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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Damn fine album!
The White Stripes are a duo who record all their material on old analog recording equipment and refuse to embrace the digital revolution. The result? An album that sounds warmer and more real than just about anything that has been around in years!
That's no exageration either, as this album just exudes a sound that is sadly being left in the past. There are not...
Published on 25 Feb 2004 by michael_m

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Grower ????
People said so many good things..., I prefer to say its ok. Give me The Black Keys any day. Its not bad.
Published 7 months ago by Homermckinley


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Damn fine album!, 25 Feb 2004
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
The White Stripes are a duo who record all their material on old analog recording equipment and refuse to embrace the digital revolution. The result? An album that sounds warmer and more real than just about anything that has been around in years!
That's no exageration either, as this album just exudes a sound that is sadly being left in the past. There are not multiple takes to get the playing perfect either; all the little imperfections in the playing and singing are left in, so it doesn't have the cold feel that most music has now.
The song are great too, starting with "Seven Nation Army", with a catchy bass line that gets the groove going, and then they just keep coming. Meg duets on "I Just Don't Know What to do With Myself", which wrenches the emotion from the words. "Ball and Biscuit" is my favourite - a kind of 21 century blues that Led Zep would be proud of.
The only thing that puzzles me about this album is why there is a picture of Meg's feet on the inside of the cover...
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars breathtaking, 13 April 2003
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
After three albums you wonder exactly what a guitarist and a drummer can do to keep things moving forward whilst maintaining the brilliance of previous efforts. The fact that creatively they have moved forward and musically they have exceeded any hopes I had of their forth album just shows how special The White Stripes really are.
Elephant IS quite simply one of the finest records you will hear this year. As if Jack's heart was actually plugged into the amp it will take on a roller coaster journey that will leave you exhausted at the end. We are taken back to the rawer guitar sound of De Stijl and with a number of tracks like Ball & Biscuit, Black Math and Girl You Have No Faith In Medicine rocking some amazing guitar work you can see that Jack is really having some fun on this record. The Stripes seem to be enjoying their new found fame rather than resenting it and with Elephant you can see how it's paid off. It is such an accomplished album that will be throttling your stereo all summer.
Elephant proves beyond any doubt that The White Stripes are in a league of their own. All the hype and all the praise wouldn't be enough to describe how important this band are to music. God bless the drums, god bless the guitar, god bless The White Stripes.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars most exciting album in years, 16 Feb 2004
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
i had heard a couple of songs off white blood cells but i never went any further. when i heard seven nation army i knew i had to buy elephant, and what a purchase. the most exciting album i have heard since nirvana's in utero. "little acorns" is for me the best track. jacks guitar hits you right in the chest and shows how rock and roll still has a few tricks up its sleeve.in contrast "you've got her in your pocket" is a beautiful little number and along with "hypnotize" are the other stand out tracks.i dont know how many times i have kicked myself for ignoring these guys for so long but believe the hype for a change and buy their music, become excited and passionate about music again.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Album of the 21st century...so far, 15 May 2003
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
When i started seeing the White Stripes in every newspaper and magazine in 2001 i was intrigued. Here was a different band, with a different sound. One boy, one girl, a drumkit and a guitar. Were they brother and sister? Husband and wife? Or both? This didn't matter, White Blood Cells - the bands third album was a triumph-bringing back a dirty 60's blues sound whilst dicovering a new form of rock music. When i saw Elephant being banded around, i though 'oh no, here's another band whose success has got to their head and they will become irretrevably commercial.' However, this time i was wrong. Elephant is a success in all quarters, from the opening stomp of 'Seven Nation Army' to the final hilarity and humour of 'It's true that we love One Another.' The White Stripes experiment more than ever on this album, including releasing Meg's stunning voice on Cold, Cold Night, fiddling with old classics and recreating them as kick-ass rock tunes (I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself) and ranging between the heartwarming (You've Got Her In Your Pocket) and the simply smashing rock n' Rll of Black Math nad Hypnotize. The White Stripes are at the forefront of a new revol;ution in music, it even got to number 1. They are here to stay, even if following this up will be a hard TUSK.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Black and White Stripes, 3 Mar 2006
By 
Mr. J. L. Boutcher "jlb55555" (Suffolk England UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Elephant [VINYL] (Vinyl)
Looking at the group's back catalogue, (so much so quickly !), there's been no difficulty finding wildly varying songs, tunes and themes. Elephant has a similar wide range and most of it is effortlessly good. Reviewers of the CD version are confused on what they want from the White Stripes: Live with it, I say - for this quality. Yes I did love the first and last sides of four most of all, with a bit too much "quietly reflective" for me near the middle, when the writing quality waned perhaps?. Seven Nation Army, The Hardest Button and Hypnotize will all one day be considered classics; I think they are already.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The American British Album, 19 Oct 2003
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
White Blood Cells made The White Stripes big stars but the follow-up Elephant makes them global superstars, and one listen to it and it's difficult not to agree with NME and Kerrang. Since it's such a great album it's only fitting for a track by track analysis:
Seven Nation Army- lead off single and possibly the greatest tune to be released in 2003, the unlikely bassline and rolling percusion make it a classic 10/10
Black Math- this sounds like a robert plant/led zeppelin inspired tune,with Jack howling at the same tempo but it's still a great tune 8/10
There's No Room For You Here- this one doesn't quite catch my attention like the rest, it sounds too similar to dead leaves, so it's not too good 5/10
I Just Don't What To Do With Myself- cover of the burt bacharach anthem and one of the shortest songs, great video accompanied it as well. a knock out cry , sweet stuff 9/10
In The Cold, Cold Night- Meg's Debut on vocals on this acoustic driven tune about love,and surprisingly it's quite catchy but the vocals are best with her brother 7/10
I Want To Warm Your Mothers Heart- this is a somber sad little number about gaining the adulation of a partner's parent, not the best of songs, but still great 6/10
You've Got Her In Your Pocket - more somber songs, but this one is more uplifting making it more enjoyable than the previous one 7/10
Ball and Biscuit- a brilliant track, a long track, great solos, enough said 10/10
The Hardest Button To Button- current single and personal favourite, everything here is brilliant another classic courtesy of The White Stripes 10/10
Little Acorns- a reporter kicks this off which seems strange but it works anyways, Jack's vocals go really funny on this one. weird stuff 9/10
Hypnotize- the shortest song, but one of the best 9/10
The Air Near My Fingers- i think this is my mum's favourite, and i can't blame her, it's just like seven nation army, brilliant 10/10
Girl, You Have No Faith In Medicine- the most rock bluesy song on the album, but it seems too overhyped making somewhat of a dissapointment 4/10
Well It's True We Love One Another- this is where the british references come into play, with Holly Golightly guesting on vocals with Jack and Meg, this is the perfect end to a perfect album
why are you reading this??? just buy it!!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars White Stripes create an instant classic, 15 May 2003
By 
Jeff Markham (Walton-on-Thames, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
After resisting the hype but following with interest the rise of this uniquely talented duo, their 4th offering is simply breathtaking and fully deserves all the accolades. Often mentioned in the same breath as The Strokes due to the classic combo of good old fashioned guitars, drums and an admirably ironic 'attitude', The Stripes are by some way the superior band. This album is destined to be a classic. From the brilliant, pounding opener 'Seven Nation Army', with its floor-shuddering bassline, immediately followed by the thunderous rock riffing of the sinsisterly titled 'Black Math', to the deceptively sweet closer 'Well It's True That We Love One Another', with Meg and Jack joshing with Holly Golightly, this is incendiary rock music that delights, disturbs and moves in equal measure. 'Ball and Biscuit' swaggers with bluesy eroticism, whilst Jack's voice on the superb Bacharach cover 'I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself' and 'I Want To Be The Boy To Warm Your Mother's Heart' knocks spots off more vaunted crooners whilst retaining a winning self-mockery. The lyrics are smart and often poetically funny and speak of the perennial themes of love and loss with a nice line in ironic humour and deft observation. The highest compliment I can pay is that the energy, surprising humour and sheer unpredictability of the music evokes the early Pixies, especially that of 1988's 'Surfer Rosa' and 1989's 'Doolittle' LPs. The Stripes have a similar genius for mixing fast and slow numbers seamlessly whilst retaining an exhilerating momentum and originality all their own. If you like your guitars raw, your riffs fierce and your tunes catchy, this is the album for you. An unqualified masterpiece. Enjoy!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece for the Ages!!!!, 3 April 2003
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
Holy God!!! Ryan Adams was right in his statement that this could possibly be the "greatest rock album of all time." This cd is White Blood Cells times 20 and is of godly Led Zepplin-quality. Believe the hype on this bad boy, this one's going down in the history books. This cd was recorded with primitive 8-track recording equipment older than what the Beatles' used. Songs like Black Math, there's no home for you here, ball and biscuit, girl, you have no faith in medicine, seven nation army, and the fun finale "well it's true that we love one another" are some of the highlights from this timeless cd. And "I just don't know what to do with myself" is an absolutely priceless cover of the Burt Bacharach song.
All the tracks have much more depth (and bass) than Meg and Jack's earlier work. They display a greater musical range and Jack performs some killer guitar work. The intelligent songwriting and brilliant lyrics are also another highlight of the cd. Influences jump from Iggy and the Stooges, Zepplin, Queen, Dylan, old school blues, and even some Velvet Underground is thrown in the mix. "There's no home for you here" sounds like Freddie Mercury on acid!!! It just blows my mind how good this cd is!!!! A landmark achievement.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jack says it's the best since The White Stripes, 7 April 2003
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
Jack White says he loves this record and it's the best since their first album. I don't know whether I agree with the second statement yet but I'm definitely beginning to come round to the first. This is a great album.
Seven Nation Army, The Air Near My Fingers, I Just Don't Know What to do With Myself and You've Got Her In Your Pocket are my favourites right now. Well It's True is a catchy song that shows Jack's sense of humour. The Burt Bacharach cover is brilliant, loads of feeling. In The Cold Cold Night is a good track, and Meg has a sweet voice.
I think the style of 7 Nation and The Air... is a little different, so maybe there is some progression here from their normal sound despite the Stripes' denials and the opinions of reviewers. I admit on the whole it's similar to the rest of their stuff, but with 'stuff' like they have, who's complaining?
This is a brilliant CD. It's probably a fairly good one to start with if you don't have any WS stuff already -(although shame on you for following the hype and even thinking about buying this one before the first album!!!.... ok I admit I did that last year with White Blood Cells, that's how I got into them...shhh...)- because it gives a comprehensive view of their style and their flexibility.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A portal to the White Stripes’ bizarre and brilliant world, 2 April 2003
By 
Rob (Tervuren, Belgium) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Elephant (Audio CD)
After De Stijl, my expectations for the White Stripes were very high. It is a classic. But, admittedly, their last album left me somewhat disappointed. The scratchy guitar sound that in many ways has defined the White Stripes sound was overcooked and many of the songs were disappointing (eg. Aluminium). I doubted the ability of a band with no bass player to produce the sounds that make legendary rock music. However, Elephant has managed to accomplish this. Combining some of the best aspects of each of their previous albums and still keeping it unwaveringly personal, whilst producing perhaps their best tunes, lyrics and beats to date is some achievement.
The riffs in Seven Nation Army, Ball and Biscuit, The Hardest Button to Button and the Air Near My Fingers are spectacular with their deep beats and, especially in Ball and Biscuit, the quality of Jack’s guitar skills are incredible. Meanwhile, the delicate tunes of In the Cold Cold Night (sung by Meg) and I Want To Be the Boy add another dimension to the range of music on display. Black Math shows Jack’s eccentricity with its varied rhythms and his abuse of his vocal cords. Reminder of White Blood Cells possibly.
Personally, I am confused as to why Jack has covered Burt Bacharach’s I Just Don’t Know What To Do With Myself. The other 13 tracks leave you in a diverse and unflinching state that is the White Stripes’ bizarre and brilliant world. Perhaps it is autobiographical to some extent, but it reminds me of Cameron Diaz’s feeble efforts to sing the same song in a Karaoke bar in ‘My Best Friend’s Wedding’. Still, the personal anguish portrayed in his performance mean many people love his version.
Little Acorns and It’s True That We Love Each Other are the finishing touches which give the album the character and individuality we’ve come to expect from the White Stripes. There’s No Room For You Here and Hypnotize make up the quality line-up on Elephant, each truly original and excellently executed.
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