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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Like a Turner painting in music
When this album was recorded the band said that they wanted it to sound like a painting by JWH Turner set to music. They achieved this. Like Turner they turned to subjects out of step with what the rest of their contemporaries deemed worthy and created something of utter beauty and striking originality. The album opens with a short burst of Gregorian chanting.
The...
Published on 23 Feb. 2006 by Mr. Stuart J. Crosse

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars impressive
Why would I want to waste any more words wondering just who BSP remind me of? Does it matter? They have an attitude and a musical opinion that other bands either lack or contrive.
Rough Trade are knocking this out at a price which is just irresistible. Great, great sleeve. How can you resist?
Published on 17 Nov. 2003


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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Re-invented the wheel? More changed its function., 14 April 2005
By 
Mr. P. A. Robinson "PeteRobinsonNow" (Liverpool, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
I bought this album on the strength of the single 'Remember Me' which struck me as one of the most lyrically and musically outstanding songs i'd heard in a long-time. Before listening to the album i hadn't expected such a diversity of songs. From the quirky, edgy almost punky 'Favours in the Beetroot Fields' through the hazy, dream-like 'Blackout' all the way through to the melodic ponderings of 'Lately' this album pushes BSP way above their more mainstream contempories. After each listen you notice something about a song you hadn't noticed before such is the depth of Decline. I've heard BSP compared to a few different bands (Joy Division, Echo and the Bunnymen,The Smiths) but never really agreed. British Sea Power have developed a sound of their own which is original and refreshing.
Ratings /10 (trying not to get to carried away)
1. Men Together Today - 5/10 (bout 10 secs long)
2. Apologies To Insect Life- 7.5/10
3. Favours In The Beetroot Fields- 8/10
4. Something Wicked- 8/10
5. Remember Me- 9.5/10
6. Fear Of Drowning- 8.5/10
7. The Lonely- 7.5/10
8. Carrion- 7.5/10
9. Blackout- 8.5/10
10. Lately- 9.5/10 (very nearly 10)
11. A Wooden Horse- 8/10
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best debuts in years., 21 Feb. 2009
By 
Mr. AJ Harrison "Bundi School" (Middlesbrough, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
I love this album there's no two ways about it and being it was out nearly five years ago or something now it seems daft to talk about it in the present tense. I must admit i was a bit behind getting into this album but when i did, well it was definitley the wow factor. I think what i love so much about them is their ablilty to write truly interesting lyrics on top of brilliant rock music. How many albums describe Trojan horses, deaths head hawk moths and beetroot fields??? And the jaunty angular Pixies rock of the first tracks followed by the epic indie alt rock of 'Remember Me', 'Fear Of Drowning' and the beautiful 'Blackout' and 'Wooden Horse' cements it for me. To be honest i would say it was a classic and completley faultless. But like i say i'm a big fan.

Top 5 tracks - 'Favours In The Beetroot Fields', 'Fear Of Drowning', 'Remember Me', Something Wicked, 'Blackout' and 'A Wooden Horse'.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finally! A Great Band's Triumphant Release!, 9 Jun. 2003
By 
William Bird "Breukelen" (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
British Sea Power are one of the most dynamic interesting bands out there - their live shows attest to this! This album is a marvel with great the great songs "The Lonely", "Remember Me", "Fear of Drowning" and "A Wooden Horse". Joy Division meets Dinosaur jr. meets The Smiths. It ROCKS!
Don't forget to buy the singles for "It's a Lovely day Tomorrow" and "The Spirit of St. Louis"
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, 13 Feb. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
this has to be one of the greatest albums of recent times, i cant emphasise enough how wrong two of the previous reviewers are saying this is overrated, if anything it is underrrated. Great, rip-roaring guitars on tracks like "Apologies to insect life", "Favours in the beetroot fields" and "Remember me" are fantastic, whilst epics melody-fests like "Carrion" and "The lonely" are pure beauty, sealed up in a vacuum-sealed jar. The album grows in stature the more you listen to it. "British Sea Power's classic..." states the front cover- prophetic words.
Buy this album now, you will not be dissapointed
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic british indie music, 3 Jun. 2003
By 
a caldwell (kilwinning, ayrshire Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
What a great record! Vaguely comparable to the Kitchens of Distinction with a pinch of the Pixies, this band produce a classic indie sound which should see them catapult to fame and fortune. Too much has been made of the pretentious image of the band, who cares when the music is this good. Well worth seeing live as well, a truly interesting and unique experience in an age where there are too many copyist bands out there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Properly Remarkable Debut Of A Properly Remarkable Band, 26 Feb. 2012
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
One of the most interesting alternative bands around. I say alternative because they are still something of a cult here rather than a household name but even though that following took them once to number ten in the album charts I do wish that this band and the music they make were much more the trend setters than they are. With references ranging from everything from academic novelists, world war history and natural phenomena to Big Daddy often in the space of single songs and an increasingly grand guitar driven sound inspired by the ROCK :0) of the natural world that Arcade Fire owes a debt to and not the other way round not forgetting to mention their unorthodox foliage and plastic animals strewn live acts and their willingness to take this act to more than just your usual underground dive (local libraries, the highest pub in Britain, the Natural History Museum, the BBC Countryfile show anyone) they lay claim to be one of if not the most substantial and down right life affirming bands of the last ten years.

BSP's debut seems made with the creation of a particularly culty and passionate fan base in mind and you can see why with it being a feverish collision of manic rockers, raw production work and the occasional epic soundscape we have come to expect of more in later albums but in more condensed form. It is such a remarkable debut in fact that even though I personally think they have at least equalled it with Do You Like Rock Music this album remains to many British Sea Power fan the reason why they always write such excitable and praise full reviews about them and follow them all over the country to catch them live as much as possible.

The album starts with a few seconds of solemn religious-like chanting before it is gate crashed by a double hit of punky rock so rabid sounding that you cant help but be astonished by them. Before you get a chance to properly though Apologies To Insect Life and Favours In The Beetroot Fields (such live favourites to this day) are themselves swept out of the way by a section of more usual BSP epic rockers (mostly this albums single releases and some of their best ones too) and then a lovely cure-like ballad called Blackout appears near the middle. And finally before you know it you've reached the final section and these speedy little numbers are halted by the mighty 15 minutes of Lately a slow burning rock ballad so climactic and outstanding that they have been obliged to close the majority of their live shows with it from then onwards. BSP's first album sounds like the start of a love affair. Looks like ten years later it's gonna be one of those life long ones :0).

P.s. to the new and uninitiated I hope you like the album. They have four more albums to try out that are just as good as this one. To the converted look out for the great website besteveralbums and put British Sea Power on your top 40. Who knows, maybe they'll even break the top ten some day here too :0).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a decline at all, 5 Jun. 2003
By 
T. LEWIS "Telboy" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
The album starts off with something akin to a Gregorian chart then blasts off into a Pixies sound-alike with track 2 "Apologies To Insect Life" sounding like "Nimrod's Son". By track 4 - "Something Wicked" - the organ sound comes to the fore and they take on a very Pulp like edge, especially in the quavery, fragile vocals. Track 6 "Fear Of Drowning" is the first to reveal a Joy Division feel and the following tracks blend all these influences, especially the multi-part 13' 58" epic that is "Lately", which also hints at Yo La Tengo, Sonic Youth and many others. This is a pretty decent album overall and worth the very reasonable asking price.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, 3 Nov. 2003
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
This is simply the most stunning debut album I have heard since Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures. Despite having some glances back towards Echo and The Bunnymen, XTC and Joy Division, they don't pay homage to those bands but elevate song writing to beautiful new heights. It is packed with originality and sheer musical and lyrical brilliance.
The Decline of British Sea Power roams from Gregorian chant, 100% adrenaline infused punk to some of the most hauntingly gorgeous melodies and lyrics you will hear for many years to come. "Lately", running in at 14 minutes long is destined to become a classic. It is a sign of a young band with extraordinary talent, rarely have 14 minutes seemed so neccesary.
Few albums are worthy of being labelled as truly great, this is.
A simply wonderful album.
Buy it, love it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best of British, 19 July 2003
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
Energetic, atmospheric, this album is like a fresh sea wind blowing. Beginning with a brooding, monk-like harmony it rips into the Surfer Rosa-era Pixies style 'Apologies To Insect Life' before levelling out into a record rich in melody and drama. To make comparisons, I would choose James, (early) Suede and Joy Division. Yan's breathy vocals are an instant hit and the music is raw and well controlled. The cover reads 'We ourselves may be loved only for a brief time...' Well this record will be listened to for a long time by myself and I'm sure there are many likeminded. Definite thumbs up.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishing., 23 Feb. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Decline Of British Sea Power (Audio CD)
This is a truly great album. A lot of people have been saying that influences from other great UK bands like Joy Division and The Smiths/Morrissey are evident. I certainly agree with that.
I also think there is almost a house/techno influence to their sound, not an obvious one though. It's not the instruments, it's more in the arrangements and some of the driving bass lines. It's a great record.
That Petrol Emotion doing covers of The Smiths produced by 808 State???
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