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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Meanwhile, at the bar, a drunkard reviews...
"Monday at the Hug and Pint" is arguably Arab Strap's best album to date. It combines the lo-fi eclecticism of their first album, with the great sonic leaps forward made on their last long player "The Red Thread". Both permanent members of the band, Aidan Moffat and Malcolm Middleton, have released solo albums since "The Red Thread", and the time apart to stretch and...
Published on 20 April 2003 by G. J. Weaver

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Re: nice little number
Well I've absolutely no idea what our Estonian friend was on about, but hey, maybe it was Moffat in disguise? Monday...is generally in keeping with the Strap's previous work, if a little fuller in sound. Nevertheless, the downbeat rambling is still evident, and the tunes as dingy, sleazy and as compelling as ever. The albums opener, The Shy Retirer, and Serenade are...
Published on 11 May 2003 by Andrew Hooker


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Meanwhile, at the bar, a drunkard reviews..., 20 April 2003
By 
G. J. Weaver "elweaverino" (Chester, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
"Monday at the Hug and Pint" is arguably Arab Strap's best album to date. It combines the lo-fi eclecticism of their first album, with the great sonic leaps forward made on their last long player "The Red Thread". Both permanent members of the band, Aidan Moffat and Malcolm Middleton, have released solo albums since "The Red Thread", and the time apart to stretch and experiment has obviously done them some good. The song "The Week Never Starts Around Here" is very reminiscient of the stuff on Malcolm's superb album "5:14.....", and that's no bad thing.
There is also the addition of a string section on a lot of the tracks here, which lifts the proceedings onto another level entirely.
As always, the lyrics have the usual grim humour about them. The opening track "The Shy Retirer" begins like a cheesy dance track, but switches into a scathing description of the monotony of the average weekend. "Another bloated disco", moans Aidan, "another sniff of romance I'll forget." Other stand out tracks include the soporific waltz "Who named the days?", and bagpipe layered folkie "Loch Leven".
The Strap's philosophy seems to be that if we are all in the gutter, then lets get hammered, talk about girls and give the v's behind the back of anyone poncing around staring at the stars. And, y'know, it makes such perfect sense.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Swirling low-fi brilliance, 29 Feb 2004
This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
The latent beauty of this album is locked underneath some magnificent production and subtle licks and trails, it winds on endlessly and can only really be properly listened to in the dark early hours of the morning after some nice central nervous system therapy if you get my drift. Everything gels so perfectly that I wouldnt be overstating calling this a work of genius. More eclectic than elephant shoe, even though I do prefer that album for different reasons, its secrets will be a permanent and potent fuel to my imagination like few others can touch.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sad brilliance, 10 Nov 2006
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This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
Slurrings heavily laced with a Scottish tongue and more swearwords than expected for tunes involving string accompaniments and acoustic guitars (`Fucking Little Bastards' or lyrics like "so come on darling, break my heart// mess me about then shag all my friends" speak volumes, don't they?), there is something unnervingly brilliant about Arab Strap.

There is a backbone that is full of stored venom and released in such a delicate and saddening way that contributes to the whole release being memorable - and somewhere in all this, there is a bitter influence from drink, making it a devastating masterpiece. If this is the result of going to the Hug & Pint on a Monday, then thank their aching hearts that Arab Strap attended - you can certainly hear the drink talking at points.

And as well as this, there is a delicate underside, best exemplified by the tortured string arrangements with expressive lyrics like: `If your hair was a call to arms/ And your legs were what skirts are for/ Then your mouth was a red alert/ But your eyes were an act of war'.

All work projects a message: this is what comes natural and has been intensely nurtured. Sure, this could be said for many an album, but this is so prominent that it brings an authenticity to the tracks and a genuine guarantee that Scottish heart and soul is in there somewhere.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Monday at the Hug and Pint.., 16 Jun 2011
This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
According to critics, this is supposed to be Arab Straps best release. It was with this in mind that I first listened to it. 'Monday at the Hug and Pint' is not a bad record by any standards, however its not a great record by Arab Strap standards. There are some classic songs on it, the highlights being the shy retirer and who named the days? For me though the album doesn't feel whole, more just a collection of songs. In my opinion it isn't as good as their earlier records (particularly Philophobia and Elephant Shoe) or as unified and hard hitting as their later (and last record) the Last Romance. Having said all this, the artwork of the record is brilliant and as an aesthetic package it works well. The songs on this record are more accessible than Arab Strap's starker earlier records. 'Monday at the Hug and Pint' has a more folky/country sound, so may be a good place for anyone starting out on Arab Strap to go. I would also recommend as a starting point their best-of 'Ten Years of Tears', their last album 'The Last Romance' and 'Philophobia' because its amazing. So, 'Monday at the Hug and Pint'- a good listen but won't change your life.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Re: nice little number, 11 May 2003
By 
Andrew Hooker (Beeston, Nottinghamshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
Well I've absolutely no idea what our Estonian friend was on about, but hey, maybe it was Moffat in disguise? Monday...is generally in keeping with the Strap's previous work, if a little fuller in sound. Nevertheless, the downbeat rambling is still evident, and the tunes as dingy, sleazy and as compelling as ever. The albums opener, The Shy Retirer, and Serenade are quality tracks, with gusto and bite. In the former, Moffat's lyricism is a succint as always..."Don't get me wrong I've always had plans for your lips and my lips, the first time I saw you I saw all my future right between your hips"! Meanwhile Malcolm Middleton's quitar is crisp, atmospheric and equally deserving of the intense nature of the alcoholism. Despite a few fillers, this is by far and away their most refined work, and the reuniting of the two Scots after their solo efforts is refreshing. A pleasant album, but lacking the ingenuity of the amazing Philophobia.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SOMETIMES YES, SOMETIMES NO, 5 May 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
The first album, referenced here on the song title was good. Philophobia was good too. By the time it came to Elephant Shoe I wasn't so bothered until I heard 1471. Classic. For some reason I still haven't got round to the Red Thread, but after hearing M@TH&P I definitely will: it is now a kind of reality that the Strap are the best band in the land. You can pretend to be foreign in Falkirk, but only on medication. Indie is dead. Long live the Strap. When I wake up, I wake up alone...
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9 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Act Of Amen, 29 April 2003
This review is from: Monday at the Hug & Pint (Audio CD)
Anno Domini 2003. Once again I recall something that has melted away long time ago. Days are passing by, they never end. Time is ticking away time after time, and you dont need to watch the clock to understand... So I walk in style and talk in style and listen to the Arab Strap. This is the music that makes us feel alive. Makes us feel that we're in style. Kind a controversial thing. Not just alcoholizable (is it really?), but almost too real to be unreal. It will survive from time to time and make us all pop and smile (at the end).
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Monday at the Hug & Pint
Monday at the Hug & Pint by Arab Strap (Audio CD - 2003)
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