Customer Reviews


4 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mary Lee Kortes does Dylan live on classic albums night
My favorite all-time cover of a song is usually the Indigo Girls doing Dylan's "Tangled Up in Blue," but I am always on the look out for other versions of the track just to confirm by opinion. This is how I happened upon "Blood on the Tracks: Recorded Live at Arlene's Grocery," in which Mary Lee's Corvette covers Dylan's entire album from start to finish. For those of you...
Published on 19 Feb. 2005 by Lawrance Bernabo

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars GREAT MATERIAL (OBVIOUSLY), WEAK PERFORMANCE...
I agree that it takes 'guts' to cover one of the greatest artist's most powerful albums in it's entirety, but it also takes a good deal of talent and I don't hear enough coming from Mary Lee Kortes to pull it off successfully.
Her voice is not strong and her pitch is all over the place.
I can't imagine why anyone would rather listen to this when you can hear the...
Published on 31 Dec. 2012 by Jojo Allen


Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mary Lee Kortes does Dylan live on classic albums night, 19 Feb. 2005
By 
Lawrance Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Blood on the Tracks (Audio CD)
My favorite all-time cover of a song is usually the Indigo Girls doing Dylan's "Tangled Up in Blue," but I am always on the look out for other versions of the track just to confirm by opinion. This is how I happened upon "Blood on the Tracks: Recorded Live at Arlene's Grocery," in which Mary Lee's Corvette covers Dylan's entire album from start to finish. For those of you who are astounded by the audacity of Mary Lee Kortes to try and get away with covering an entire Dylan album it should be pointed out that the gig at Arlene's Grocery was for a "classic albums night." It just happened that the evening was recorded and ended up being the group's second album.
Kortes is a singer-songwriter whose most notable success to date was writing song "Everywhere I Go," which Amy Grant recorded. On the night in September of 2001 when this album was recorded Mary Lee's Corvette consisted of Andy York (guitar), Rod Hohl (acoustic guitar), Diego Voglino (drums), Brad Albetta (bass), and Andy Burton (piano/organ). Their version of "Blood on the Tracks" does not offer a radical reinterpretation of the text, I suspect because of their reverence for the original and the fact that the gig did not really give them enough time to come up with a lot of major changes. The most notable differences are on "Idiot Wind" and "Meet Me in the Morning," at least to my sensibilities, but you can make up your own mind. I was quite leery of the beginning of "Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts" when Kortes invited audience members up to try singing some of the length song's verses, but their extreme efforts suggest the sense of fun that the evening represented and Kortes does get the song back on track once she takes over.
Ultimately, throughout these ten tracks Kortes sounds like Dylan without sounding like Dylan (i.e., the intonations and rhythms rather than the tell-tale nasal twang). How much you like this album will rest entirely on whether you find her versions to be close enough to the originals, or different enough, to suit your tastes. This album is going to cut both ways with Dylan fans to be sure. Just listening to the clips provided above should assure you that listening to this one all the way through once would be worth the time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mary Lee Kortes does Dylan live on classic albums night, 11 Mar. 2004
By 
Lawrance Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Blood on the Tracks: Recorded Live at Arlene Grocery (Audio CD)
My favorite all-time cover of a song is usually the Indigo Girls doing Dylan's "Tangled Up in Blue," but I am always on the look out for other versions of the track just to confirm by opinion. This is how I happened upon "Blood on the Tracks: Recorded Live at Arlene's Grocery," in which Mary Lee's Corvette covers Dylan's entire album from start to finish. For those of you who are astounded by the audacity of Mary Lee Kortes to try and get away with covering an entire Dylan album it should be pointed out that the gig at Arlene's Grocery was for a "classic albums night." It just happened that the evening was recorded and ended up being the group's second album.
Kortes is a singer-songwriter whose most notable success to date was writing song "Everywhere I Go," which Amy Grant recorded. On the night in September of 2001 when this album was recorded Mary Lee's Corvette consisted of Andy York (guitar), Rod Hohl (acoustic guitar), Diego Voglino (drums), Brad Albetta (bass), and Andy Burton (piano/organ). Their version of "Blood on the Tracks" does not offer a radical reinterpretation of the text, I suspect because of their reverence for the original and the fact that the gig did not really give them enough time to come up with a lot of major changes. The most notable differences are on "Idiot Wind" and "Meet Me in the Morning," at least to my sensibilities, but you can make up your own mind. I was quite leery of the beginning of "Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts" when Kortes invited audience members up to try singing some of the length song's verses, but their extreme efforts suggest the sense of fun that the evening represented and Kortes does get the song back on track once she takes over.
Ultimately, throughout these ten tracks Kortes sounds like Dylan without sounding like Dylan (i.e., the intonations and rhythms rather than the tell-tale nasal twang). How much you like this album will rest entirely on whether you find her versions to be close enough to the originals, or different enough, to suit your tastes. This album is going to cut both ways with Dylan fans to be sure. Just listening to the clips provided above should assure you that listening to this one all the way through once would be worth the time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pop will eat itself, 24 Jan. 2006
By 
Lozarithm (Wilts, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Blood on the Tracks: Recorded Live at Arlene Grocery (Audio CD)
First up, I loved Mary Lee Kortes' liner notes, about preparing for the great night at the Arlene Grocery, when she was invited at short notice to perform Blood On The Tracks with her band, at a Classic Album Night (the date is sadly unspecified, but was a Sunday night, some time in 2001 well before September 11). I loved the spirit with which she engaged on this act of folly and bravura, and the sense of fun and fear the whole project embodied, typified by the line, "On the Wednesday before the show I thought it might be time to learn the harmonica." Of course, that gave her plenty of time to learn to play better than Bob (only joking). She also explains how the existence of a record of the night, on this CD, also evolved in an almost accidental, ad hoc sort of a way.
As we know, pop will eat itself, and there is a worthy tradition of albums that recreate other albums in their entirety. Abbey Road alone has inspired several (Booker T & the MGs - McLemore Avenue, Mike Westbrook - Off Abbey Road, George Benson - The Other Side Of Abbey Road, etc.). On the subject of the Beatles, Laibach did Let it Be, Big Daddy did Sgt Pepper and Ramsey Lewis tackled the White Album. Aside from the moptops, there was, for example, Petra Haden's multi-tracked acappella version of The Who Sell Out; Philip Glass orchestrated "Heroes"; Charlie Hunter did a jazz quartet reworking of Natty Dread; Joe Gallant remade the Grateful Dead's Blues For Allah; Carla Bozulich paid homage to Willie Nelson's Red Headed Stranger; there was a multiple artist recreation of Fleetwood Mac's Rumours; and, getting back to Dylan, Robyn Hitchcock made an album of the "Albert Hall" concert bootleg.
This is a companion piece to the original Blood On The Tracks, it does not seek to replace it. I for one enjoyed hearing it a lot, and expect to be playing it alongside the original in the future. Bob Dylan liked it, too. He posted one of the songs onto his website.
Since the idea was to play someone else's album live, for fun, not too many liberties have been taken with the songs or their arrangements. Idiot Wind follows the angry album version rather than the earlier version on the Bootleg Series CD; alternative verses of Lily are not adopted, as they are not heard on the album. What we get is the body of the original album inhabited by another soul who is a gifted singer, and it is a purged soul, with warmth, spirit, anger and all the other emotions to be found in the songs. It is all we could ask of such an undertaking.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars GREAT MATERIAL (OBVIOUSLY), WEAK PERFORMANCE..., 31 Dec. 2012
By 
This review is from: Blood on the Tracks (Audio CD)
I agree that it takes 'guts' to cover one of the greatest artist's most powerful albums in it's entirety, but it also takes a good deal of talent and I don't hear enough coming from Mary Lee Kortes to pull it off successfully.
Her voice is not strong and her pitch is all over the place.
I can't imagine why anyone would rather listen to this when you can hear the poet himself interpret these personal songs exactly as he intended them (and even he recorded them twice in an effort to get them 'right').
Some things were meant to be left as they are, especially if you can't bring something fresh or revealing to them.
Two stars for recognizing the brilliance of the original work (and, OK, guts) but 3 off for not doing it justice.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews