Customer Reviews


47 Reviews
5 star:
 (33)
4 star:
 (11)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great album from Yes
Yes released this one in 1974. This is the third cd release of it but is by far the most worthwhile to purchase. Extensive sleeve notes in a fold out booklet and all the original sleeve artwork in a cardboard sleeve and outer sleeve case. Much has been written about Relayers sparse feel and the jam section on the first track 'The Gates of Delirium' which occupied one side...
Published on 16 Jan 2004 by S. C. Trump

versus
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very poor 're-master'
I have this on an old vinyl copy and wanted a digital version. Can't believe how bad the sound quality is on this 're-master'! Two of the extra tracks are a waste of space as they are just shortened edits of the main tracks (for single release). The extra version of 'Delirium' sounds like a studio rehearsal. Oddly the sound quality of this rehearsal is much better...
Published 4 months ago by Adrian


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece, 14 Jan 2012
By 
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
Who has the right to say (as does the reviewer on iTunes) that this has the most disappointing opening of any Yes album? Poppycock!! The Gates of Delirium - start to finish - to me stands as their greatest single work. Most of Yes' lyrics were non-sensical, whereas the anti-war message of this epic is very clear indeed. The various "movements" through which this piece takes the listener are easily understood and the frantic battle section makes me feel frightened, excited, sad, breathless and dumbstruck at the sheer scope of musicianship required to put such a "suite" together.

I'm a huge Floyd fan and never cared much for Jon Anderson's voice, but Floyd never even approached the complexity of "Gates". Even Yes' own "Close to the Edge" to me sounds quite dull by comparison. Once you get to the end of the "battle" segment of "Gates", the sublimeness of Patrick Moraz's keyboards during the closing "Soon" section are extremely moving and bring all kinds of emotions out in me. Even after all these years, I listen to this on my iPod and am dumbstruck with awe. There never was a classical composer who produced anything better than this band on this album, especially on "The Gates of Delirium".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Lost Gem!, 1 Aug 2007
By 
Stotty (Bolton, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
Relayer is unique in that it is the only album Patrick Moraz made with Yes as Rick Wakeman's replacement on keyboards. It is also the the record that completed the trilogy of vast symphonic albums with huge, epic pieces, which started with Close To The Edge, followed by Tales From Topographic Oceans.
With Relayer, Yes probably went as far as they could go with this kind of large scale music. Having said that, it is probably one of their most underrated, underrecognised, yet highly satisfying works.
There is an aggressive side to the band on this album that we hadn't seen before. At times they come close to being a heavy metal outfit. In fact, I seriously believe that if it wasn't for Relayer, we wouldn't have had 2112, A Farewell To Kings and Hemispheres by Rush. Nor would we have had bands like Dream Theater, flying the prog flag now.
Steve Howe's guitar is more biting than on previous efforts. The rhythm section of Chris Squire and Alan White is faster and more dynamic, and the vocal/lyrical displays of Jon Anderson are more potent and resonate better than they did on the disappointing 'Tales...'. On top of that, Patrick Moraz puts in an admirable debut, with some top notch swirling keyboards.
Opening track, the twenty minutes plus behemoth, The Gates Of Delirium is a massive number, based on Tolstoy's War And Peace. Despite it's length, it's a jaw dropping masterclass of time changes, power playing and dazzling virtuosity. The 'Soon' section at the end of the track is beautifully sung by Anderson, and gives a slight indicator as to the direction of their next studio album, Going For The One.
Sound Chaser is an extraordinary piece, in that despite being a fairly fragmented song, is a glorious wall of noise, again with some awesome individual playing, especially from Steve Howe and Alan White. Moraz also makes a telling contribution.
Closing track To Be Over, like 'Soon' is another indicator of the calmer, more serene music they would make on their next album. It's a lovely, well structured track with even more top class guitar from Howe.
All in all then, Relayer is something of a lost artefact. Yes would never sound like this ever again, and Patrick Moraz would never make another record with the band. It's an album that gets overlooked a lot when considering Yes' best works. It's an album that isn't easy to listen to if you're a new fan. It does take a few plays to actually 'get' the music, but with patience, Relayer is a very rewarding listening experience, especially if you're a musician, and is in dire need of reappraisal.
The package also comes complete with yet more awe inspiring artwork from Roger Dean. Good stuff.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moraz brings pazzazz to Yes' dynamic 1974 fusion classic, 16 Mar 2013
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
`Relayer' released in November 1974 has been called (though not all fans agree) "Yes' last great album". It's certainly a corker, though probably not the best starting point if you're just beginning the journey of discovery into the Yes musical legacy.

Following the departure of Rick Wakeman at the end of the `Topographic Oceans' tour the band spent more than six months auditioning for a replacement keyboard player, all the time working on Jon Anderson's arrangements for the music to be released on `Relayer.' The final choice was Patrick Moraz, a Swiss-born professional musician steeped in the jazz-rock fusion style characterized by Miles Davis' `Bitches Brew' and the then-contemporary Mahavishnu Orchestra. Though `Relayer' was the only album release with this Yes line-up (Wakeman returned to the band late in 1976) Moraz brings a lot to the party and his faster, more aggressive jazz-funk style drives the music along with a special energy and gives it a harder edge.

The album follows the same structure as `Close to the Edge' in that it has a 20-minute opening number 'The Gates of Delirium' containing several movements with varying tempos, then two further numbers each of around 10 minutes: the frenetic `Sound Chaser' and a more relaxing classic Yes number `To be Over' which in mood would have fit right in with the CttE album. The musical ideas were (as usual) conceived by Jon Anderson's rare genius for innovative arrangements, then worked on by the rest of the band in the studio.

The music here is different to that of the band's previous work; it's denser, more multiply layered, darker and in places more aggressive - the only exception being perhaps `To be Over' and the final movement of TGoD `Soon' a slow melodic vocal-led track dominated by Anderson's soaring falsetto and reminiscent in style to `And You and I'. Steve Howe really lets rip with some awesome guitar passages and Chris Squire, as ever, continues to ignore the rule-book and deploy the bass as a lead instrument by playing complex counter-melodies in the treble register (eat your heart out, Jaco Pastorius). Alan White holds the whole thing together through split-second time-signature changes effortlessly executed, proving himself an equal partner in this extraordinary band of musicians.

Like the epic `Tales', you might need to listen to `Relayer' a few times before you start to genuinely enjoy it. Truth be told, no-one is making music like this in the 21st century. Today's musical landscape is in tune with current cultural values: predominantly aimed at instant gratification like fast food, it's in comparison just plain dumbed-down.

This 2003 Rhino mix is the third and best CD release of `Relayer'. The annoying hiss on previous mixes (especially annoying on `Soon') has finally been eradicated, leaving a soundscape clean and beautiful. As a bonus you get an alternate recording of `Soon' (a `single edit') every bit as good as the original, but different; a shortened single-version of `Sound Chaser' and an entire studio run-through of the whole of `Gates' - unpolished, but interesting nonetheless. The 12-page booklet insert has a fine essay on the album by Doug & Glenn Gottlieb, and Roger Dean's distinctive artwork from the original 12-inch vinyl record is reproduced in full.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Pinnacle of Progressive Rock, 16 April 2009
By 
John F (Staffordshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
It is generally considered that 'Close to the Edge' is the classic Yes album and that everything after that represented a downward spiral. However, I would argue that 'Tales from Topographic Oceans' and 'Relayer' represent the ultimate expression of the Yes sound. 'The Gates of Delirium' kicks off the album with its dramatic, narrative lyrics and epic guitar sound. Next up is the euphoric 'Soundchaser' with its searing keyboards and monumental guitar solo. Finally there is the tranquil magnificence of 'To Be Over' arguably Yes's finest hour.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does anybody NOT like this ?, 15 Nov 2007
By 
Gentlegiantprog "Kingcrimsonprog" (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
How can an album with 'Gates of Delirium,' and 'To Be Over,' on it get any less than five stars. If you haven't heard this album yet but like prog, then you're in for one heck of a treat.
Relayer is one of the most epic prog albums you can get. Majestic and Gigantic in equal measure, it has so many nooks and crannies that every listen brings a new treasure to your attention. The Keyboards are great yes, but the rest of the band is on top form too, and this album is simply wonderful as a result.
Steve Howe definitely deserves some sort of medal for this album, and then the bass ? Magical as always, around 5 minutes into Gates of Delirium and you'll be hard pressed not to air bass, guitar and drum all at the same time.
In the 'Soon,' section, you'll be in awe. When you put this album on You'll go on an epic journey for the first twenty minutes and when its over, there are still two tracks to go!
If you don't have this already, you don't need telling twice; Get this now!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars excellent sound quality, 22 May 2011
By 
Leslie Firbank (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
Gates of Delirium is Yes at their best: Sound Chaser is as avant garde as they ever got, and not an easy listen, while To Be Over is gentle, a little over long, and beautifully played. The album sounds far better than the previous CD version - well worth swapping to this one
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes - this is their finest hour!, 23 Mar 2008
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
For me, 'Gates of Delerium' is the definitive Yes track. I loved it on first hearing it 26 years ago and it is above all others, the Yes track I still play regularly at high volume. Its power, structure and delivery are simply sublime. Anderson's voice was at its best - soon oh soon the light; Howe's guitar has never been so aggressive and the Squire bass thumps through some very complex passages. But the highlight of it all has to be Moraz's keyboards. I feel like I'm betraying Wakeman a bit here - one of my heroes - but Moraz's work here beats all other keyboard work on any Yes album before and after.

'Soundchaser' is in parts, as complex as Yes could get. It's taken a few years for me to fully appreciate this track but it's right up there now - one of my favourites. Again, the interplay between keys and guitar is incredible and Jon's cha, cha, cha vocals are as crisp as they have ever been.

'To Be Over' closes the album in far more relaxed style. Great vocal harmonies and musicianship in spades again here. I wish the youth of today were made to sit through this album in music classes in schools, because in my opinion, it's a classic and a real alternative to Floyd's Dark Side and Beatles' Pepper. You'll find no better alternative to verse, verse chorus, verse, chorus, middle eight, chorus to fade; Progressive Rock at its very best.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great album relayer by Yes, 4 Dec 2013
By 
Miss M. Potter "marcia" (england) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
Seventh studio album by the group Yes is RELAYER and it features Patrick Moraz who replaced Rick Wakeman briefly during this period.
The album is loosely based on Tolstoy's book War and Peace and has strong Jazz influences in its sound showing the Moraz's background. The theme shows the futility of war through musical hints of clashing sound effects, dissonant harmonies regimental rhythms all replaced with a gentle melody and lyrical prayer for peace. There are also further spiritual influences and the electric Sitar is featured by Howe.
The album title comes from the lyrics of The Remembering, a track on the previous album Tales from Topographic Oceans.
Track listing is 1 The Gates of Delirium 2 Sound Chaser 3 To be Over. Bonus tracks are 4 Soon (single edit) 5 Sound Chaser (single edit) 6 The gates of Delirium (studio run through)
all tracks remastered
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sensational, sinuous, relentless rock, 1 Nov 2013
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
I hadn't listened to this album for a long time until a discussion with another Yes fan (below the line on another Amazon review, in fact) got me listening again.

Relayer must have come as quite a shock for people who had finished absorbing their previous offering, Tales From Topographic Oceans, which unfolds over a much broader timeframe. The sound here is generally hard-edged and sinuous. Much of the music absolutely ROCKS - not in the loping jazzy manner with which Bruford and Squire drove previous incarnations of the band, but with a relentless funky power and energy. It is not surprising that some fans at the time were nonplussed by Sound Chaser or even thought the band had gone mad. As many others have pointed out, there are echoes here of classic albums by the Mahavishnu Orchestra - and I mean that as a compliment!

In terms of sheer musicianship I'm not sure Yes ever surpassed this. Squire's bass is breathtaking but it never draws attention to itself. The way in which the guitar and bass often interlock is sublime. Steve Howe breathes fire as a rhythm guitarist as well as when he has the spotlight. His decision on Gates of Delirium to use the trebly, biting Telecaster - not a guitar he was associated with before - shows how he saw this material as a new departure for Yes. Sometimes Moraz's keyboards lock with the guitar; sometimes (as in the central section of Gates of Delirium) they fight the guitar, with extraordinary effect. Alan White's drumming is fantastic, especially in Sound Chaser.

And all this is before we consider the music itself. Apparently the album was recorded in quite a piecemeal way but the melodies and grooves combine into wonderful long, sustained lines. These are long compositions which have been created with a clear overall vision, not simply cobbled together from thousands of bits of tape. The melodies are often long-breathed and sustained. Even in the driving battle section in Gates of Delirium the key signature seems to keep changing. As you listen, you always want to know what's going to happen next - even if you have heard it many times before.

Great album. I can't help wishing this Yes line-up had made at least one more before Patrick Moraz was replaced by the returning Rick Wakeman.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music of the Gods., 19 Oct 2013
By 
P. J. Bullough "70's child." (Shrewsbury, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Relayer (Audio CD)
Ah, Relayer...these were the glory days of Yes, and progressive rock in general. We had such an embarrassment of riches during this period that we came to take albums of this quality for granted. 'Topographic Oceans' was an awe-inspiring effort that came out as I was just beginning Year 10 at school. To say I loved it is an understatement...'worshipped' would be nearer the mark. Jon's inspiration was amazing, and on 'Ritual' the words and melodies just seemed to flow on and on in a never-ending stream of musical bliss. I listened to it every day on arriving home from from school, and then the last thing I expected happened-they released another new album, about ten months later! This was another amazing thing-how could they possibly have enough material so soon after the immense effort of 'Topographic'? Well, of course, they did. This was Jon's golden age, and Relayer was another wonderful and timeless album which was followed by 'Olias of Sunhillow' and then 'Going for the One'. It was truly an age of 'miracles and wonders'. Well, if you don't know Relayer, I'll tell you a bit about it. Like 'Close to the Edge' it has an extended musical intro, and again there's a strong sense of purpose. The band sound like they know exactly what they're doing, and where they're going, and indeed they do. Jon's lyrics are all about war, and when he's finished the song all hell breaks loose for about ten minutes and your attention is simply rivetted by the onslaught of musical ideas and riffs. It all builds up to an almighty climax, and then we are treated to a truly great 'Yes' moment: the keyboards win out and there is peace. Not just that, as Steve enters with the most beautiful melody in the Yes cannon, and Jon sets off again singing about the purpose of life, which is to follow the sun/son (apparently!). He must have been listening to you-know who. Side two kicks off with the consistently brilliant and very funky 'Sound Chaser', then finally 'To Be Over', one of the the band's greatest and most overlooked songs. It grips you and doesn't let go until the final release of beauty and enchantment in the uplifting and mysterious closing couple of minutes. It all makes for an exhilarating and satisfying conclusion. This is without doubt one of the greatest albums ever made. It is timeless, thrilling and profound. But if you haven't heard it and decide to invest, do try to sit and listen to it properly: this is classical music played by rock musicians, and you really need to pay attention!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Relayer
Relayer by Yes (Audio CD - 2003)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews