Customer Reviews


34 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (16)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4.0 out of 5 stars The Case of the Wrong Richard
Great dramatic tension throughout. The right 'gothic' atmosphere of Dartmoor is sustained well.
The supporting cast is superb, especially John Nettles, Neve Mackintosh and Ron Cook.
But the central characters? A number of reviewers have reached the same conclusion I did, namely that not only does Richard Roxburgh look nothing like Sherlock Holmes (a fault...
Published 15 months ago by 'Fountain Pen'

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Shoddy adaptation of the well-loved story
I was so ready to love this adaptation, but it fell flat on it's face after the first scene... Ian Hart's sullen Watson, who carries most of the drama, completely distracted me from the story. He should have been made to watch the Granada series with Jeremy Brett as Holmes and David Burke/Edward Hardwick (both) as a delightfully clever, upbeat and witty Watson who proved...
Published on 12 April 2012 by Flmfn


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Shoddy adaptation of the well-loved story, 12 April 2012
By 
Flmfn (Netherlands) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
I was so ready to love this adaptation, but it fell flat on it's face after the first scene... Ian Hart's sullen Watson, who carries most of the drama, completely distracted me from the story. He should have been made to watch the Granada series with Jeremy Brett as Holmes and David Burke/Edward Hardwick (both) as a delightfully clever, upbeat and witty Watson who proved a more than competent match for Brett's icy, introvert, brilliant Holmes. As for Richard Roxburgh, he still is one of my favorite actors (as well as the director of one of my all-time favorite films, Romulus my Father), just not in this adaptation. Too blond, too distant and simply too normal as Holmes, his acting skills were not well-used here, to put it mildly. Since he's well-known for solid acting in series like Blue Murder, East of Everything, Hawke and Rake, I can only blame the director for not using his talent. Richard E. Grant makes for a decent bad guy, though any viewer will know he is the Bad Guy from the moment his menacing face appears onscreen. I couldn't help but think that he would have made a better Holmes then Roxburgh, but personally, the late Jeremy Brett still goes unrivalled for me in that role.

As has been commented on by others, Holmes' unnecessary gung-ho tactics with the cabby, the random drug-taking (so out of sync with the original Doyle stories that is seemed just to be there as a gimmick) a very bland Sir Henry Baskerville and a decidedly uncreepy CGI hound, didn't help the story along either.

Shame, one of my favorite Doyle stories combined with one of my favorite actors, yet it just didn't gell. Missed opportunity here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A most distressing case..., 17 Sept. 2004
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
Oh dear...

It's easy to tell where this latest version of Conan Doyle's perennial classic goes wrong because so little goes right. There's little fault with the script, which does a decent job of retelling a by now overly familiar tale and even throws in an intriguingly gothic Christmas Eve party for good measure. Some of the supporting performances are fine - John Nettles and Richard E. Grant in particular. But the leads are so very wrong that they sap the life from the thing.

Ian Hart's Watson is surly and obnoxious, all too easily offended and trapped in a deeply distrustful relationship with Holmes. Since Watson has to carry much of the drama, this keeps us at arm's length from involvement, especially since Matt Day is such a dull Baskerville. However, where Hart is a good actor giving a misjudged performance, Richard Roxburgh gives every indication of being a bad actor giving a bad performance. He may not quite be the worst Holmes in the way that he was definitely the worst Dracula (in Van Helsing), but he's certainly the dullest and blandest despite his overstated distance and eccentricities, while the attempt to make him more of an action hero simply ends up making him a very ordinary figure instead. With all displays of Holmes' deductive reasoning dropped (even the famous scene with Dr Mortimer's walking stick is gone), his disguises omitted (he just appears on the moor as if he were still dressed for Baker Street) and his drug use wildly overdone (rather than resorting to narcotics when bored, he even jacks up in a public toilet while working on the case in this version), he's such a blunt bull in a China shop here that rather than pay the cabby for information, he beats him up instead as if he were a 19th century Popeye Doyle.

Although David Attwood's direction throws up the odd good bit of composition, the grotty lighting and perpetual green tint on the original TV broadcast version sap any signs of life before they can bloom. And the less said about the shoddily animated CGi hound the better - despite the impressively populated London street scenes, it's hard to believe that this is probably the biggest budgeted version since Rathbone and Bruce strode the Moor.

The BBC have previously had good luck with the tale - both their Peter Cushing and Tom Baker versions, studio-bound though they were, were more involving in their cosy Sunday teatime way. Sadly, this attempt to bring a more modern aesthetic, while marginally better than the dreadful Peter Cook and Dudley Moore spoof, is nonetheless a very poor show indeed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The Case of the Wrong Richard, 7 Feb. 2014
By 
'Fountain Pen' (London, England, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
Great dramatic tension throughout. The right 'gothic' atmosphere of Dartmoor is sustained well.
The supporting cast is superb, especially John Nettles, Neve Mackintosh and Ron Cook.
But the central characters? A number of reviewers have reached the same conclusion I did, namely that not only does Richard Roxburgh look nothing like Sherlock Holmes (a fault compounded, in my view, by the irritating voice that he gives to the character), and that Ian Hart's Watson is too abrasive, but crucially that the talented Richard E. Grant, while truly excellent as Stapleton, would have made an outstanding Holmes. I'd go so far as to say that if a new Sherlock Holmes TV series were to be made, Mr. Grant should be forced to accept the role on pain of death; and for good measure, I propose James Purefoy as Watson.
Despite these fundamental casting flaws, however, this dramatisation does cut the mustard. It keeps your attention, and I don't object greatly to insertions such as the sceance, however irrelevant, if the plot of the original is generally followed. The core mystery is sustained well until Holmes reveals all to Watson, some scenes (such as the coroner's inquest) are superbly done, and by and large the film does just enough justice to the novel to merit four stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A story I will never grow tired of...., 5 Jan. 2005
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
I read the novel of HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES several years ago, after having seen at least three of the many filmed versions. Despite my being forewarned of the plot I still found it an atmospheric and enthralling read, a true testament to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writing talents. It remains my favourite SHERLOCK HOLMES story (I've read every single one!) thanks to the clever blending of superstition and modern thinking (perhaps reflecting the times in which Conan Doyle wrote it) and I always welcome any new adaptation of this classic tale.
Sadly, the time when the BBC produced quality television as a matter of course has long passed; They now treat such prestige productions as this as an 'event' that arrives annually, perhaps in the hope that we appreciate it enough to forgive the rubbish they feed us the rest of the year. This latest version of THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES is indeed such an event: A quality production dripping with atmosphere and successfully infusing the tale with new slants and suprises. There can be very few members of the public that have not, by now, seen at least one adaptation of this famous yarn so I have much admiration for a writer who successfully takes such familiar material and makes it worth me watching all over again. Credit to all involved, as that is exactly what's been done.
The cast is uniformly excellent: Richard Roxburgh does on occasion seem to be supressing his Australian accent a little too much, but other than that makes a fine HOLMES. Both his performance and comments made by the actor on the DVD clearly demostrate that he understands the character, and the chance to see a younger, more energetic HOLMES is very refreshing. The same applies to Ian Hart as WATSON; He's a revelation in the role and carries his scenes with confidence. Nigel Bruce's bumbler to Rathbone's HOLMES is now a thing of the past, and Hart's assured performance stands along side my personal favourite WATSON, David Burke in the first Jeremy Brett series. Support from familiar names like John Nettles, Richard E. Grant and even Liza Tarbuck is very well delivered.
The story is so familiar I won't bother recounting it - It's the detail that make this film so enjoyable. The "spectral hound" itself proves that, despite horrendous overuse in rubbish like THE MUMMY, computer generated images can be effective and convincing. The direction is confident, the music suitably menacing and both the sound and art design are engaging & convincing.
There have been changes to the plot but as I mentioned earlier, such things are essential to keep such a familiar story fresh. My favourite adaptation remains the Hammer Studios version with Peter Cushing and Andre Morell, yet that takes enormous liberties with the storyline. One critcism I do share with a fellow reviewer is the scene of HOLMES injecting himself with drugs. He only needed the stimulus when not on a case, so it's inclusion here is wrong (as it was in the recent BBC SHERLOCK HOLMES film "The Case of the Silk Stocking" with Rupert Everett). The writer explains that HOLMES also took morphine to 'calm his thought processes' but I don't buy that - Still, it can't undermine what was a truly wonderful production mounted all too infrequently by the BBC.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, 13 Aug. 2011
By 
downkiddie "downkiddie" (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
This Holmes classic is given a Christmas setting in this adaptation. This festive atmosphere, combined with the seance and superb locations make it suitable gothic fare for Christmas TV (it was first shown as a one-off special at Christmas 2002). Richard Roxburgh's Holmes is quite acceptable, though here Dr Watson is rather sour faced and unpleasant - perhaps a conscious effort not to make him bumbling as the cliched view often is. The cast generally is very good and well suited to the material. The locations add to the production greatly - Liverpool doubles up as a bustling London, Levens Hall in the Lake District is a suitably forbidding Baskerville Hall, the Isle of Man's moorland interior is Dartmoor and Keighley station in West Yorkshire has a brief cameo as Exeter railway station. The story has been simplified a little, with no mention of Laura Lyons, and the ending is rather dark (though subsequently lightened in the final scene). Not the best adaptation ever made but very enjoyable and perfect viewing for a winter night.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb dramatisation, 31 Jan. 2010
By 
S. C. Johnson - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
I first saw this on Christmas Eve 2009 and thought it was brilliantly dramatised for television. By far the best Hound of the Baskervilles I have seen. I bought this dvd about a week or so after seeing it. I think Richard Roxburgh was a very good choice of actor to play Sherlock Holmes. Despite being Australian his English accent is very believable and is only outshone by his fantastic acting. The scenery in this adaptation is of a very high standard too. No cheap sets in this movie, which only adds to the believability of the film. I think Richard E Grant was a good casting for the role of Stapleton as he masters this very cunning and devious character. The choice of building for Baskerville Hall was superb and helps create a very chilling setting. Neve McIntosh was cleverly chosen too as the distraction for Dr Watson as she is absolutely stunning. To be honest she is another reason why I was gripped to this adaptation as Neve is a very attractive women. Aside from this I cannot recommend this film enough. My only reservation or criticism is the hound itself. Despite computer technology used to help create the hound I wasn't impressed to be honest. If you love this story buy this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, Wonderful Drama, 19 Feb. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
This adaptation from Conan Doyle's 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' is simply fantastic! All the members of the castare brilliant, particually Richard Roxburgh who manages to display a convincing English accent and give more depth to the character of Sherlock Holmes than previous actors have. The fact that he is not in the deer stalkers hat and smoking a pipe(this outfit was never mentioned in the original text), but rather in a smart black suit with bowler hat and smoking cigerettes, makes the character far more accessible to the modern day audience than previous incarnations and so is far more appealing. The attention to the fact that in the books Holmes is a drug addict is also given reference but it seems a little disjointed and only readers of the Holmes books may realise the significance. Ian Hart is a wonderful Watson, with the relationship between he and Holmes given an appropriate level of both antagonism and loyalty, with the issue of trust being strongly addressed. Ricard E Grant's performance as Stapleton the is perfectly chilling as the story unfolds. Support performances by Matt Day, Liza Tarbuck and John Nettles are all of a high standard to making this one of the best pieces of drama that the BBC has produced in a long time. Absolutely Fantastic!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The best production ever..., 25 Oct. 2010
By 
Of all the many versions I have seen of "The Hound of the Baskervilles," this is far and away my favorite. Granted, the mechanical hound is a bit over the top and artificial looking, but the rest of the story is fantastic, the casting excellent and the setting magnificent. On my next trip to England I must see Dartmoor. Before this Jeremy Brett was the consummate Holmes, but I think now that Roxburgh is even better and more believable, not such a dandy as Brett. All in all this is a wonderful production, and I cannot agree with those who have panned it here. I have watched it over and over and enjoy it every time. I really wish they would do some other Sherlock Holmes stories with this cast.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric version of Holmes horror/supernatural mystery classic, 10 April 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
The supporting cast is uniformly great. Holmes and Watson are OK. This is a darker version of the story with some more horror touches than previous versions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Good adaptation in the old fashioned way!, 9 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
Richard Roxburgh gives a good performance as SH. Excellent Watson and Richard E Grant makes a good if oily baddie! Always feel sorry for the hound though! Prompt delivery too in time for Christmas.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD]
The Hound of the Baskervilles [2002] [DVD] by David Attwood (DVD - 2003)
£3.90
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews