if it is stained with the blood of an unwilling sacrifice. It's verses slowly trudge along, then pick up with frantic drumming and vicious guitar-playing that spans all over the fretboard. "You know it starts here, outside waiting in the cold, kiss me once in the snow, I swear it never gets old and I will promise you, I can make it warmer next year" stands out amongst many of the albums lyrics, be it because its as pure and loving as possible or because it is accompanied by cheery diddling acoustic guitar notes..

"Same place, same hello's, same goodbyes.. helps you get through beat up insides"
'Blue Carolina' starts with furious urgency, largely down to the ever technical drumming from Grant, but also because Skiba plays various clashing notes. A song to drive to, the tempo is as unrelenting as the vocals are eager (Andriano). It is by this time that the listen realises the generic sound of the album - it's bare bones, twisted, ironic and heartfelt rock and roll thats raw and real, but polished with crystal clear recordings and digital trickery. "Nervous and anxious, it really counts this time. You know all my favourite singers have stolen all of my best lines" is smoothly sang in a way that ressembles Elvis Costello.. or at least it does in my mind.. Full of 'Yeahs' and backing vocals, its another one to sing your heart out to. 'Donner Party (All Night)' continues the gory & grim theme of the album, "And all in all I guess it's for the better if you just can't feel a f-ing thing" delivered with impeccable happiness, "A place we'll call the final resting place.. in pieces" growing ever darker in its imagery. There are some lapses in the dread though, with short gasping breaths and hand claps. 'If We Never Go Inside' is the last song from Andriano (which by this time, sort of ressembles 'Blue Carolina' due to some slightly stagnant guitar work). The words, deceivingly bright with "your calendar is always pinned on summertime" only to turn into a little word of advice in "Hold your breath, walk don't run through the graveyard". Derek Grant's Hi-hat skills are worth noting even in my typical guitarist perfunctory way, though it must be said that he does a stellar job throughout his debut in the Trio, despite a lack of mentions. Skiba even shows off a tad with his scaling octaves, but with Andriano at the mic, only one man is gunna steal the show, pitch perfect as always.

"And all that followed fell, like Mercury to Hell"
Like the bands debut album 'Goddamnit', they say goodnight with a classy acoustic number from Matt in 'Blue in the Face'. The last song may from the default setting of a guitar, bass and drumkit, but it doesn't shirk any responsibilities to do with quality or the theme - which by now is vampiric.. "It's about time that I came clean with you, no longer fine.. I'm no longer running smooth" is contradictory as it is sang smoother than baby butt. Even with throat problems and a smokers cough, the vocals are perfect in an honest way. The old, rustic guitar playing is only matched by the final forlorn undead love scrawling of "I don't dream since I quit sleeping, and I haven't slept since I met you.. And you can't breathe without coughing at daytime, and neither can I.. so what do you say.. your coffin or mine?". And that's that, the official end anyway (the uk version has 2 bonus tracks of 'Dead End Road' & 'Old School Reasons' which also appear on b-side collection 'Remains'). 'Good Mourning' is a macabre series of songs sang with practically every emotion possible, with passion, slickness and class.
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Good Mourning
Good Mourning by Alkaline Trio (Audio CD - 2003)
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